show episodes
 
Heavy Lies the Helmet, LLC is an education company comprised of industry leaders still actively working in the fields of pre-hospital critical care and search and rescue. Through an IA MED partnership, we are an accredited podcast and blog that openly discusses the world of resuscitation and aviation. We highlight caring for critically ill and injured patients in addition to the controversies surrounding their management. Though tailored to the transport environment, our information is appli ...
 
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show series
 
Due to 'The Big C', ECHO Yacht Club was cancelled... but life goes on, and so does our podcast. We decided to turn lemons into lemonade and have our friend and emergency medicine powerhouse Dr. Sal Rezaie join us for a discussion based on what-would-have-been our Yacht Club presentation. Everyone carries a card that says they know how to manage tac…
 
Whether it's in regard to scope of practice, clinical judgment, or professional communication, transport is a very dynamic environment. We had the privilege of welcoming the infamous Dr. Cliff Reid to the show to discuss his and Sydney HEMS' approach to all of these areas. Tune in and learn how to be a high level transport provider from one of the …
 
Humanity has always been exposed to potentially catastrophic risks that might endanger the continued existence of humanity. Asteroid impacts or supervolcano eruptions come to mind. But since about the invention of the atomic bomb, humanity has been able to wipe itself out, adding self-made existential risks to the natural ones. Oxford philosopher T…
 
This could quite possibly be one of our most important podcast episodes to date featuring one of the most interesting persons in our industry. What is the opposite of complacency? And how do you know if you are? In this podcast episode, we are joined by Randy Mains, pilot and safety expert, to discuss all things Crew Resource Management (CRM) and t…
 
This could quite possibly be one of our most important podcast episodes to date featuring one of the most interesting persons in our industry. What is complacency? And how do you know if you are? In this podcast episode, we are joined by Randy Mains, pilot and safety expert, to discuss all things Crew Resource Management (CRM) and the human factors…
 
To conclude our detailed look at the ATLAS experiment, this episode looks at the computing infrastructure. We start out with the trigger systems that decide, very quickly, whether the data from a particular collision is worth keeping. We then discuss the reconstruction of the event, the simulation needed to understand the background as well as the …
 
High flow nasal cannula is an increasingly popular modality for Acute Respiratory Distress and Failure. Previously, we saw it used mostly in the pediatric population. But as time has went on, especially with the COVID-19 outbreak, this has become an effective means of O2 delivery in all patient groups. With its increased frequency of use, it is onl…
 
How do you calculate your drug dosages? What do you base it on? In this podcast episode, we are joined by Lynn Lamkin, EM pharmacist, to discuss weight based versus non-weight based drug dosages. We also breakdown when true body weight (TBW), ideal body weight (IBW), lean body weight (LBW) or adjusted body weight (ABW) is a more appropriate option.…
 
After understanding the history and development of ATLAS (and covering the LHC and particle physics in general) in previous episodes, we are now at the point where we can try to understand how a scientist uses the data produced by one of these large detectors and make sense of it. This is what we'll do in this episode with physicist (and listener) …
 
You asked. We answered. In a follow-up to our burn resuscitation podcast episode, we are joined by Chris Stevenson and his burn center Medical Director, Dr. Mike Feldman, to discuss inhalation injuries. Tune in as we discuss the mechanism surrounding inhalation injuries and how to treat them affectively based on anatomical location and poison type.…
 
ATLAS is one of the two general-purpose experiments at the LHC. It has been conceived, designed, and built over decades by hundreds of scientists and engineers from dozens of countries and hundreds of organizations. My guest, Peter Jenni, has been the head of the ATLAS collaboration for most of this time. In this episode we talk about science and e…
 
The Lockheed F-35 Lightning II is going to be more or less what the F-16 and F-18 are today: the backbone of the US and NATO land and sea-based air forces. It is a multi-role fighter, and one of its versions has the capability to take off with a very short roll and land vertically. Tucker "Cinco" Hamilton is a test pilot who has flown all three ver…
 
Titrating intravenous drips is a source of contention for many providers. This is, in part, due to a wide range of approaches depending on the patient's condition. Further attribution is based on each individual's comfort level and respective professional background (e.g. ICU versus EMS). But what does the literature say regarding this topic? In th…
 
In light of the current situation, we have decided to record a couple of episodes that cover some of the relevant background in terms of biology, medicine and healthcare. In this first episode we discuss emergency care and intensive care with a special focus on ventilation. We discuss these topics in general, and also specifically to COVID-19. Our …
 
A major component of particle accelerators like the LHC are the actual accelerators; the current approach relies on radio frequency cavities. However, their acceleration gradient, measured in Volts per meter, is limited. This means that future accelerators, especially linear ones, will become longer and longer to reach the desired energies. A new a…
 
Over the last two years, Markus wrote a book about some of the repeated topic covered on omega tau: SOFIA, Enterprise, Aerospace, Gravitational Waves, Telescopes, Models and Particle Physics. The book, called Once You Start Asking is now available as an ebook, with the softcover edition forthcoming. In this episode, Nora and Markus discuss the book…
 
