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Every person diagnosed with narcolepsy embarks on a unique journey. There is no standard path, and for many, this proves to be among the most challenging aspects of the disorder. The Narcolepsy 360 podcast is a series of interviews that take a panoramic view of narcolepsy from the patient, caregiver, research and clinical perspective. Each conversation draws on experiences, best practices and expert advice from patients, parents and doctors. From the latest research to lifestyle tips, our po ...
 
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Diagnosing and managing pediatric narcolepsy with cataplexy poses a significant challenge to clinicians. In younger children, EDS may be vague and present as behavioral problems or concentration difficulties, and its treatment is considered to be similar to that of adults. Yet, the same challenges in diagnosing and treating narcolepsy in adults see…
 
What is the profile of someone at risk for overdose? For many, the perception of overdose risk is tied to someone who is an injection drug user, someone with an opioid use disorder that takes more than they can handle, or someone who unknowingly encounters a drug laced with dangerous levels of fentanyl. Few would dispute that these individuals shou…
 
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, projected to affect 12 million Americans by 2030. However, a significant number of AF cases, particularly non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) remain undiagnosed, putting patients at risk for severe cardiovascular (CV) complications, including increased risk of stroke. It …
 
Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a heterogeneous, neurodegenerative condition with an insidious onset and slow progression, is the leading cause of disability and morbidity as well as the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States. Diagnosing AD is often complicated due to its varied clinical symptomatology and unknown etiology, and currently only …
 
With the impact of the opioid crisis prompting changes in how health care providers (HCPs) treat patients with acute and chronic pain, it has become imperative for HCPs to effectively identify risk factors and clinical presentation of opioid use disorder (OUD). Additionally, clinicians also need to be aware of the underlying neurobiology of addicti…
 
Comprehensive patient-centered approaches to opioid therapy, such as integrating non-pharmacologic interventions, can mitigate risks for abuse and diversion of medication. It is imperative that clinicians determine the need for opioids, as they are not first-line or routine therapy for chronic pain, as well as select the appropriate type, dosage, a…
 
Pain is much more than nociception. It is influenced by a number of psychological and social factors; therefore, it is imperative that physical, functional, and psychosocial assessment tools are used when evaluating pain, whether in person or conducted remotely via telehealth. These tools include the GAD-7, PHQ-9, pain catastrophizing and opioid ri…
 
While MS itself does not increase the risk of contracting COVID-19, treatment decisions should be individualized and made collaboratively between the patient and his or her healthcare provider during the current pandemic. It is imperative that clinicians recognize which patients will benefit from which disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), and that t…
 
Patients with narcolepsy can have a wide range of medical comorbidities, which contribute to the burden of disease as well as underdiagnosis. Additionally, excessive sleepiness may persist despite patients using their CPAP for ≥ 6 hours per night. Early detection of and treatment initiation for EDS is imperative; therefore, clinicians should query …
 
Predictors of poor prognosis in multiple sclerosis (MS)can include demographic and environmental factors, clinical factors, MRI observations, and biomarkers. Early initiation of appropriate therapy is key when personalizing treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), as is having a plan to determine sub-optimal responders, approach…
 
Recent studies have demonstrated the effectiveness and acceptability of reduction or the total elimination of opioids after discharge from minor surgery, with most patients who underwent a dental procedure or oral surgery reporting low pain scores. Written, oral, and visual patient education has been shown to minimize the need for narcotic analgesi…
 
An adolescent or young adult’s first exposure to opioids often occurs following a third molar extraction, and even though85%-90%of these patients find the experience unpleasant due to side effects, up to 15% are at risk for misuse, abuse, and addiction. To mitigate risk of opioid dependency it is imperative that dentists and oral surgeons are aware…
 
It has long been a habit of dentists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons to prescribe narcotics following surgeries such as third molar extraction, with many prescribing as many as 20-30 tablets. A recent study of 105 patients who underwent third molar extraction saw 8 surgeons prescribing 1,773 opioid units, with only 38.4% of those units being co…
 
Crohn’s disease (CD), an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that affects at least 780,000 people in the United States, has recently seen its management goals evolve from merely controlling flares to achieving and sustaining deep remission, which can help a patient avoid progressive bowel wall damage. The only treatments effective in achieving durable…
 
The management of ulcerative colitis (UC) is evolving. In the last 2years, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) and the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG)released updated, evidence-based treatment guidelines with recommendations for disease stratification, prognosis, treatment options, and disease monitoring. Additionally, new…
 
@MondayNightIBD brings social media and clinical practice influencers in gastroenterology together in a weekly online conversation that has become an international platform, moving the field of gastroenterology forward. It crowdsources the knowledge and experience of leading inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) experts, community clinicians, and patien…
 
Reducing excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is an important treatment goal for patients with narcolepsy or obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In order to achieve reduced EDS, cataplexy and sleep paralysis/hypnagogic hallucinations must be controlled to improve disturbed nighttime sleep, which then improves fatigue and brain fog and reduces psychosocial…
 
Screening for hepatitis B virus (HBV) in the emergency department (ED) is an important public health opportunity, as it can reduce transmission in high-risk patients and facilitate linkage to care. HBV testing can be included when screening for sexually transmitted infections(STIs)and hepatis C virus (HCV), and emergency department (ED) physicians …
 
