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Best Ancient History podcasts we could find (updated July 2020)
Best Ancient History podcasts we could find
Updated July 2020
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Learn about ancient Egypt, as *they* described it. We use ancient texts, archaeology and social history to explore their civilization and weave a tale of pharaohs, pyramids, gods, monuments and people. The History of Egypt Podcast uses the ancients' own words to describe their society, and is written by a trained Egyptologist. A member of the Agora Podcast Network.
 
In "Hardcore History" journalist and broadcaster Dan Carlin takes his "Martian", unorthodox way of thinking and applies it to the past. Was Alexander the Great as bad a person as Adolf Hitler? What would Apaches with modern weapons be like? Will our modern civilization ever fall like civilizations from past eras? This isn't academic history (and Carlin isn't a historian) but the podcast's unique blend of high drama, masterful narration and Twilight Zone-style twists has entertained millions ...
 
The History of Ancient Greece Podcast is a deep-dive into one of the most influential and fundamental civilization in world history. Hosted by philhellene Ryan Stitt, THOAG spans over two millennia. From the Bronze Age to the Archaic Period, from Classical Greece to the Hellenistic kingdoms, and finally to the Roman conquest, this podcast will tell the history of a fundamental civilization by bringing to life the fascinating stories of all the ancient sources and scholarly interpretations of ...
 
The Historical Blindness podcast is a discussion of interesting and largely forgotten stories from our past, with a specific focus on demonstrating the inscrutability, the ineffability, and the unknowability of the past. By examining cases of outrageous hoaxes, mass hysteria, baffling mysteries and unreliable historiography, we raise the question, “Can we trust history as we have received it?”
 
This podcast is an introduction to Anglophone literature, from ancient times to the present, done by a Ph.D. with lots of books and musical instruments. A typical episode offers a summary of a work, or part of a work of literature, followed by some historical analysis. The episodes include original music, some comedy songs, and goofy jokes. You can listen to the shows in any order, although from time to time, episodes will make brief mention of previous or upcoming ones.
 
A podcast dedicated to the history of Persia, and the great empires that ruled there beginning with the Achaemenid Empire of Cyrus the Great and the foundation of an imperial legacy that directly impacted ancient civilizations from Rome to China, and everywhere in between. Join me as we explore the cultures, militaries, religions, successes, and failures of some of the greatest empires of the ancient world. All credits available on the website (https://historyofpersiapodcast.com/) Support th ...
 
Mongol Invasions, Napoleonic Wars, Diadochi Wars, Rome and the Cold War. Every part of your life -the words you speak, the ideas you share- can be traced to our history, but how well do you really know the stories? We’ll take you to the events, the times and the people that shaped our world. Hosted by David Schroder for Kings and Generals.
 
Dan and Bernie discuss the events of ancient history all over the world, decade per decade, starting at 1000 BC and moving forwards. Learn all about the Assyrians, the Babylonians, the mighty Pharaohs and the great kings of the Zhou Dynasty and more. Meet personalities like Ashurnasirpal II, Homer, Sennacherib, king Mu and the Buddha.
 
Where did we come from? One of humanity's most basic questions, the answer is fascinating. Weaving together insights from the fields of genetics, archaeology, linguistics, and paleoanthropology, hosts Spencer Wells and Razib Khan take us on a grand tour of human history. Scientific storytelling at its best.
 
A layman's guide to a 150 years of research into the history presented in the Bible. I explore the religion of ancient Israel, and the development of Christianity through to the death of Paul. I discuss every single book in every Bible (there are more than you think!) Lightly garnished with a dash of drollery, a soupcon of scrutiny, and not one ounce of objectivity. Not one ounce! Episodes are released every third Sunday.
 
The Maritime History Podcast is a chronological look at maritime history and its numerous facets. Beginning with ancient history, the podcast looks at trade, exploration, boat and ship-building, economics, and the relationship between the ocean and the development of society and culture throughout history. Learn more about the podcast at http://maritimehistorypodcast.com.
 
