show episodes
 
The Jack Benny Show AKA The Jello Program AKA The Lucky Strike Program aired from the 1930's right through to the 1950's. Each week your host, John Henderson, brings an episode from that week 60-80 years ago. It's old, yet still as funny as ever. "The Jack Benny program, starring Jack Benny with Mary Livingstone, Phil Harris, Rochester, Dennis Day, and yours truly Don Wilson"
 
Conversations between a daughter, Jane Craigie, and her father, Iain Craigie. Iain spent a career in Intelligence from the late 1950s until the early 2000s, living in the UK, Cyprus, India, Turkey, Hong Kong, Saudi Arabia and Labuan. The podcast covers the technology used, the methods of spying, the targets, the relevance of place and time and the historical context. The observations and intrigues of a life in surveillance make compelling listening, as well as what it was like having an adve ...
 
Stories, poetry, histories and memories are all shared in our fortnightly podcast created by Lewisham libraries staff. We started collecting material at the beginning of Covid-19 lockdown in April 2020 and shared them with customers and residents through Facebook as the weekly series “Lewisham Voices”. We are now publishing them more widely through this podcast. There are memories from residents of growing up in Lewisham during the 1950s, and local author Caleb Azumah Nelson reflects on a mo ...
 
Hosts Scott Kelley from Boston and Jim Towns from Los Angeles humbly bring to you thorough, exciting, and fun reviews of all your vintage horror movie favorites. Our #1 focus, besides having a total blast talking about horror, is researching and delivering to the listeners little known and obscure facts about their favorite movies. The hosts have a special fondness for the Universal Studio films from the 1920's to the 1950's. This podcast is extremely interactive with the listeners thru soci ...
 
You will enjoy going "into the organ loft" to listen to the uplifting sounds of Reverend Bert Jones' masterful playing. You'll hear hymns, Gospel songs, sacred classics, or choruses, as well as interesting and informative comments about how many of the songs were written. Through the Hymnbook, a subsidiary of the ministry, A Visit with the Joneses, has been airing since the mid-1950's. Usually the organ music is played on a Hammond 3000; you will hear chimes and the singing of a live canary, ...
 
The 1950s & 60s saw a wave of radical movements. Che Guevara and the Cuban Revolution. The Black Panthers. Quebec and Canada had the FLQ — a showdown that dissolved into crisis. By October 1970, there were soldiers in the streets, communities on edge, kidnapping and terror in the headlines. But those frightening weeks were just the crescendo of a wave of terror and violence that was nearly a decade in the making. This series will reveal the stories of that time through immersive storytelling ...
 
SEASON TWO COMING 2021! A present day journalist uncovers the audio tapes of a 1950s private eye who cracked the greatest unsolved murder mystery Hollywood has ever known... and didn’t tell a soul. Starring Joe Manganiello, Alfred Molina, Constance Zimmer, Alan Tudyk, Camilla Luddington, Mike Colter, Misha Collins, Khary Payton, Nolan North, and Oliver Vaquer. "Angel Eyes" performed by Desi Dennis-Dylan. Directed by E. Ryan Martz. Written by Oliver Vaquer. Story by E. Ryan Martz and Oliver V ...
 
Drawing inspiration from 1950s radio serials and ghost stories, Midnight Radio follows two women finding love through an unlikely correspondence about community, leaving your small hometown, our relationship to the past, what it means to be haunted, and what we leave behind when we die. Remember: all ghost stories are love stories.
 
The West End Stories Project captures the experiences of individuals who lived in Cincinnati's West End during the second half of the 20th century for urbanites today who want to know more about the neighborhood’s transformation. Cincinnati’s West End was once a vibrant community full of people, opportunities, and excitement. But due to urban renewal projects in the 1950s, the historic West End was largely razed for the creation of interstate I-75 and housing projects. This, combined with se ...
 
With a wealth of musicals, westerns, sci-fi films, epics, comedies, character dramas and samurai movies, the 1950s was an exciting time for cinema. Here at Easy Riders Raging Podcast we're looking back at all the classics of the decade, discussing the films of Hitchcock, Wilder, Kurosawa, Kubrick and more. Aside from our discussions, each episode includes some of our trademark features such as Recastarama (where we recast the film using current actors) and Who Am I (where we work out who we ...
 
