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Saints Gone Before is a weekly audiobook style podcast in 10-20 minute episodes where we read Christian texts from across the history of the church. Some readings will be sermons, others will be letters, or hymns, or prayers, or books. All of them are public domain. Episodes release every Monday morning!
 
"An Oral History of the Christian Church" by Adam Christman and Jonathan McCormick will deliver episodes by "volumes." Volume 1 is an oral history of the Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary campus relocation project. Postscript: GGBTS has since been renamed "Gateway Seminary of the Southern Baptist Convention." Volume 2 is on Historiography - the writing of history - ran November 2016 to February 2017. Volume 3 is on the Lutheran wing of the Protestant Reformation in honor of the 500th ...
 
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With a submission for the approval of the Midnight Society, we call this story “Holy Fortitude, or Remedies Against Fear,” a sermon by Isaac Watts. This sermon is number 31 in The Works of Isaac Watts D.D. in Nine Volumes, volume 1, published by Edward Baines in Leeds, England in 1812. You can search that PDF on archive.org if you’d like to read al…
 
With an appreciated breeze, Saints Gone Before is proud to present part 9 of Hannah More’s Essays on Various Subjects. Today’s reading is the final entry in this series. Hannah More lived in the 18th and 19th centuries, living life as a writer, abolitionist, and so much more. We gave a brief biography of Ms. More and this text back in episode 60, b…
 
With a minty freshness, we are proud to present part 8 of Hannah More’s Essays on Various Subjects, one I’ve been looking forward to reading with you. It’s the essay On the Importance of Religion to the Female Character. Ms. More lived in the 18th and 19th centuries, living life as a writer, philosopher, poet, abolitionist, and evangelical moralist…
 
With a pocket, got a pocketful of sunshine, I got a love, and I know it’s all mine, oh, oh whoa, we are proud to present part 7 of Hannah More’s Essays on Various Subjects, and this one has a long title. It’s the essay Thoughts on the Cultivation of the Heart and Temper in the Education of Daughters. Ms. More was a writer, philosopher, poet, abolit…
 
With a little summer rest behind us, Saints Gone Before are proud to present part 6 of Hannah More’s Essays on Various Subjects, the essay On True and False Meekness. Ms. More was a writer, philosopher, poet, abolitionist, and evangelical moralist. For more information about Ms. More and this text, you can listen to episode 60. Come back next time …
 
With the summer wind, come blowin’ in from across the sea, Saints Gone Before is proud to present part 5 of Hannah More’s Essays on Various Subjects, the essay on the danger of sentimental or romantic "connexions." Ms. More was a writer, philosopher, poet, abolitionist, and evangelical moralist. For more information about Ms. More and this text, yo…
 
With the entreaty to never tell us the odds, Saints Gone Before get to present part 4 of Hannah More’s Essays on Various Subjects, the essay "On Envy." Ms. More was a writer, philosopher, poet, abolitionist, and evangelical moralist. For more information about Ms. More and this text, you can check out episode 60. Get comfy, and try to stay content …
 
With questions about May showers vis a vis June flowers, Saints Gone Before is proud to present part 3 of Hannah More’s Essays on Various Subjects. Ms. More was a writer, philosopher, poet, abolitionist, and evangelical moralist. For more information about Ms. More and this text, you can check out episode 60. If you’re listening to this in the car,…
 
With the good sense to know that cinnamon doesn’t belong in enchiladas, we’re proud to present part 2 of Hannah More’s Essays on Various Subjects. Ms. More was a writer, philosopher, poet, abolitionist, and evangelical moralist. For more information about Ms. More and this text, you can check out our previous episode (no. 60). Requests for readings…
 
With a hope that carries us through the dark night of Good Friday, Saints Gone Before starts a new reading today. From our first female author for the show, the text is a compilation known as Essays on Various Subjects, all written by 18th century English writer and philanthropist Hannah More. Ms. More is known not only for her writing in general, …
 
With a severe shortage of chocolate, Saints Gone Before is proud to present part 5 of The First Epistle of Clement, starting with ch. 53 v. 1. Today’s reading completes the text. Joseph B. Lightfoot finished this translation in 1890. For more context on the letter, please listen to the opening for episode 55 of Saints Gone Before. Check us out in 2…
 
