show episodes
 
This podcast is brought to you in partnership with the Canadian Bar Association. It will serve as your educational resource on trauma-informed lawyering. Through inspiring interviews and thoughtful commentary, Myrna will shine a light on a critical competency you did not get any instruction on in law school. Trauma-informed lawyering is a do-no-further-harm, relational approach to the practice of law which benefits you, your clients, your colleagues and the legal profession generally. Lawyer ...
 
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show series
 
Can old ideas help us get through this modern financial storm? We hear from some Canadians involved in a susu, a traditional African and Caribbean savings club, where friends save together and share the wealth. Ginelle Skerritt, a banker lady for eight susu groups in the Toronto area, says they're "a way of empowering our communities to move and to…
 
Unemployment figures may be improving, but some industries remain hard hit. We talk to Chris Brewer, a laid-off WestJet flight attendant in Vancouver who is making ends meet working for FedEx; Saly Davis, whose salon near Moncton, N.B., recently went through a second shutdown; and Jeremy Jestican, an out-of-work oil and gas industry scaffolder who …
 
"The vast percentage of the world's intact biodiversity is on lands that belong to First Nations. These are not just the metaphorical guardians of nature. These are the literal guardians." Wade Davis joins National Chief Perry Bellegarde to discuss the important role First Nations have to play in reversing the dramatic loss of biodiversity on our p…
 
Montana-based reporter Nate Hegyi rode his bike almost 1,300 kilometres along the Great Divide in the U.S. — from his home state through Idaho and Wyoming to Colorado — to take the pre-election pulse. He found people in small towns feeling alienated about their place in the country, and worried about the pandemic and political polarization.…
 
Canada's long-term care homes saw a large number of deaths from COVID-19's first wave. Are they prepared for a resurgence of the virus? We speak to residents in care homes about their concerns as winter looms, and speak to John Callaghan, co-lead counsel for Ontario's Long-Term Care COVID-19 Commission, about what needs to be done to save lives.…
 
The women at the forefront of the climate crisis have stories to tell — so Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Katharine Wilkinson have collected them in a new book of essays, stories and poems: All We Can Save: Truth, Courage, and Solutions for the Climate Crisis. They discuss what's already been lost to climate change, and what can still be saved.…
 
After 25 years without clean running water, dozens of people from Neskantaga First Nation in Ontario have now been evacuated from the community due to possible contamination in their reservoir. We talk to Allan Moonias and Chief Chris Moonias about the conditions in their community, and Chris Skead, chief of the Wauzhushk Onigum Nation, where a boi…
 
A University of Ottawa professor's use of the N-word last month has ignited a firestorm. We hear from Black university students about what they say needs to change to help them feel supported on campus. Our guests are fourth-year University of Guelph student Laila El Mugammar; first-year Mount Saint Vincent University student Priscillia Olawunmi; a…
 
Racially motivated attacks on the Mi'kmaq lobster fishers in Nova Scotia have cost them over $1 million in lost catch and damaged equipment and boats. Despite only taking in about 1% of the lobster catch in Nova Scotia, and working within their treaty rights to fish in their territory outside the commercial season, rights that have been upheld by t…
 
We receive Eduardo Ustaran and Timothy Banks to discuss Privacy Law and its international developments. What was the European Union/United States Privacy Shield and what does this mean for Canada? What do non-privacy law specialists need to know about this and what’s the future for data transfers? Eduardo Ustaran is a partner with Hogan Lovells in …
 
A COVID-19 outbreak that started at a Hamilton spin studio is raising questions about how Canadians will continue to exercise and stay healthy this winter, as the colder weather forces people indoors. We talk to gym owners Victoria Wickett, of Bomb Fitness in Toronto, and Melanie Wall of Inferno Fitness in Sherwood Park, Alta. And epidemiologist Ra…
 
We continue our Road to November series ahead of the U.S. federal election with a stop in Tennessee. We'll hear from young people about what's important to them in this election, and why they're voting. Our guests are Austin Dowell, a Nashville native and Democrat, and Alex Schramkowski, chair of the Tennessee College Republican Committee and a fir…
 
Our national affairs panel discusses the possibility of a snap federal election, pandemic fatigue amid reports of a second wave around the country, and violence against Indigenous fishers in Nova Scotia. We take stock of those issues with Winnipeg Free Press columnist Niigaan Sinclair, Canadian Press reporter Mia Rabson, and the Globe and Mail's Ma…
 
A forensic technique called genetic genealogy helped police identify the man they now believe killed nine-year-old Christine Jessop in 1984, but some people have concerns about the investigative tool's privacy implications. Host Matt Galloway speaks with Anthony Redgrave, who worked with Toronto police on Jessop's case, and Brenda McPhail, with the…
 
The murder of nine-year-old Christine Jessop shocked Canada in 1984, and led to the wrongful conviction of Guy Paul Morin. On Thursday, police said they've now identified her killer as Calvin Hoover, who died in 2015. Kirk Makin’s book Redrum the Innocent examines the case. He joins us to discuss the long search for a killer and the mistakes made a…
 
A dispute between Indigenous and non-Indigenous lobster fishers in Nova Scotia has exploded into violence, and people fear that worse is to come. We discuss the conflict and its long history with CBC reporter Nic Meloney; Colin Sproul, president of the Bay of Fundy Inshore Fishermen's Association; and Cheryl Maloney, a member of the Sipekne'katik F…
 
Almost the first words in new Green Party leader Annamie Paul's victory speech, spoke of solidarity with Canada's First Nations: "As the descendant of the black diaspora who has suffered its own history of oppression and colonialism, I will always stand with indigenous peoples and their calls to action, and their calls to justice and their fight fo…
 
This year's Kentucky Derby happened amid protests about racism and the killing of Breonna Taylor. Greg Harbut, one of the few Black horse owners in Derby history, was asked to boycott. He tells us about the choice he made. Then, we hear from Bob Heleringer, a former Republican state representative, about how Kentucky may lean on Nov. 3.…
 
The Great Barrington Declaration calls for ending lockdowns and trying to achieve herd immunity for COVID-19, but while the White House is reportedly intrigued, many health professionals are not. We talk to epidemiologist and mathematical modeller Ashleigh Tuite, microbiologist and immunologist John Moore, and Timothy Caulfield, the Canada research…
 
First Nations communities that largely avoided the worst of the first wave of COVID-19 are now fearful of what’s to come as the weather gets colder. We talk to Peter Beatty, chief of the Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation in Saskatchewan; Keith Mason, pandemic coordinator in the Kasabonika Lake First Nation in northern Ontario; and Carrie Bourassa, profe…
 
A video of a sexist smear against B.C. politician Bowinn Ma has surfaced in the middle of the province’s election campaign — highlighting the sexism still rife in politics. We talk to two B.C. politicians, Nadine Nakagawa, a city councillor in New Westminster, and Nicole Read, former mayor of Maple Ridge, about their experiences.…
 
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