A podcast about five Polish jazz musicians who came of age in the 1950s and became mesmerized by the music they heard on the outlawed American radio station Voice of America. You’ll hear about difficult decisions, compromises, and longing for a better world. How they went from learning to play jazz from worn-out vinyls, to becoming icons that continue to inspire the music world today. Hosted by Paweł Brodowski, brought to you by Culture.pl, the flagship brand of the Adam Mickiewicz Institute.
 
In this special podcast series called Merdeka Memories, listen to the stories of Singapore’s Merdeka Generation. Through the experiences of these men and women born in the 1950s, relive their struggles and opportunities while they grew up in post-independence Singapore. How their life has defined and strengthened the Singapore spirit?
 
Soul music (often referred to simply as soul) is a popular music genre that originated in the African American community in the United States in the 1950s and early 1960s. It combines elements of African-American gospel music, rhythm and blues and jazz..Researchers are looking to the salience network of the brain to develop music-based treatments to help alleviate anxiety in patients with dementia.
 
Host, Dave Schwensen, and his friends Kelly, Tom, and Logan have chosen some of their favorite comedians from the 1950s, ‘60s, or ‘70s. They take a look at how they got started, their most successful comedy albums, and their lasting influence today! Sit back, relax, and get ready to laugh! *This podcast is a production of the Ohio Film Tax Credit.
 
"Women in Tech across Asia" is an international development podcast that explores Asia's economic development since the 1950s. The show's episodes focus on what economists call the Asian Tigers and "Tiger Cubs," from Singapore to South Korea. With an emphasis on both high-tech and low-tech industries, the show tells the story of how women reformers have partnered with both workers' movements and governments since the 1950s to catalyze Asia's economic miracle. Politicians, policymakers, busin ...
 
Watching Lovecraft Country is the unofficial BEST companion podcast to HBO's drama horror television series, Lovecraft Country, by Misha Green. Join Joe and Jimbob every week as we break down each episode. We'll tell you what we liked, what we didn't like, and why the book was better. Based on the 2016 novel of the same name by Matt Ruff, Lovecraft Country follows Atticus Freeman as he joins up with his friend Letitia and his Uncle George to embark on a road trip across 1950s Jim Crow Americ ...
 
Have you rediscovered your childhood baseball cards, or do you have that "90s nostalgia" itch you've been looking to scratch? Come take a trip down memory lane as we take a second look at some famous (and not so famous) baseball cards from the 1990s all the way back through the 1950s. Wax Ecstatic is hosted by long-time collector Matt Sammon, who always has a fun look back at some of that classic cardboard in your collection!
 
A new radio show hosted by DJ Biggie Boutte' from the swamps of South Louisiana. Playing old, new, and obscure cuts from the 1950's to current. Mainly focusing on 60's garage-punk, psychedelic, traditional country, skiffle, with some rockabilly, surf, and Cajun thrown in as well. A big gumbo of kick ass music. Laissez les bons temps rouler!
 
Set in the Louisiana bayou country, here is a drama rich with suspense...the story of lovely Trillium Pierce powerless at the mercy of a murderer who believes that he has no power over himself - that his determination to kill is written in the stars. The frightened girl is helpless, as her friends at Aurelian College are victimized by the menace who stalks the swampland in a nun's habit.Margaret Ann Hubbard was a writer of various genres: historical novels, Catholic children's books, and sev ...
 
Before political correctness, it was a bachelor's paradise! Bachelor's Paradise is a radio play (AKA podcast) about the misadventures of college freshman Robert Turner and his inappropriate best friend, Cornelius Crane, XVI. It's the 1950s. The Cold War rages on. Like Henry David Thoreau, Robert is living in a cabin in the woods in the middle of a harsh New England winter. His sex-crazed pal Cornelius is responsible for his situation. Will these spritely young lads possess the skills require ...
 
Value investing is more than an investment strategy — it’s a fundamental way of thinking about finance. Value investing was developed in the 1920s at Columbia Business School by professors Benjamin Graham and David Dodd, MS ’21. The authors of the classic text, Security Analysis, Graham and Dodd were the very pioneers of their field and their security analysis principles provided the first rational basis for investment decisions. Despite the vast and volatile changes in the economy and secur ...
 
