show episodes
 
It's easy to talk about what's wrong in Baltimore. The challenge is to talk about what's next. In each episode, Wes looks at innovative ideas that are working in other cities, places like Cincinnati, St Louis, and Detroit. And he asks the question: Can those ideas work for Baltimore? This program is made possible by Genine and Josh Fidler, and supported by the Baltimore Community Foundation, created by and for the people of Greater Baltimore, where many donors join together to make the regio ...
 
Monday-Friday from noon-1:00, Tom Hall and his guests are talking about what's on your mind, and what matters most to Marylander's, the latest news, local and national politics, education and the environment, popular culture and the arts, sports and science, race and religion, movies and medicine. We welcome your questions and comments. E-mail us at midday@wypr.org
 
Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR's Morning Edition. We'll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, WYPR reporters and other journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you?d like to hear, email us at ontherecord ...
 
Life in the Balance is a monthly program that asks: What are the systemic issues in Baltimore that keep marginalized people from reaching their full potential, and what are the solutions to those problems?Each episode is rooted in an individual's story about overcoming a personal hurdle related to one of these systemic issues. It might be homelessness, drug abuse, or a post-incarceration employment struggle. This narrative engages the listener throughout the program as concerned stakeho ...
 
Since 2002, "Your Maryland" hosted by Ric Cottom, has presented little-known human interest stories from Maryland's past. Beginning with accused witches and the murderous career of John Dandy in the earliest days of the colony, through Morgan State's fabled "Ten Bears" in the 1970's, the show covers nearly four centuries of heroes, scoundrels, floods, fires, riots, plots, athletes (two-and four-legged), beautiful spies, brilliant writers, misunderstood pirates, and ghosts. All of that color, ...
 
Sports at Large is a weekly exploration of the issues and people who play and watch sports. SaL goes behind the headlines and stats to find the how and why, and the ways in which sports intersect with and influence our daily lives. SaL features interviews and commentaries from professionals and fans a like to tell a more complete story. One person described it as "a thinking fan's guide to sports."
 
The Noir and Bizarre explores the dark and strange stories we tell ourselves about human existence - occult history, ghosts, haunted houses, and secret crimes - with a special emphasis on stories that draw on the rich history and culture of Baltimore. Additionally, the show philosophically asks big questions about spiritual narratives and rituals surrounding life and death.
 
Truth and Reconciliation is a forum for the people of Baltimore to discuss the challenges of law enforcement reform, alternative paths to improving communal safety, and how to hold power accountable.Through personal tales of triumph and tragedy, Truth and Reconciliation seeks new perspectives on how to improve the lives of the people of the city through activism, analysis, and actionable ideas.Hosted by Taya Graham, Sean Yoes, and Stephen Janis
 
Catherine Collinson, the Transamerica Institute's founding president who also leads Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies® TCRS (a foremost expert on the state of retirement readiness in America), and Hector De La Torre, who leads the The Transamerica Center for Health StudiesSM TCHS, discuss the broad range of issues related to financial literacy, retirement, and health and wellness.
 
What follows is a counter to the narrative about the people of Baltimore. It's the story of Turnaround Tuesday -- the jobs movement for and with Baltimore's residents who have been excluded from earning a living, years after incarceration. It's the story of change hidden beneath the headlines about our city. It's a story of Baltimore that only Baltimore can tell. And we intend to tell it like it is. Higher Purpose is a 4 episode audio-documentary series written, produced, and narrated by Yas ...
 
Questions are raised when an out-of-town businessman comes to Baltimore offering bold promises. Kahan Dhillon, a young Sikh, Indian-American real estate developer from Fairfax County, mysteriously shows up in Baltimore touting a $10 billion citywide redevelopment plan. Although he represents himself as a civic leader and savior for a city in need of change, something seems awry. Is Kahan Dhillon a legitimate developer looking to do good for Charm City? Or is the city of Baltimore being explo ...
 
