show episodes
 
The Science series presents cutting-edge research about biology, physics, chemistry, ecology, geology, astronomy, and more. These events appeal to many different levels of expertise, from grade school students to career scientists. With a range of relevant applications, including medicine, the environment, and technology, this series expands our thinking and our possibilities.
 
The Arts & Culture series enriches our community with imagination and creativity. Whether reinventing the classics for a new audience or presenting an innovative new art form, these events are aimed at expanding horizons. From poetry to music to storytelling, this series leaves our audiences inspired, encouraged, and seeing the world with new eyes.
 
The Civics series at Town Hall shines a light on the shifting issues, movements, and policies, that affect our society, both locally and globally. These events pose questions and ideas, big and small, that have the power to inform and impact our lives. Whether it be constitutional research from a scholar, a new take on history, or the birth of a movement, it's all about educating and empowering.
 
Love Town Hall? Become an insider! In The Moment with Jini Palmer offers a slice of Town Hall culture and puts you in the room for exclusive behind-the-scenes conversations. Listen in as a rotating cast of prominent local voices, along with Chief Correspondent Steve Scher, get to know upcoming speakers before they visit our stages. Get an insider perspective you won’t find anywhere else—a weekly snapshot of all things Town Hall. Fans of Seattle public radio will recognize Steve Scher from hi ...
 
Join University of Washington professor Jeff Shulman for a seventh season exploring the far-reaching impacts of Seattle's physical and cultural transformation. Notable guests from earlier seasons of Seattle Growth Podcast include Hall of Famer Lenny Wilkens, 3-time NBA All-Star Detlef Schrempf, NBA champion Wally Walker, Sonics legend Slick Watts, Pete Nordstrom, Craig Kinzer, Port Commissioner John Creighton, Paul Lawrence, City Councilmember Tim Burgess, SDOT director Scott Kubly, Tim Burg ...
 
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show series
 
If exercise is healthy, why do many people dislike or avoid it? Is sitting really the new smoking? Can you lose weight by walking? Does running ruin your knees? Should we do weights, cardio, or high-intensity training? Professor of human evolutionary biology Dan Lieberman joined us to answer these questions and bust some common myths about exercisi…
 
Art is fundamental. While in some places and times, it may be deemed nonessential or decorative, the reality is that it is a fundamental expression from one human to another, of curiosity, of perspective, of connection. Now an icon of theatre and film, Andre Gregory, joined us to share stories from a life lived for art. With his co-writer Todd Lond…
 
The night of May 25, 2020 changed America. George Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, was killed during an arrest in Minneapolis when a white cop suffocated him. The video of that night’s events went viral, sparking the largest protests in the nation’s history and the sort of social unrest we have not seen since the sixties. While Floyd’s death was cer…
 
For decades, the conflict between Israel and Palestine has been one that has crossed borders and become of international interest. In this week’s episode, professors Jeremy Pressman and Mira Sucharov share, with singular knowledge, their point of view on the conflict—and the way forward. In conversation with Daniel C. Kurtzer, they examine the defa…
 
We’ve all seen charts come through our social media feeds or on the news. More than ever, in a time when conversations are increasingly driven by numbers—for example, in relation to the COVID pandemic—charts are ostensibly used to communicate essential information. But how much can we trust those charts? And how do they influence our perception of …
 
The rules of business are changing dramatically, says the Aspen Institute’s Judy Samuelson, and that means profound shifts in attitudes and mindsets that are redefining our notions of what constitutes business success. In this week’s episode with Senior Correspondent Steve Scher, she shares takeaways contained in her book The Six New Rules of Busin…
 
The Cold Moon occurs in late December, auguring the arrival of the winter solstice. Approaching the winter solstice of his own life, author Roger Rosenblatt embarked upon writing Cold Moon: On Life, Love, and Responsibility, dedicated to the three most important lessons he has learned over his many years. In this conversation with Pulitzer Prize-wi…
 