The best NEW rockabilly music alongside the greatest rockin' records of all time! Join Motorbilly Radio's DJ Del Villarreal for a lively blend of 1950's styled rock'n'roll, hillbilly bop, country boogie, western swing, raucous RnB, desperate garage & twangy hot rod music in each week's radio programs: hear exclusive LIVE interviews with the artists & organizers in our world-wide rockin' scene! "Good to the last BOP!™" Requests? Email: del@motorbilly.com
 
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show series
 
At the dawn of the 1950s, a promising and dedicated young painter named Helen Frankenthaler, fresh out of college, moved back home to New York City to make her name. By the decade's end, she had succeeded in establishing herself as an important American artist of the postwar period. In the years in between, she made some of the most daring, head-tu…
 
During the years of the Early Republic, prominent Native leaders regularly traveled to American cities--Albany, Boston, Charleston, Philadelphia, Montreal, Quebec, New York, and New Orleans--primarily on diplomatic or trade business, but also from curiosity and adventurousness. They were frequently referred to as "the Chiefs now in this city" durin…
 
Abbott and Costello were an American comedy duo composed of comedians Bud Abbott and Lou Costello, whose work on radio and in film and television made them the most popular comedy team of the 1940s and early 1950s and the highest-paid entertainers in the world during World War II. Their patter routine "Who's on First?" is one of the best-known come…
 
Emma Rothschild’s new book, An Infinite History: The Story of a Family in France over Three Centuries (Princeton University Press, 2021) (see the book’s accompanying website here: https://infinitehistory.org), is a beautiful work that, by following the lives of one obscure family over five generations, weaves together a history of France through th…
 
Between the decriminalization of contraception in 1969 and the introduction of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in 1982, a landmark decade in the struggle for women's rights, public discourse about birth control and family planning was transformed. At the same time, a transnational conversation about the "population bomb" that threatened global f…
 
For most of the eighteenth century, British protestantism was driven neither by the primacy of denominations nor by fundamental discord between them. Instead, it thrived as part of a complex transatlantic system that bound religious institutions to imperial politics. As Katherine Carte argues, British imperial protestantism proved remarkably effect…
 
The Adventures of Sam Spade, Detective was a radio series based loosely on the private detective character Sam Spade, created by writer Dashiell Hammett for The Maltese Falcon. The show ran for 13 episodes on ABC in 1946, for 157 episodes on CBS in 1946–1949, and finally for 51 episodes on NBC in 1949–1951. The series starred Howard Duff (and later…
 
At the dawn of the 1950s, a promising and dedicated young painter named Helen Frankenthaler, fresh out of college, moved back home to New York City to make her name. By the decade's end, she had succeeded in establishing herself as an important American artist of the postwar period. In the years in between, she made some of the most daring, head-tu…
 
Every good story needs a villain, and some of the early chroniclers of the pilgrim and puritan settlements found all they needed for this type of character in Thomas Morton. Peter C. Mancall tells the story in The Trials of Thomas Morton: An Anglican Lawyer, His Puritan Foes, and the Battle for a New England (Yale UP, 2019), in what reads perhaps l…
 
Air Date: June 14-20, 2021 The Story of Deacon Jones & Fanny Brown This week, we take a look at two of the most famous “characters” from 1940s and ’50s R&B: Deacon Jones and Fanny Brown. Sometimes these two were referenced in the same song, as in “Good Rockin’ Tonight” and sometimes they got their own songs, as in Louis Jordan’s “Deacon Jones” and …
 
A new approach to puritan studies has been emerging in recent decades, but until now, no single volume has tried to gather in a comprehensive way the new histories of this literature. In A History of American Puritan Literature (Cambridge UP, 2020), edited by Kristina Bross and Abram Van Engen, eighteen leading scholars in the field help to mark a …
 
Twelve companies of American missionaries were sent to the Hawaiian Islands between 1819 and 1848 with the goal of spreading American Christianity and New England values. By the 1850s American missionary families in the islands had birthed more than 250 white children, considered Hawaiian subjects by the indigenous monarchy and U.S. citizens by mis…
 