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show series
 
Mayor Brandon Scott will keep Baltimore’s Phase 1 COVID-19 in place the city’s intensive and acute care units approach the limits of their capacity.. “Unfortunately, we are still seeing the impacts of New Year's Eve in our data,” the Democrat said at a news conference. “These are not decisions that I made lightly.” Scott said the plight of restaura…
 
January 18, 2021 is Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, a federal holiday established by the US Congress in 1983 to honor the life and work of the slain civil rights leader and, in the words of this year's presidential proclamation, to "encourage all Americans to recommit themselves to Dr. King’s dream by engaging in acts of service to others, to their co…
 
Dante Barksdale, a leader of the violence-prevention program Safe Streets, was shot to death on Sunday in East Baltimore. Barksdale, who was also known as "Tater," dedicated the last decade of his life to mediating conflicts, doing critical neighborhood outreach, and reducing homicides in Baltimore. Here is Future City's 2019 conversation with Dant…
 
Former Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr., a potent force in Maryland politics for half a century and the longest serving state senate president in US history, died Friday after a two-year battle with prostate cancer. He was 78. Miller, who stepped down as Senate President in 2019 because of his failing health and resigned his seat represe…
 
Maryland is expanding access to telehealth services for mental and behavioral health disorders. Lt. Gov. Boyd Rutherford said in a news conference Thursday that insurance carriers and Medicaid would be required to reimburse patients for audio-only telehealth services under a measure they are sending to the General Assembly.…
 
(This program originally aired August 4, 2020) When the novelist, journalist, playwright and activist James Baldwin died in 1987, his place in the panoply of great American writers was assured. He is remembered as one of the most eloquent observers of the Black experience, and an insightful and compelling critic of racial inequality. He was prolifi…
 
The clash between residents of an historically African American neighborhood in East Towson and a developer of affordable housing is coming down to a final legal battle. Both sides squared off Wednesday before Administrative Law Judge Maureen Murphy, who will settle the dispute.By John Lee
 
It’s another edition of Midday at the Movies, our monthly conversation about films and filmmaking. And Tom is joined once again on Zoom by our good friend Ann Hornaday – she’s a film critic for The Washington Post and the author of the wonderful movie-goers’ guide, Talking Pictures: How To Watch Movies. Also with us on Zoom is our friend Jed Dietz,…
 
Baltimore City Council members introduced a package of housing relief bills Wednesday night during a reconvened meeting that was suspended earlier this week when the city’s video conferencing system failed due to a Webex outage. Though the coronavirus pandemic is not the genesis of the city’s longstanding housing insecurity issues, its resounding e…
 
As Maryland’s General Assembly reconvened in Annapolis Wednesday, Senate President Bill Ferguson said fixing Maryland’s “broken unemployment insurance system” is among his top priorities. Meeting with reporters after the Senate’s opening session, Ferguson said one way to alleviate the backlog of 41,000 claimants still awaiting unemployment benefits…
 
Wednesday is the first day of the 2021 session of the Maryland General Assembly. Given the restrictions occasioned by the pandemic, this 90-day session -- the 442nd in Maryland's legislative history -- will be unlike any other. Today, Part Two of our preview of the session, with Senate President Bill Ferguson, a Democrat who has represented Distric…
 
As Maryland’s annual General Assembly session opens Wednesday, a coalition of lawmakers and advocates are pushing a package of bills that would provide relief to tenants and homeowners hurt by the pandemic. The session begins weeks before eviction and foreclosure moratoriums expire on Jan. 31.By Sarah Y. Kim
 
Baltimore County teachers told the school board Tuesday night that they need help dealing with their students who are in crisis because of the COVID-19 pandemic. During a public hearing on the proposed budget for the coming year, the teachers pleaded with the school board to ask the county for more money to pay for mental health professionals and s…
 