In 1990, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist Les Payne embarked on a nearly thirty-year-long quest to interview anyone he could find who had actually known Malcolm X. His goal was ambitious: to transform what would become over a hundred hours of interviews into an unprecedented portrait of Malcolm X, one that would separate fact from fi…
 
Have you ever wondered why you have a brain? Let renowned neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett demystify that big grey blob between your ears. Barrett joined us for a presentation with revelations of mind-expanding lessons from the front lines of neuroscience research, with support from her book Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain. She shared w…
 
Today’s episode features Mari Horita, Seattle Kraken’s VP of Community Engagement and Social Impact, who discusses how the pandemic has impacted her community work. Her interview gives insight into adapting the evolving needs. The episode also features Ben Petter, President of Avara Construction. His interview gives insight into the construction bu…
 
The number of Americans arrested, brought to court, and incarcerated has skyrocketed in recent decades. Criminal defendants come from all races and economic walks of life, but they experience punishment in vastly different ways. In this week’s episode, correspondent Marcus Harrison Green talks with sociologist Matthew Clair about his fieldwork in t…
 
The COVID-19 crisis has led to a moment of grief, isolation, and uncertainty that is nearly unprecedented in recent memory. How are we changing as a result, both as individuals and a society? In response to the pandemic, author and editor Jennifer Haupt rallied 90 authors, her publisher, and other business partners to explore the impact in Alone To…
 
It feels like every day there’s something new to be outraged about, or a new piece of information about something that is already outrageous. But how can those feelings of outrage be used productively to create real change? Global social innovation leader Steve Davis believes he has the answer. In order to provide guidance on harnessing our outrage…
 
A high-sodium diet is deadly, many scientists believe. Studies have linked it to high blood pressure, strokes, and heart attacks. It’s been estimated that excess sodium in the American diet causes as many as 100,000 deaths and many billions of dollars in avoidable healthcare costs each year. And yet salt is everywhere in our diets. Why hasn’t salt …
 
NBA champion and former GM & CEO of the Seattle Supersonics, Wally Walker. Walker gives an update on his quest to bring an NBA franchise to a SODO arena and shares his perspective on whether the pandemic makes it more or less likely that Seattle gets an NBA franchise. You will also hear from longtime Seattle Growth Podcast listener and Seattle Supe…
 
In this week’s episode, correspondent and poet Shin Yu Pai shares the fifth installment of Lyric World, featuring poet Arthur Sze in a conversation about Sze’s forthcoming new and collected poems volume, The Glass Constellation. Fusing elements of Chinese, Japanese, Native American, and various Western experimental traditions, Sze explores experien…
 
“Ebo Barton is the queer echo to the first whisper of revolution.” This is what author Tara Hardy had to say about spoken word poet Ebo Barton’s first collection of poetry, Insubordinate, which explores Barton’s discovery of themselves, acknowledging their history, and navigating a world not ready for their existence. Barton invited us to hear sele…
 
Segregation in America—the incessant kind that continues to dog our major cities and has contributed to so much recent social strife—is the byproduct of explicit government policies at the local, state, and federal levels, researcher Richard Rothstein argues. He believes this is especially true for the racial segregation in our neighborhoods. In th…
 
Not too long ago, parents lived with the near certainty of losing a child or two. Even in the world’s wealthiest nations, children died of diarrhea, diphtheria and measles, of scarlet fever and meningitis. Our culture was shaped by these deaths. But over the past century, we’ve made huge strides in reducing infant and child mortality rates, and Per…
 
Stories from two industries hit hard by the pandemic: retail and restaurants. Interviews with Lisa Bridge, the president and CEO of Ben Bridge Jeweler, and restaurateur Bernie Garcia, the president of Moctezuma’s Restaurants. The interviews give lessons of resilience and offer distinct perspectives on the changes in Seattle…
 
College campuses in the mid-twentieth century are an oft-forgotten battle ground in the fight for (and against) civil rights. Professor Dr. Eddie Cole believes the role of campus activism in the fight for social equality has been overlooked. In conversation with writer and historian Shaun Scott, Cole joined us with findings from his meticulously re…
 