An estimated 1 million people get shingles each year, with about 1 in 10 developing postherpetic neuralgia that lasts months or years, and 1% -4% being hospitalized for complications. Despite the availability of a shingles vaccine, about only 1 in 3 eligible adults ≥ 60 years old and just 37% of adults ≥ 65 years old have been vaccinated. Clinician…
 
The approval of ocrelizumab for primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) was groundbreaking, and more recently the MS community bore witness to another major breakthrough in MS management when siponimod was approved for secondary progressive MS (SPMS). Additionally, new investigational agents such as MD1003 (high-dose biotin) and masitinib are…
 
Breast cancer (BC) is a heterogeneous disease with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression and/or amplification observed in 20%-30% of cases.HER2-positive (+)BC correlates with poor clinical outcomes unless appropriately treated with targeted therapy. Despite significant therapeutic advances, many patients experience disease …
 
Shingles, or herpes zoster, is a common secondary infection that can impose a significant burden, impacting cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, neurologic, ophthalmic, and dermatologic systems. Therefore, despite common perceptions, shingles is more than just a rash, and its extensive burden highlights the need for an effective prevention strategy. Wh…
 
There have been many recent therapeutic advances in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), aiming to improve rates of viral suppression, reduce treatment burden, and improve treatment adherence. Current HIV guidelines provide recommendations for managing patients with HIV, including treatment initiation, therapy switching, and individualized treatment…
 
The neurobiology of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has no identified pathophysiology. This can make it difficult for clinicians to determine a target for therapeutic intervention; therefore, awareness of the mechanisms of action of current and novel therapies is vital when selecting an optimal treatment. In the …
 
Currently, 48% of people diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)in the United States are age ≥ 50, and as the HIV-infected population ages it becomes increasingly important to identify comorbidities and consider them when optimizing treatment decisions, as they can involve risk of cardiovascular complications, renal disease, osteoporosis,…
 
Despite the high prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in the United States, only 32% of patients are aware of their HBV status and less than 30% receive treatment. There are six groups who are at especially high risk: foreign-born Asian/Pacific Islanders, Africa-born Black populations, incarcerated persons, people who inject drugs, men who have se…
 
Recent studies have demonstrated the benefits of early and aggressive treatment strategies in reducing disability progression and the frequency of relapses in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), marking a paradigm shift in the treatment of patients with RRMS. The traditional escalation approach is now often set aside in fav…
 
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, projected to affect 12 million Americans by 2030. However, a significant number of AF cases, particularly non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) remain undiagnosed, putting patients at risk for severe cardiovascular (CV) complications, including increased risk of stroke. It …
 
This live question and answer session is your opportunity to ask questions based on the CME Outfitters virtual symposium where expert faculty utilized augmented reality to add visualization to their discussion of how to implement routine screening protocols for HBV in primary care settings, how to optimize the efficacy and safety profiles of curren…
 
This live question and answer session is your opportunity to ask questions of our expert faculty. The original virtual symposium discussed a series of patient cases with the goal of helping clinicians better understand, share, and implement optimal management strategies for IBD. To view the full activity ahead of this live Q&A, click here.…
 
Belle Hutt is a fitness instructor, influencer, author, advocate and a pwn. In this episode, Belle shares her journey to being diagnosed with narcolepsy type 1. She also shares how she navigated her education while having narcolepsy and not feeling comfortable to disclose to her professors about it. Ultimately, she decided to get personal trainer c…
 
Dr. Indra Narang is the Director of Sleep Medicine at the Hospital for Sick Children, in Toronto, Canada. She is also an Associate Professor at the University of Toronto. Dr. Narang specializes in many sleep disorders including pediatric obstructive sleep apnea and narcolepsy. She established the first pediatric narcolepsy clinic in Toronto which i…
 
Emily Kreuziger is a mom, a professional snowmobiler and a person with narcolepsy. In this episode, Emily shares her long diagnosis process. After being diagnosed and learning more about narcolepsy, she realized her first symptoms started 10 years prior to her actual diagnosis. She also shares how she went from originally being diagnosed with IH, t…
 
Gary Rutter is a sheep shearer, a dad and a person with narcolepsy. You read it right, a sheep shearer, a job so physical that you burn the same amount of calories as if you just ran a marathon. In this episode, Gary shares how he came about doing his unique occupation. He also shares that he was diagnosed with Type 1 Narcolepsy just a few years ag…
 
Dr. Deborah Hartman leads the global research program for narcolepsy and other sleep-wake disorders at Takeda, a biopharmaceutical company. In this episode, Dr. Hartman talks about Takeda’s approach to studying sleep-wake disorders and the importance of working together with people with narcolepsy to better understand what is needed, and with the s…
 
TW: This episode discusses sexual assault and rape, which may be triggering for some individuals. Lauren Thomas is a person with narcolepsy, a narcolepsy advocate and works in the champagne business. In this vulnerable and candid episode, Lauren shares how she was diagnosed with narcolepsy just a little over a year and a half ago, but recounts how …
 
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