Frustrated by legislative inaction, Governor Larry Hogan signed an executive order Tuesday to create a citizens’ commission to redraw Maryland’s Congressional district lines. The lines Democratic state lawmakers drew almost 10 years ago often have been held up as a textbook example of partisan gerrymandering. And Hogan’s attempts to create a citize…
 
The 2021 Session of the MD General Assembly begins tomorrow. Today, a preview of the session with the Speaker of the House, Adrienne Jones, who represents the 10th District, in Baltimore County. Tom recorded his conversation with Speaker Jones (via Zoom audio) on Monday, January 11, 2021, about a half hour before Gov. Larry Hogan held a press confe…
 
A short, concise four-page article of impeachment of President Donald Trump, co-sponsored by more than 200 Democratic congressmen, may come to the floor of the House of Representatives as soon as tomorrow. Yesterday, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi gave Vice President Mike Pence 24 hours to convene the cabinet and pursue removing Mr. Trump under …
 
The economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic are driving Baltimore County School Superintendent Darryl Williams’ proposed $1.77 billion budget that goes before a public hearing Tuesday. For example, Williams said, more of the county’s students qualify for free and reduced-price meals because of the pandemic.…
 
Baltimore City council members were in the middle of introducing a slew of new legislation at their first virtual meeting of the year Monday when a robotic voice interrupted their proceedings: “The host has not yet arrived. Please stand by. ” The voice was the harbinger of every lawmaker’s worst logistical nightmare during a virtual legislative ses…
 
Baltimore City Council members and housing advocates announced a legislative package Monday afternoon to address housing insecurity. The bills will be introduced at January’s city council meetings. The package includes a bill that would prevent landlords from evicting tenants when their leases expire. Landlords have been able to legally evict tenan…
 
Welcome to another edition of Midday with Tish the Commish, our recurring series of live conversations with Dr. Letitia Dzirasa, the Commissioner of the Baltimore City Health Department and the city's chief public health advocate. In today's program, Dr. Dzirasa provides an update on the pace and local availability of the COVID-19 vaccination progr…
 
Now, a conversation about what makes us, us. Or more specifically, what makes me, me and you, you? With all that we share in common -- heads and shoulder, knees and toes, for example -- what are the reasons that we are all unique individuals? Dr. David Linden is a neuroscientist and professor at Johns Hopkins University who started thinking about t…
 
Nursing home residents and staff are among the first in line for the COVID-19 vaccine. But in Maryland, many nursing homes have not used a majority of their allocated doses. Joseph DeMattos Jr., the CEO of the Health Facilities Association of Maryland, said that distributing the vaccine is a huge logistical undertaking.…
 
Our Newsmaker guest today is Maryland's junior senator, Chris Van Hollen, who joins Tom Hall to discuss the extraordinary, historic and tragic events of the past week, and the way forward for members of Congress, for President-elect Joe Biden and for the country. Yesterday, incoming Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelos…
 
Midday theater critic J.Wynn Rousuck joins us again today with her reviews of two new films produced and now streaming on Netflix, that spotlight the extraordinary work of the late, two-time Pulitizer Prize-winning playwright August Wilson. Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom is one of 10 plays August Wilson wrote chronicling the African-American experience i…
 
Today, another edition of the Midday Healthwatch, our monthly conversation with Dr. Leana Wen. She is an emergency physician and former Baltimore City Health Commissioner who teaches at the George Washington University School of Public Health. She’s also a columnist for The Washington Post and a medical analyst for CNN. Dr. Wen joins Tom today to d…
 
Yesterday at this hour, the self-proclaimed “law and order” President, Donald Trump incited an insurrection in a 90-minute diatribe delivered just a few blocks from the U.S. Capitol, and within minutes of his concluding his remarks, at Trump’s suggestion, his supporters marched to the Capital, stormed the building, and disrupted the constitutionall…
 
Yesterday, the weather in Georgia was sunny and mild. The tenor of the four campaigners who were locked in battles for Georgia's two Senate seats was anything but sunny and mild. The campaigns set records for spending and turnout for special elections. As we speak, the dust is beginning to settle in Georgia. The Rev. Raphael Warnock, a former pasto…
 