Meet the Smart Wife—at your service, an eclectic collection of feminized AI, robotic, and smart devices. Maybe she goes by Siri or Alexa, lives in your Google Home, or is a virtual anime hologram named Hikari Azuma. These feminized digital assistants are friendly and flirty—but what impact are they having on gender equity? Digital sociologist Yolan…
 
Long neglected in world history, the Ottoman Empire was a hub of intellectual fervor, geopolitical power, and enlightened pluralistic rule. Yet, despite its towering influence and centrality to the rise of our modern world, the Ottoman Empire’s history has for centuries been distorted, misrepresented, and even suppressed in the West, historian Alan…
 
Only a few years after the 2013 Sundance Film Festival premiere of Blackfish—an independent documentary film that critiqued the treatment of orcas in captivity—visits to SeaWorld declined, major corporate sponsors pulled their support, and performing acts cancelled appearances. And that was just the beginning of the impact of documentary films. Pro…
 
For more than five decades, Ron Chew has fought for Asian American and social justice causes in Seattle. He joined us for this livestreamed presentation to share stories from his deeply personal memoir My Unforgotten Seattle. In conversation with journalist Naomi Ishisaka, Chew documented the tight-knit community he remembers, describing small fami…
 
Why is the world the way it is? How did we get here? Does everything happen for a reason or are some things left to chance? Philosophers and theologians have pondered these questions for millennia, but scientist Sean B. Carroll joined us with startling scientific discoveries to assert that we live in a world driven by chance. Carroll drew from his …
 
Medina Tenour Whiteman stands at the margins of whiteness and Islam. An Anglo-American born to Sufi converts, she feels perennially out of place—not fully at home in Western or Muslim cultures. In this week’s episode, Rabbi Elana Zaiman talks with writer and poet Medina Tenour Whiteman about her searingly honest memoir, The Invisible Muslim: Journe…
 
UW Foster professor Jeff Shulman interviews the executive director of the SODO Business Improvement Area, Erin Goodman. SODO is home to Starbucks headquarters, many industrial companies, and an active port. The episode also features an interview with musician Marco Antonio de Carvalho. The interviews give insight into different ways the people and …
 
From funding, to vouchers, to charter schools, public education policy has become a political football. Many feel that we are in the midst of a full-scale attack on our nation’s commitment to public education. And constitutional law scholar Derek W. Black contends that this assault threatens not just public education, but democracy itself. In this …
 
Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) is a collaborative cross-disciplinary nonprofit biomedical research organization based in Seattle. In 2020, ISB is celebrating its 20th anniversary with a four-part virtual speaker series highlighting some of the most important topics in science and health care. ISB and Town Hall proudly present microbiome resear…
 
In this week’s episode, Senior Correspondent Steve Scher talks with historian Ruth Goodman, who joins us with a fascinating micro-history of how English women sparked a worldwide revolution from their kitchens. With support from her book The Domestic Revolution: How the Introduction of Coal Into Victorian Homes Changed Everything, Goodman argues th…
 
UW Foster professor Jeff Shulman interviews UW Husky Football Hall of Fame Running Back Greg Lewis who is the executive director of the Meredith Mathews East Madison YMCA. The episode also features an interview with musician Tekla Waterfield. The interviews give insight into how non-profits and musicians are navigating the pandemic.…
 
Ever wondered what nonbinary and gender nonconforming really mean? Genderqueer writer Stuart Getty joined us with a charming guide that answers that question and many more. In this livestreamed presentation, Stuart Getty unpacks all your burning questions in a fun, visual way, in conversation with local comedian Max Delsohn. With clips from their s…
 
Hugo Black, Glen Taylor, George McGovern, Robert F. Kennedy, Herbert Lehman, Theodore Francis Green, Al Gore, William Proxmire, Sherrod Brown. Did you know the common thread is a desk? Current desk occupant and Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown joined us to share stories of those who preceded him. Utilizing anecdotes and history from his book Desk 88: Eig…
 