Most music students have been taught that the New World Symphony was the first piece of classical music written in an American national style which Antonín Dvorák invented when he utilized influences from Black music in the second movement. The impression most textbooks leave is that this innovation was instantly approved by composers and critics a…
 
Despite enormous advances in medical science and public health education over the last century, access to health care remains a dominant issue in American life. U.S. health care is often hailed as the best in the world, yet the public health emergencies of today often echo the public health emergencies of yesterday: consider the Great Influenza Pan…
 
X Minus One is an American half-hour science fiction radio drama series that broadcast from April 24, 1955 to January 9, 1958 in various timeslots on NBC. Known for high production values in adapting stories from the leading American authors of the era, X Minus One has been described as one of the finest offerings of American radio drama and one of…
 
The title of Edward Westermann's new book, Drunk on Genocide: Alcohol and Mass Murder in Nazi Germany (Cornell University Press, published in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, 2021), suggests that it is about the use of alcohol by perpetrators of the Holocaust. And it is. Westermann documents extensively how alcohol serv…
 
Todd H. Weir and Hugh McLeod, two leading historians of religion, have teamed up to edit a volume in the Proceedings of the British Academy that explores how conflicts between secular worldviews and religions shaped the history of the 20th century. With contributions considering case studies relating to Judaism, Christianity, Islam, atheism and com…
 
Plato and the Mythic Tradition in Political Thought (Harvard UP, 2020) is an ambitious reinterpretation and defense of Plato’s basic enterprise and influence, arguing that the power of his myths was central to the founding of philosophical rationalism. Plato’s use of myths—the Myth of Metals, the Myth of Er—sits uneasily with his canonical reputati…
 
Boston Blackie is a fictional character created by author Jack Boyle (October 19, 1881 – October 1928). Blackie, a jewel thief and safecracker in Boyle's stories, became a detective in adaptations for films, radio and television—an "enemy to those who make him an enemy, friend to those who have no friend." Actor Chester Morris was the best-known Bl…
 
Edited by Dr. Cécile Fromont, Afro-Catholic Festivals in the Americas: Performance, Representation, and the Making of Black Atlantic Tradition (Penn State University Press, 2019), demonstrates how, from the beginning of the Atlantic slave trade, enslaved and free Africans in the Americas used Catholicism and Christian-derived celebrations as spaces…
 
Artwork as opposed to experiment? Engineer versus artist? We often see two different cultural realms separated by impervious walls. But some fifty years ago, the borders between technology and art began to be breached. In Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture (MIT Press, 2020), W. Patrick McCray shows how…
 
Holocaust and Genocide historians have spent much time and effort recently considering the connections between the experiences and ideas of colonialism and subsequent mass atrocity violence. Jonas Kreienbaum's recent book A Sad Fiasco: Colonial Concentration Camps in Southern Africa, 1900–1908 (Berghahn Books, 2019) is an important contribution to …
 
In the 1970s, American curator Donna Stein served as the art advisor to Empress Farah Diba Pahlavi, the Shahbanu of Iran. Together, Stein and Pahlavi generated an art market in Iran, as Stein encouraged Pahlavi’s patronage of the Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art. Today, the contemporary section of the Iranian National Collection―most of which cont…
 
In 1976, the San Francisco Giants headed north of the border and became the Toronto Giants - or so the sportswriters of the time would have you believe. In The Giants and Their City: Major League Baseball in San Francisco, 1976-1992 (Kent State UP, 2021), the journalist and scholar Lincoln Mitchell explains how the team and the city narrowly avoide…
 
Gunsmoke is an American radio and television Western drama series created by director Norman Macdonnell and writer John Meston. The stories take place in and around Dodge City, Kansas, during the settlement of the American West. The central character is lawman Marshal Matt Dillon, played by William Conrad on radio and James Arness on television. Wh…
 
Artwork as opposed to experiment? Engineer versus artist? We often see two different cultural realms separated by impervious walls. But some fifty years ago, the borders between technology and art began to be breached. In Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture (MIT Press, 2020), W. Patrick McCray shows how…
 
