2018 Elections public
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Best 2018 Elections podcasts we could find (updated April 2020)
Best 2018 Elections podcasts we could find
Updated April 2020
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Purplish is CPR News' weekly podcast about state politics, state government, Colorado policy, and political identity. This season the show is hosted by public affairs reporters Bente Birkeland and Andrew Kenney. Each week while the legislature is in session, they'll break down the latest developments, look ahead to what's next, and dive into the bigger picture of what it all means for our not-red, not-blue, still pretty purple state.
 
We're a global consulting services company with over 7,000 specialized experts, but we are not your typical consultants. At ICF, business analysts and policy specialists work together with digital strategists, data scientists and creatives. We combine unmatched industry expertise with cutting-edge engagement capabilities to help organizations solve their most complex challenges. Since 1969, public and private sector clients have worked with ICF to navigate change and shape the future.
 
Features conversations with people who offer pieces of the puzzle of “a world that just might work” -- provocative approaches to business, environment, health, science, politics, media and culture. Guests have included Michael Lewis, Ken Burns, Arianna Huffington, Paul Krugman, Temple Grandin, Bill Maher, Cornel West, Doris Kearns Goodwin, and Norman Lear. [http://terrencemcnally.net]
 
Congressional Dish is a twice-monthly podcast that aims to draw attention to where the American people truly have power: Congress. From the perspective of a fed up taxpayer with no allegiance to any political party, Jennifer Briney will fill you in on the must-know information about what our representatives do AFTER the elections and how their actions can and will affect our day to day lives. Hosted by @JenBriney. Links to information sources available at www.congressionaldish.com
 
Katie Couric has questions. And on her new show, Next Question with Katie Couric, she’s determined to find answers—with a little help from the most captivating personalities in news, politics, and pop culture. For example: How did watching people play video games become a billion-dollar industry? Could CBD possibly be the key to overcoming pain and addiction? Does social media spur online radicalization? And what happens when at-home DNA tests reveal devastating family secrets? Join the awar ...
 
The Ticket: A Presidential Podcast from The Texas Tribune and KUT News. Each Week KUT's Ben Philpott and the Tribune's Jay Root provide a rundown of the week's campaign actions and bring you interviews with people who make a living working on, covering or commenting on the campaigns.
 
My Online Radio Program moved to AM Radio August 6, 2011. Since then, we've been on KCAA 1050 AM, and now we are on KMET 1490-AM on Saturdays at 1:00 pm (Constitution Radio with Douglas V. Gibbs). Old episodes of Political Pistachio Radio and Constitution Study Radio can be found here. Learn more about Douglas V. Gibbs at www.douglasvgibbs.com or www.politicalpistachio.com
 
Brothers butting heads in an entertaining yet enlightening discussion on subjects where others fear to tread. On the confirmation bias podcast you will hear your hosts, Keith and Kevin Ledig discuss news and current events. We will smack talk, fact check, and smash ignorance. Topics for discussion include but are not limited to social, racial, and LGBT issues, politics, religion, economics, and pretty much everything that affects you. Local, national and global news will be discussed. This i ...
 
BreakThru Radio Weekly is a weekly podcast that features regular contributors offering their views on major political and/or cultural topics of the day. Additionally, it features a weekly movie review and discussion, 1st Person stories from people we encounter on the streets of NYC, and a preview of a song from an upcoming episode of BTR Live Studio. Recurring segments and coverage: FILM FESTIVALS: Tribeca Film Festival 2019 (Part 1 & Part 2), New York Film Festival 2018 (Part 1 & Part 2), T ...
 
Tune in for thought-provoking conversations with smart, creative thinkers in the fields of benefits, economics, government, demography and more. This show is brought to you by the American Benefits Council, a Washington D.C. trade association that advocates for employers, connecting public policy and private-sector solutions to shape employee benefits for the evolving global workforce.
 
Who doesn’t like to sit around and get the tea from their friends? hmmmm....? I’ll wait. Bitch Let’s talk is a creative space where no topic is off limits, where you can be unapologetically you. We create the atmosphere that it is reminiscent of people having a convo at dinner or adult sleepovers. You will laugh, You will think outside the box, or even adopt some new ideas.
 