Alzheimer’s is a global health problem, with more than 5 million people in the US alone living with the disease. Tremendous gains have been made in the understanding of the science and basic biology underlying Alzheimer’s and other dementias. In this presentation, Dr. Maria Carrillo joined us to share the latest advances. Presented by Town Hall Sea…
 
In this week’s episode, Correspondent Sally James talks with Behavioral Insights Team members Michael Hallsworth and Elspeth Kirkman, who present a definitive introduction to the behavioral insights approach, which applies evidence about human behavior to practical problems. With support from their book, Behavioral Insights, Hallsworth and Kirkman …
 
UW Foster School of Business professor Jeff Shulman interviews the president/CEO of the Downtown Seattle Association, Jon Scholes, and a long-time Central District entrepreneur and advocate Jesdarnel “Squirt” Henton. Scholes and Henton share how they are navigating the changes in Seattle and their outlook for the future of the city.…
 
Comedian, actor, and father Michael Ian Black wants to get (mostly) serious about the trouble with masculinity. He shared a heartfelt letter to his college-bound son—which also happens to be his book A Better Man: A (Mostly Serious) Letter to My Son—to offer a poignant look at boyhood, reveal his own complicated relationship with his father, and ex…
 
What does it mean to be an American? Author Laila Lalami joinsed us to discuss this question in conversation with fellow author Viet Thanh Nguyen. Drawing from her book Conditional Citizen, she recounted her unlikely journey from Moroccan immigrant to US citizen, using it as a starting point for her exploration of the rights, liberties, and protect…
 
The fight against climate change is monumental and urgent. Yet one aspect of the international dialogue is conspicuously absent, Doug Kelbaugh argues—urban design. Professor and urban planner Doug Kelbaugh joined us to share from his book The Urban Fix: Resilient Cities in the War Against Climate Change, Heat Islands, and Overpopulation. He explain…
 
In this week’s episode, Senior Correspondent Steve Scher talks with journalist Matthew Hongoltz-Hetling, who joins us with a sometimes funny, sometimes terrifying tale of the Free Town Project, a town in New Hampshire, and bears. In A Libertarian Walks Into a Bear: The Utopian Plot to Liberate an American Town (And Some Bears), Hongoltz-Hetling wea…
 
For better or worse, Wagner is often considered the most widely influential figure in the history of music. Around 1900, the phenomenon known as Wagnerism saturated European and American culture. Anarchists, occultists, feminists, and gay rights pioneers saw him as a kindred spirit. Then Adolf Hitler incorporated Wagner into the soundtrack of Nazi …
 
Is America fated to decline as a great power? Can it recover? Foreign policy expert Andrew Imbrie joined us in conversation with former White House communications director Jen Psaki to weigh in on exactly these questions. With absorbing insight from his book Power on the Precipice: The Six Choices America Faces in a Turbulent World, Andrew introduc…
 
Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) is a collaborative cross-disciplinary nonprofit biomedical research organization based in Seattle. In 2020, ISB is celebrating its 20th anniversary with a four-party virtual speaker series highlighting some of the most important topics in science and health care. ISB and Town Hall proudly present Dr. Jennifer Rei…
 
In this week’s episode, Correspondent and Town Hall Digital Media Manager Jini Palmer talks with Puget Sound Energy’s Tyler O’Farrell about renewable energy. Town Hall is a PSE Powerful Partner, so for Energy Awareness Month in October, O’Farrell discusses the renewable energy programs at PSE that are designed to keep sustainability within reach. F…
 
During the Pacific War, more than 200,000 Korean girls were forced into sexual servitude for Japanese soldiers. Barely 10 percent survived to return to Korea, where they lived as social outcasts. Since then, self-declared comfort women have come forward only to have their testimonies and calls for compensation largely denied by the Japanese governm…
 
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