With the knowledge that I don’t have to carry the weight of who I’ve been, Saints Gone Before is reading part 4 of The First Epistle of Clement, starting with ch. 39 v. 1. Joseph B. Lightfoot finished this translation in 1890. For more context on the letter, please listen to the opening for episode 55 of Saints Gone Before. Our next episode will fi…
 
With a warm winter smile, Saints Gone Before is reading part 3 of The First Epistle of Clement, starting with ch. 24 v. 1 and ending with ch. 38. Joseph B. Lightfoot finished this translation in 1890. For more context on the letter, please listen to the opening for episode 55 of Saints Gone Before. Requests for readings: churchhistorypodcast (at) g…
 
With a welcome respite, Saints Gone Before presents part 2 of The First Epistle of Clement, starting with 14:1 and ending at 23:5. Joseph B. Lightfoot finished this translation in 1890. For more context on the letter, please listen to episode 55 of Saints Gone Before, the episode right before this one. Requests for readings: churchhistorypodcast (a…
 
With a cup of kindness yet, Saints Gone Before is kicking off 2018 with a reading of The First Epistle of Clement, or The First Epistle of Clement to the Corinthians, translated by Joseph B. Lightfoot in 1890. The purpose of the letter was to address the Corinthian church after several elders were charged and removed for what the Corinthians though…
 
With no gift to bring that’s fit to give the King, pa rum pa pum pum, Saints Gone Before offers a special “Saints at Christmas” episode. The titles and authors for each short text is located in the show notes. “A Creed for Christmas Worship.” It is adapted from Philippians 2:5-11 by Randolph W. Sly in vol. 5 of “The Complete Library of Christian Wo…
 
With a rudimentary lathe, Saints Gone Before is proud to present a reading of John Calvin’s “The Institutes of the Christian Religion.” This is the second reading of a short, two-part series consisting of Book Three, Chapter 7, “A Summary of the Christian Life. Of Self Denial.” The translation is by Henry Beveridge in 1845. Calvin’s Institutes have…
 
With a conspicuous flange, Saints Gone Before is proud to present a reading of John Calvin’s “The Institutes of the Christian Religion.” This is Book Three, Chapter 7, “A Summary of the Christian Life. Of Self Denial.” The translation is by Henry Beveridge in 1845. Calvin’s Institutes have a significant impact on Protestant theology starting with i…
 
With an inaugural year, Saints Gone Before is proud to present Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 18. The translation comes by Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Ch…
 
With an iridescent persimmon, Saints Gone Before is proud to present Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 17. The translation comes by Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catho…
 
“A mighty fortress is our God, a bulwark never failing; Our helper He, amid the flood of mortal ills prevailing: For still our ancient foe doth seek to work us woe; His craft and pow’r are great, and, armed with cruel hate, On earth is not his equal.” The tenth and final episode of our volume on the Lutheran wing of the Protestant Reformation compl…
 
With a carbonated cliche, Saints Gone Before is proud to present Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 16. The translation comes by Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic …
 
With a clanging hammer, Saints Gone Before is pleased to present The Ninety-Five Theses of Martin Luther. We’re reading the full text today, including the introductory letter, the theses themselves, and a closing protestation by Luther. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883…
 
"Somebody, can you tell me just what make a man feel this way? Like river without its water, like night without a day. And it sure 'nuff got cold after the rain fell, Not from the sky but from my eye." The ninth episode in our volume on the Lutheran wing of the Reformation focuses on the dark side of Martin Luther. We discuss his character flaws, t…
 
With an increasingly-loud tummy rumble, Saints Gone Before presents Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 15. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Ch…
 
With an unflappable owlet-nightjar, Saints Gone Before presents Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 14. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church…
 
“We don't need no education. We don't need no thought control. No dark sarcasm in the classroom. Teachers leave them kids alone.” Luther believed with urgency that every Christian should read and think about the Scriptures for oneself. When that belief grew legs, it walked him through the composition of lectures and two editions of a commentary on …
 
With an inimitable flugelhorn, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 13. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of hi…
 
With a sparkling howler monkey, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 12. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of h…
 