In the 1970s, American curator Donna Stein served as an art advisor to Empress Farah Diba Pahlavi, the Shahbanu of Iran. Together, Stein and Pahlavi generated an art market in Iran, as Stein encouraged Pahlavi’s patronage of the Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art. Today, the contemporary section of the Iranian National Collection―most of which conti…
 
In Another Aesthetics Is Possible: Arts of Rebellion in the Fourth World War (Duke UP, 2021), Jennifer Ponce de León examines the roles that art can play in the collective labour of creating and defending another social reality. Focusing on artists and art collectives in Argentina, Mexico, and the United States, Ponce de León shows how experimental…
 
May 29, 1949 - Jack Benny introduces all of the members of his cast and writers. Dennis sings his new song "Three Wishes" and guest Margret Whiting sings "Baby, It's Cold Outside (for a Lucky Strike)" with the Sportsmen Quartet. Jack compliments Mel Blanc on his new record "Big Bear Lake". References include ventriloquist Shirley Dinsdale and her d…
 
Today we are joined by Martha Moffitt Peacock, Professor of Art History at Brigham Young University about her new book, Heroines, Harpies, and Housewives: Imaging Women of Consequence in the Dutch Golden Age, out in 2020 with Brill. In Heroines, Harpies, and Housewives, Peacock provides a novel interpretive approach to the artistic practice of imag…
 
Abbott and Costello were an American comedy duo composed of comedians Bud Abbott and Lou Costello, whose work on radio and in film and television made them the most popular comedy team of the 1940s and early 1950s and the highest-paid entertainers in the world during World War II. Their patter routine "Who's on First?" is one of the best-known come…
 
Artemisia Gentileschi is by far the most famous woman artist of the premodern era. Her art addressed issues that resonate today, such as sexual violence and women’s problematic relationship to political power. Her powerful paintings with vigorous female protagonists chime with modern audiences, and she is celebrated by feminist critics and scholars…
 
Today we are joined by Martha Moffitt Peacock, Professor of Art History at Brigham Young University about her new book, Heroines, Harpies, and Housewives: Imaging Women of Consequence in the Dutch Golden Age, out in 2020 with Brill. In Heroines, Harpies, and Housewives, Peacock provides a novel interpretive approach to the artistic practice of imag…
 
During the mid-sixteenth century, English reformers invited a group of continental Protestant refugees to London and surrounding provinces. The ecclesiastical authorities allowed them liberty to establish their own churches with relatively little oversight by the English church. These "Stranger Churches," many of whom still maintained close ties to…
 
Matthew Karp is a historian of the U.S. Civil War era and its relationship to the nineteenth-century world. He received his Ph.D. in History from the University of Pennsylvania in 2011 and joined the Princeton faculty in 2013. The piece we are talking about is The Politics of a Second Gilded Age, published in February 2021 in The Jacobin. His first…
 
In this episode, Jane asks her Dad, Iain about his time in Ankara working for GCHQ. His post was senior, he was responsible for staff at the British Embassy in Ankara, and also 100 staff at the Black Sea site at Sinop. The posting was at a pivotal time for the Middle East, just ahead of the first Gulf War. Arguably, the start of the current wave of…
 
In his pioneering study, Men in Metal: A Topography of Public Bronze Statuary in Modern Japan (Brill, 2020), Sven Saaler examines Japanese public statuary as a central site of historical memory from its beginnings in the Meiji period through the twenty-first century. Saaler shows how the elites of the modern Japanese nation-state went about constru…
 
In his pioneering study, Men in Metal: A Topography of Public Bronze Statuary in Modern Japan (Brill, 2020), Sven Saaler examines Japanese public statuary as a central site of historical memory from its beginnings in the Meiji period through the twenty-first century. Saaler shows how the elites of the modern Japanese nation-state went about constru…
 
Exploring the concepts of collaboration, resistance, and postwar retribution and focusing on the Chetnik movement, Jelena Đureinović's book The Politics of Memory of the Second World War in Contemporary Serbia (Routledge, 2019) analyses the politics of memory. Since the overthrow of Slobodan Milosevic in 2000, memory politics in Serbia has undergon…
 
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