In Washington today, supporters of President Trump gathered to hear speakers, including the President himself, assert the fantasy that Trump won the Presidential election. Later, large crowds of pro-Trump demonstrators, most unmasked, massed on the steps of the US Capitol and began breaching its public entrance, threatening the security of the buil…
 
Maryland Humanities is a nonprofit organization founded nearly 50 years ago that creates and supports educational experiences in the humanities. Among its most popular programs are Maryland History Day and One Maryland One Book. Maryland Humanities recently elected a new leadership team. Last February, Phoebe Stein left the organization after servi…
 
Over the past eleven months, the COVID-19 pandemic has taken the lives of more than 353 thousand Americans and upended the economic livelihood of millions more. The number of Americans who struggle each week to put food on their tables has climbed to nearly one in 8 – an estimated 26 million people, according to the Census Bureau. Even before the p…
 
As of Saturday, a dozen Republican Senators had promised to join about 140 Republican members of the House in voting against certifying that Joe Biden has been elected President. That vote is scheduled for Wednesday. Yesterday, the Atlanta Journal Constitution and the Washington Post released a tape and transcript of a call between President Trump …
 
(Originally broadcast November 12, 2020) On this archive edition of Midday, Tom talks with Evan Osnos, a staff writer for The New Yorker, about his latest book, Joe Biden: The Life, the Run, and What Matters Now. Tom spoke with Mr. Osnos about a week and a half after the election, on the day that several media sources had added Arizona to the win c…
 
(Originally broadcast on November 17, 2020) In 1961, President John F. Kennedy implored Americans to “ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.” Twenty years later, Ronald Reagan won election by asking Americans, “Are you better off now than you were four years ago?” Not if the country was better off; if you we…
 
(Originally aired October 15, 2020) Today, Tom’s guest for the hour is the award-winning novelist, literary scholar, and artist, Charles Johnson. Dr. Johnson is bestknown as the author of Middle Passage, the epic novel about the 1830s slave trade for which he won the National Book Award for Fiction in 1990. At the time, he was only the second Afric…
 
(This program was originally broadcast Sept. 17, 2020.) Tom's guest today is Robert B. Reich. He’s a busy and distinguished guy. He served in three administrations, including as Labor Secretary during Bill Clinton’s presidency. He’s a professor of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley, a columnist for Newsweek and The Guardian, an…
 
This program originally aired on Tuesday May 14, 2019. Frederick Douglass is one of the most gifted and admired figures in American history. He was enslaved for the first 20 years of his life. By the time of his death in 1895, he had become the world’s most photographed man, a counselor to President Abraham Lincoln, an unparalleled public intellect…
 
Hello and Happy Holidays! Welcome to the Midday Christmas Eve Special, with host Tom Hall. Today, we’ll spend the hour listening to some music and some poetry of the season, plus, a story by Baltimore writer Raphael Alvarez. We've put together a playlist of our selections, and you can find them below (when you've clicked into this article) in the o…
 
Tom's guest today is the New York Times best-selling author, Jess Walter. He is the author of seven novels, a short story collection, and a nonfiction book. His 2012 novel, Beautiful Ruins, was on the Times best-seller list for more than a year. Jess Walter's latest novel is called The Cold Millions. It's an expansive and beautifully crafted chroni…
 
2020 comes to a close a week from tomorrow, and for many of us, it can’t end soon enough. It has been a year of unprecedented calamity, with levels of disease and death that are incomprehensible. Nearly 80 million people are infected with the Coronavirus around the globe; about 18 million are infected in the United States. More than 10 million Amer…
 
COVID-19 has changed the way we gather, moving much of our social, work, and communal lives online. People are using the internet for things like doctors’ appointments and religious services, and countless institutions have had to quickly adapt to deal with the new reality. But getting online isn’t always so easy, especially in a city like Baltimor…
 
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