With the rising number of COVID-19 patients, many of our listeners have requested additional information regarding transporting patients in the prone position. Despite refractory hypoxemia, many of these patients are benefiting from the prone position. Based on Episode 17 of the podcast, we updated our information in presentation-form. The followin…
 
Recently, Bryan was asked to present at a local EMS conference. The majority of the audience was ground personnel and student nurses, so he decided to present the why and how of measuring waveform capnography. EtCO2 truly should be the 5th vital sign, so we hope you appreciate this recording. ------------------------------------------------ Twitter…
 
Due to a recent outbreak, influenza and COVID-19 have been in the forefront of people's minds. Influenza, in particular, continues to affect all age groups despite it being late in the typical season. In this podcast episode, we discuss the entire course of this disease process; from positive nasopharyngeal swab to downstream ARDS and the complex v…
 
In this podcast episode, we are joined by Dr. Deep Sharma, Interventional Pulmonologist, to answer listener questions in a rapid fire format. We cover everything from modes of ventilation to respiratory decompensation to snorting sugar dust. You asked. He answers. ------------------------------------------------ Twitter @heavyhelmet Facebook @heavy…
 
Six years ago, in episode 150, Jochen Liske of ESO told us about the Extremely Large Telescope that is currently being built in Chile. This episode is a continuation (which is why this is a kind of bonus episode labelled as 150.5) in which Thomas Pfrommer tells us about how to control the optical path of this monster telescope: the 39 meter, 798-se…
 
Proper fluid management in burns is critical to survival. But what happens when we administer too little or too much fluid therapy? In this podcast episode, we are joined by Chris Stevenson to discuss epidemiology and appropriate resuscitation for the prehospital provider. Our discussion includes an assessment of past and current formularies and wh…
 
Suction-assisted laryngoscopy and airway decontamination (SALAD) was created to assist with the decontamination of a massively soiled airway. We sit down with flight nurse, researcher, and lead author Matt Jensen to discuss this technique and his most recent Air Medical Journal study aimed at investigating its usefulness in training prehospital eme…
 
The F-14 Tomcat is one of the most iconic fighters, certainly among its generation. In this episode we talk with Nick Pirnia about the aircraft's development and history as well as about flying it with former pilot Okie Nance. The aircraft is also available in the DCS flight simulator and the third part of this episode is a conversation with the de…
 
The Annual Sim Cup at the Air Medical Transport Conference (AMTC) is a prestigious event that gathers flight clinicians from all over the world to compete. Jason Peng (ED and Flight NP) and Ellen Parsley (Flight Nurse) of University of Cincinnati Air Care joined forces and took home the 1st place trophy at AMTC19. We use this opportunity to sit dow…
 
An important consequence of the warming of the planet due to climate change is that the frequency and/or severity of extreme weather events will increase. But how can we tell whether a particular event can be attributed to the changing climate? Would it have happened in "normal" climate as well, and if so, how would the event have been different? T…
 
RSI, chemical restraint, or physical restraint? In this podcast episode, we are joined by ED and Flight Nurse Nyssa Hattaway at AMTC19 to discuss medical management and aircraft safety considerations surrounding the patient with acute agitation, excited delirium, and/or drug-induced psychosis. We also touch on Droperidol; an old drug that is findin…
 
When I was in Bordeaux with the DLR to report about their science campaign in September, I also talked to the team from AirZeroG/Novespace about the technical and aviation aspects of parabolic flights. These interviews are in this episode. I chat with Jean-François Clervoy about the history of the company, with Eric Delesalle about piloting the par…
 
Making her second debut on the podcast, Dr. Cynthia Griffin joins us at AMTC19 to discuss the utility of ultrasound/POCUS. Cynthia presented on this topic and highlighted its indication when following your XABC's (Hemorrhage, Airway, Breathing, Circulation) exam. Are you currently using ultrasound in your practice? If not, are you actively trying t…
 
Marija Jovanovich is a pilot for the Royal Australian Air Force where she has been flying the P-3 Orion. We discuss the aircraft, the missions, and some anecdotes. Marija then also attended the USAF Experimental Test Pilot School, and we talk a bit about the experience of flying a wide range of different aircraft.…
 
As an air medical provider, our bread and butter is interfacility transports. Whether at the referring or receiving facility, we deal with Intensivists on a regular basis. What are their expectations? How can we provide the best care for our ICU level patients while simultaneously pleasing the facility staff? Our resident nocturnal Intensivist, Dan…
 
Earlier this year I visited the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, a European organization that produces global weather forecasts and performs research on how to improve those. The episode has three parts. First, Hilda Carr gives us an overview of the organization, its purpose and its history. Then I talk with Peter Bauer about wea…
 