"Blackbird singing in the dead of night, take those sunken eyes and learn to see. All your life, you were only waiting for this moment to be free. Blackbird, fly." Jonathan and Adam talk about several more texts by Martin Luther, the good (including one about the Freedom of a Christian), and the bad. We also answered our first reader question! Toda…
 
With a vacillating anachronism, Saints Gone Before presents Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 11. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in …
 
With an acrobatic ferret, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 10 in this, our episode that answers the question to life, the universe, and everything. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in whi…
 
"She had taken his hand. She had become like they are. Come on, baby, don't fear the reaper..." Or, at least, that's one way of restating Luther's advice in one of the texts we discuss in today's episode describing and contextualizing four of this Reformer's works. And this is only part 1 of a two-part miniseries within this volume! Come back on Se…
 
With an upside-down ennui, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 9. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his rea…
 
With a superfluous corn fritter, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 8. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of h…
 
I hear the drums echoing tonight, But she hears only whispers of some quiet conversation... oh, wait, no, that's just the quill of Martin Luther, scrawling down his 95 Theses, the subject of our latest episode on Luther and the Protestant Reformation! We dig into the document, but we especially focus on context in which it arose, what it challenges…
 
With an envious hummingbird, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 7. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his r…
 
With an acerbic larynx, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 6. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readin…
 
He's the wolf screaming in the lonely night... Shout, shout, shout, shout at the devil! At least, that's what Martin Luther did. In his early years as a monk, Martin Luther became the best monk anyone had ever seen. But it wasn't enough. He struggled with the devil in quiet moments of torture over his sin, but eventually he truly got saved. How did…
 
With a buoyant melodrama, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 5. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his read…
 
With a frenetic ardor, Saints Gone Before presents Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 4. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of h…
 
Mood swings. Dramatic statements. Eating incredible volumes of food. You know, typical teenager stuff. Well, Martin Luther was no exception, as you'll hear in our new episode on this man's youth and his conversion story. We also hit you up with solid resources on the subject from primary to secondary even to tertiary sources (which you'll know how …
 
With an overt lucidity, Saints Gone Before presents to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 3. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in li…
 
With a curious enthusiasm, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 2. In this translation, it is rendered “The Babylonish Captivity of the Church.” The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. Previously, we read Luther’s “Letter to Pope L…
 
Ah, the lights. The music! The acting! Film connects us with its subjects in a special way. We're still celebrating the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. Thus, this time around, Jonathan and Adam talk about representations of Martin Luther's story in film, especially focused on the Joseph Fiennes movie "Luther" from 2003. The guys di…
 
A new series begins today! We're pleased to bring you Martin Luther's "On the Babylonian Captivity of the Church" to coincide with volume 3 of our other podcast, "An Oral History of the Church," in which we discuss the Lutheran Wing of the Reformation (episode 1 of volume 3 is available now!). Today's reading covers the introduction to the Luther t…
 
Could it be the end???!?!? It is! .....of BB Warfield's essay, "Calvin's Doctrine of the Knowledge of God." We found the essay in Calvin and the Reformation: Four Studies, published by Fleming H. Revell Company in 1909. Next week sees part 1 of Martin Luther's "The Babylonian Captivity of the Church." Also! Our other podcast, "An Oral History of th…
 
The boys are back in...recording mode as we launch volume 3 of An Oral History of the Church! If you're new to us, we have prepared a conversational church history podcast for our listeners. This time around, we're celebrating the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation with a volume devoted to a look at the Lutheran wing of the Reformation…
 
Presenting part 8 of BB Warfield's "Calvin's Doctrine of the Knowledge of God. Part 9 wraps us up next Monday! Announcement: Our other podcast, "An Oral History of the Church," returns on Friday! This volume will discuss the Lutheran wing of the Protestant Reformation. We're excited; we hope you enjoy it. The Warfield essay comes from Calvin and th…
 
"Ball of confusionnnnn!" Is that really what the world is today? Warfield tries to clear some up in today's reading. Today’s episode features part 7 of B. B. Warfield’s essay, “Calvin’s Doctrine of the Knowledge of God.” The essay comes from Calvin and the Reformation: Four Studies, published by Fleming H. Revell Company in 1909. Come back next wee…
 
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