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show series
 
The attacks on the luxurious Taj Hotel in Mumbai in 2008 put Lashkar-e-Tayyaba, a jihadist terrorist group, in the international / Western spotlight for the first time, though they had been deadly active in India and Afghanistan for decades. In her book In Their Own Words: Understanding Lashkar-e-Tayyaba (Oxford University Press, 2018), Christine F…
 
The opposing powers had already suffered casualties on a scale previously unimaginable by October 1914. On both the Western and Eastern fronts elaborate war plans lay in ruins and had been discarded in favour of desperate improvisation. In the West this soon resulted in the remorseless world of the trenches; in the East all eyes were focused on the…
 
We've grown to understand in the past few weeks how worlds can change in just a few days. Peter Fritzsche's new book Hitler's First Hundred Days: When Germans Embraced the Third Reich (Basic Books, 2020) is an extraordinary examination of how, in just a few months, Germans got used to living around, among, and, mostly, in unity with, Nazis. Fritzsc…
 
The fear of campus sexual assault has become an inextricable part of the college experience. Research has shown that by the time they graduate, as many as one in three women and almost one in six men will have been sexually assaulted. But why is sexual assault such a common feature of college life? And what can be done to prevent it? Drawing on the…
 
Since COVID-19 began ravaging the human race, Congress has passed three bills into law that are meant to respond to both the health care crisis and the financial crisis. In this episode, Jen highlights the first two laws in their entirety and the provisions from the third law that are most likely to help the most Americans - the cash payments and u…
 
On a special edition of Meet the Press, Surgeon General Jerome Adams discusses new face mask recommendations. Gov. Jay Inslee (D-Wash.) and Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R-Ark.) talk about the different approaches they are taking in their states. Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte says he does not know when Italy's lockdown will end. Author Michael Lewis…
 
Bryan Schott and Bob Bernick discuss the latest Utah political headlines. Gov. Gary Herbert says he will call the Utah Legislature into a special session by the end of April so they can grapple with the economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic. Jobless claims spike in Utah because of the outbreak. Utah is teaming up with high-tech companies t…
 
Contributor Matt Ruby joins us to share his thoughts and experiences during the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. Later in the episode, Jacqueline Soller and I will discuss the new movie, ‘Swallow,’ directed by Carlo Mirabella-Davis and starring Haley Bennett -- available now from IFC Films. And we’ll take an exclusive early listen to a performance by New Y…
 
After the Second World War, an Australian diplomat was one of eight people to draft the U.N. Declaration of Human Rights. And in the years that followed, Australians of many different stripes—including activists fighting for Aboriginal rights and women’s rights, communists, and even anticommunists—invoked human rights in their respective political …
 
Arthur Asseraf’s Electric News in Colonial Algeria (Oxford University Press, 2019) examines the workings of the “news ecosystem” in Algeria from the 1880s to the beginning of the Second World War. The study of a society divided between a dominant (European) settler minority and an Algerian Muslim majority, the book tracks the development and impact…
 
Austerlitz, Wagram, Borodino, Trafalgar, Leipzig, Waterloo: these are the battles most closely associated with the Napoleonic Wars. But how did this period of nearly continuous warfare affect the world beyond Europe? The immensity of the fighting waged by France against England, Prussia, Austria, and Russia, and the immediate consequences of the tr…
 
Lane Windham, Associate Director of the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University, discusses her book, Knocking on Labor’s Door: Union Organizing in the 1970s and the Roots of a New Economic Divide (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), and why the 1970s should be seen as more than a moment of decline for t…
 
Psychiatry has always aimed to peer deep into the human mind, daring to cast light on its darkest corners and untangle its thorniest knots, often invoking the latest medical science in doing so. But, as Owen Whooley’s sweeping new book tells us, peering deep into the human mind is, well, really hard. On the Heels of Ignorance: Psychiatry and the Po…
 
In her fascinating and remarkable new book Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army (Stanford University Press, 2019), Kate Imy explores the negotiation of religious identity, military service, and imperial power in the context of twentieth century British India. How were preconceived British imperial notions of religion and…
 
In these unprecedented times, when tensions, anxieties and fears about the coronavirus are high, many people are finding comfort in a surprising source: Steven Soderbergh’s 2011 thriller “Contagion.” It’s about a mysterious and highly contagious virus that crosses continents, causes city-wide lockdowns, throws government protocols into chaos, upend…
 
The fact that secrecy and the concealment of information is important in today’s China is hardly a secret in itself, yet the ways that this secrecy is structured and sustained in such a vast society is not especially well understood. A lot more must be at play than simply the PRC state’s vast censorship apparatus when it comes to obscuring everythi…
 
Sanjib Baruah’s latest book In the Name of the Nation: India and its Northeast (Stanford University Press, 2020) completes a trilogy on India’s northeastern borderland region of which the first two are India Against Itself: Assam and the Politics of Nationality (1999) and Durable Disorder: Understanding the Politics of Northeast India (2005). Writi…
 
Jeff Forret is the author of William’s Gang: A Notorious Slave Trader and his Cargo of Black Convicts, published by Cambridge University Press in 2020. William’s Gang explores the career of prominent slave trader William H. Williams, whose operation was based in Washington D.C. His infamous Yellow House slave pin was a major stop in the domestic sl…
 