In our final Guatemala Educational Aircrew Retreat (GEAR) 2019 podcast episode, we summarize the overall experience. G.E.A.R. was memorable, to say the least. It resulted in currency, competency, and confidence through camaraderie and collaboration. But what do Black Wolf Special Helicopter Operations, RED MED, and HeliSOS Servicios Medicos mean? W…
 
In July I visited the NATS tower at Heathrow Airport to interview my guest Adam Spink. We chatted about some of the mechanics of air traffic control at Heathrow and the unique ways of optimizing throughput. A few days later we met again on the tower of Fairford during RIAT 2019 and chatted about the specifics of ATC'ing during an airshow.…
 
Part 1 is on our other podcast platform, After the Call. In this podcast episode, we are again joined by survival experts Chris “Gibbo” Gibson and Jimmy “Jungle” McSparron to discuss the concept of tacticool. This common expression is regularly featured on social media when individuals inquire about various gear options for one’s person. We discuss…
 
With kick off our Guatemala Educational Aircrew Retreat (GEAR 2019) series with an open forum. Located at Guatemala's aviation training center, we sat in a mock airplane, pulled out the lapel mics, and decided to discuss the broad topic of survival. The morning after our jungle excursion inspired a multitude of discussions ranging from fire to surv…
 
I am interested in societal change: how can a complex society with lots of emergent (perhaps unintended) behaviors make a conscious change, such as transitioning to a more sustainable economy? We discussed this from an engineering perspective in the episode on Modeling Socio-Technical Systems, and we've looked at it historically in the episode on S…
 
A few months ago, a collaboration called the Event Horizon Telescope presented the first direct image of a black hole; or more specifically, of the radiation created by accelerated particles at its event horizon. The EHT is a Very Large Baseline Interferometer, in which radio telescopes all over the world are computationally connected to obtain res…
 
In this podcast episode, we are joined by Dr. Bill Hinckley to discuss advanced practice models in HEMS. Bill is a rare breed that defines "passion" in HEMS, to say the least. His experience coupled with being an overwhelmingly nice guy led to a lengthy discussion. We did not want to cheat your experience, so we split the podcast episode into two s…
 
Is the Registered Nurse/Paramedic crew configuration optimal for HEMS? In this podcast episode, we are joined by Dr. Bill Hinckley to discuss advanced practice models. Bill is a rare breed that defines "passion" in HEMS, to say the least. His experience coupled with being an overwhelmingly nice guy led to a lengthy discussion. We did not want to ch…
 
In June 2019 I had the pleasure and honor to fly in an F-16D with the USAF Thunderbirds. The episode covers the medical briefing about how to prevent motion sickness and how to deal with Gs, suiting up with flight suit, g-suit, harness, helmet and mask, the briefing with my pilot Maj. Jason Markzon, the flight itself with commentary, an interview a…
 
In this podcast episode, we are joined by Flight Physician Mike Abernethy to discuss the importance of high fidelity, simulation training. We discuss common pitfalls of simulation learning, EMS education, and highlight tips and tricks for building successful moulage; the art of applying mock injuries for the purpose of training emergency response t…
 
In May I visited ALICE, one of the four large experiments at the LHC and talked with Despina Hatzifotiadou. We briefly discussed the science that ALICE is interested in, and then spent the majority of the time dissecting the detector to understand its components and how they detect the various products of particle collisions.…
 
Armchair Air is at it again with this is the second installment of the "Breaking the Case" series where we discuss case studies related to previously covered topics. Even though some content from Episode 33 - P.E. MERGENCY is reviewed, we recommend listening to it before proceeding. It will provide the foundation needed to understand the concepts t…
 
Socio-technical systems are systems where (groups of) humans interact with (non-trivial) technical systems; an example is the power grid. The people, the technical system and the combination might easily lead to complex behavior that is hard to predict and control over the long term. However, as illustrated by, for example, the need to transition o…
 
Earlier this year, we were asked to present at a local critical care conference. Due to the recent release of the 1-hour bundle, this was a timely discussion regarding pre-hospital sepsis. We touched on various definitions, diagnostics, treatments, and the ongoing controversy surrounding the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. Since we try to record most of…
 
Earlier this year I visited the London Air Ambulance, a charity organization that flies two MD-902 helicopters over the UK's capital. I chatted with their chief pilot Neil Jeffers about the flying and some of the medical aspects. My recorder then joined Neil on a short flight to their hangar at RAF Northolt. There, we met Adam Spink, a NATS air tra…
 
Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the main event. This long awaited, highly anticipated match-up is finally here. Dan received feedback, after giving a recent talk, that we wanted to address in a fun way. What causes peri-intubation hypotension and death? Is positive pressure ventilation (PPV) or induction agents the primary contributing factor? Tun…
 
In our never-ending quest to understand fusion and its potential use in energy production, I visited the Wendelstein 7-X fusion experiment in Greifswald run by the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik. We started out with a visit to the experiment hall, while experimentalist Matthias Hirsch gave us an overview over the machine. Next we discussed th…
 
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