Sanjib Baruah’s latest book In the Name of the Nation: India and its Northeast (Stanford University Press, 2020) completes a trilogy on India’s northeastern borderland region of which the first two are India Against Itself: Assam and the Politics of Nationality (1999) and Durable Disorder: Understanding the Politics of Northeast India (2005). Writi…
 
In Kingdom of Nauvoo: The Rise and Fall of a Religious Empire on the American Frontier (W. W. Norton, 2020), Benjamin E. Park, an assistant professor at Sam Houston State University, examines a neglected part of the Mormon past -- the establishment of a thriving Latter-day Saint metropolis in Illinois. In Nauvoo, Park argues, the Mormons, under the…
 
In contemporary Manila, slums and squatter settlements are peppered throughout the city, often pushing right up against the walled enclaves of the privileged, creating the complex geopolitical pattern of what sociologist Marco Garrido calls the “patchwork city.” Synthesizing literature in political sociology and urban studies, Garrido shows how exp…
 
Latvia's elegant capital, Riga, is one of Europe's best-kept secrets. Strategically located on the Eastern Baltic coast at the mouth of the River Daugava, Riga was founded in the early 13th century as a trading hub, a military outpost of the Holy Roman Empire, and a base for Roman Catholic prelates to convert both the pagan natives and the Orthodox…
 
Kimberly A. Hamlin is an award-winning historian and associate professor in American studies at Miami University of Ohio. Her book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W. W. Norton, 2020) offers a fascinating biography of a little-known suffrage leader. Gardner began life as Alice Chenoweth. Moving away…
 
Coming of Age in Jim Crow DC: Navigating the Politics of Everyday Life (NYU Press, 2019) by Paula C. Austin, an Assistant Professor of history at Boston University, is not only a history of black youth in Washington D.C. in the 1930s but also a history of social science thought as illustrated in the work of scholars such as sociologists E. Franklin…
 
Kimberly A. Hamlin is an award-winning historian and associate professor in American studies at Miami University of Ohio. Her book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W. W. Norton, 2020) offers a fascinating biography of a little-known suffrage leader. Gardner began life as Alice Chenoweth. Moving away…
 
Did modern Hinduism truly emerge due to the “reforms” instigated by “progressive” colonial figures such as Rammohun Roy? Brian A. Hatcher's new book Hinduism Before Reform (Harvard University Press, 2020) challenges this prevalent notion. Aimed at sidestepping the obfuscating binary of “progressive” vs “traditional”, this book examines in tandem tw…
 
Global history records an astonishing variety of forms of social organization. Yet almost universally, males subordinate females. How does the relationship between men and women shape the wider political order? Valerie M. Hudson, Donna Lee Bowen, and Perpetua Lynne Nielsen's new book The First Political Order: How Sex Shapes Governance and National…
 
Global history records an astonishing variety of forms of social organization. Yet almost universally, males subordinate females. How does the relationship between men and women shape the wider political order? Valerie M. Hudson, Donna Lee Bowen, and Perpetua Lynne Nielsen's new book The First Political Order: How Sex Shapes Governance and National…
 
Managing Editor Bryan Schott and Contributing Editor Bob Bernick discuss the latest Utah political news. Former House Speaker Bob Garff dies from coronavirus. Gov. Gary Herbert's directive asking Utahns to stay home to prevent the spread of coronavirus has effectively ended signature gathering for candidates. A new poll shows Jon Huntsman and Spenc…
 
COVID-19 is an unprecedented public health emergency that has placed tremendous stress on the United States. As the crisis unfolds, with new information coming out daily, many state and local governments are left wondering what to do. What costs will the federal government cover, and how should you manage your emergency response efforts to make sur…
 
Christina Wolbrecht and J. Kevin Corder have a new book that builds on their previous work exploring women and suffrage in the United States, Counting Women’s Ballots: Female Voters from Suffrage through the New Deal (Cambridge University Press, 2016). A Century of Votes for Women: American Elections Since Suffrage (Cambridge University Press, 2020…
 
The city of Chicago is one of the US' most diverse cosmopolitan areas. Given the array of people who live in the city, it is reasonable to assume that the goals of the various communities differ in regard to sport and its social functions. Gerald R. Gems' new book, Sport and the Shaping of Civic Identity in Chicago (Lexington Books, 2020) provides …
 
So what is Western Civilization, anyway? The term itself is under assault from progressives, as if the very notion is somehow passé and is not inclusive enough in a globalized world. But, the fact is, our daily lives in the U.S and throughout much of the world are governed by core values and concepts that grow out of two inextricably linked aspects…
 
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