The podcast that transports you to the ancient world and back, with some good conversation along the way. It's not just about ancient Greece. It's about a huge chunk of human history that the Greek texts give us access to: from Egypt and Babylon, to Persia, to Carthage and Rome, we'll sail the wine-dark sea of history with some expert guides at the helm. Topics will include archaeology, literature, and philosophy. New episode every month.
 
Barbarians, political breakdown, economic collapse, mass migration, pillaging and plunder. The fall of the Roman Empire has been studied for years, but genetics, climate science, forensic science, network models, and globalization studies have reshaped our understanding of one of the most important events in human history. PhD historian and specialist Patrick Wyman brings the cutting edge of history to listeners in plain, relatable English.
 
We explore ideas and practices once believed to be true but no longer. Each dead idea is explored in all its glorious eccentricity. For example, discover miasma, the theory that plague comes from stinky air; or the medical diagnosis of hysteria, which holds that women's wombs wander around their bodies causing trouble. Join us on a fun romp through the history of ideas that didn’t quite stand the test of time.
 
Most true crime covers the past hundred years of recorded history. We cover the rest of it. From murderous knights and pirate kings to ancient Chinese forensic investigators and the Renaissance's literal fashion police, our episodic podcast dives deep into the historical characters and events that make up some of the greatest crimes the world has ever seen — and certainly not found in your textbooks. For more information visit https://www.highcrimesandhistory.com/
 
The Art of War is a 6th Century BC Chinese treatise on war and military strategy known for its timeless examples of strategy and planning. There is intense interest in this ancient work since it teaches how to be victorious in conflict and that the final victory ultimately is to see war as an effort to win minds and hearts rather than a mere acquisition of territory and wealth. The Art of War by Sun Tzu is a two thousand year old work, reputedly authored by a famous military general and stra ...
 
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This episode features a presentation that Ben Jacobs (trained urban planner and host of the Wittenberg of Westphalia podcast) and Ryan Stitt (trained Ancient Greek and host of The History of Ancient Greece podcast) gave at Intelligent Speech 2020, a virtual conference for podcast producers and consumers. We discuss the form and function of cities i…
 
What did it take to be a gladiator? Who ended up in the arena, and why? And how did the gladiatorial games—one of the bloodiest sporting events known in the ancient world—come to be?From the ancient roots of Etruscan funeral games to the height of Roman spectacle, we examine the history of gladiatorial combat—and explore what life was like for glad…
 
In this episode we square off against some of the many, many puzzles remaining about who and when we came from, including: 0:00 - 0:58 Intro 0:58 - 4:30 The Hominins 4:30 - 6:52 The Earliest Ancestral Human 6:52 - 22:50 The Mystery and Controversy of H. naledi 22:50 - 41:40 The Walking Anachronisms of Red Deer Cave 41:40 - END The Final Fate of the…
 
Check out this book here https://amzn.to/2B0MNTC Dr. Monica Bontty is a professor of archaeological studies and ancient history. She teaches at the University of Louisiana-Monroe and she wrote a book on misconceptions about Ancient Rome. We spoke about the ancient Roman military from the Republic to the Empire and the research she did for the book.…
 
As a matter of basic metaphysics, we classify individuals in terms of their relations to other things – for example, a parent is a parent of someone, a larger object is larger than a smaller object. The nature of relativity – the question of how things relate to other things – is a topic that winds its way through the history of philosophy to the p…
 
Juan Francisco Manzano and Gabriel de la Concepción Valdés (Plácido) were perhaps the most important and innovative Cuban writers of African descent during the Spanish colonial era. Both nineteenth-century authors used Catholicism as a symbolic language for African-inspired spirituality. Likewise, Plácido and Manzano subverted the popular imagery o…
 
In Michelangelo’s Inner Anatomies (Penn State University Press), Christian Kleinbub challenges the notion that Michelangelo, renowned for his magnificent portrayals of the human body, was merely concerned with “superficial” anatomy—that is, the parts of the body that can be seen from the outside. Providing a fresh perspective on the artist’s portra…
 
“What makes song sparrows, Verdi, medieval monks, and minstrelsy part of the same taxonomy?” So asks—and answers—Rachel Mundy, who is Assistant Professor of Music at Rutgers University–Newark. In her book, Animal Musicalities: Birds, Beasts, and Evolutionary Listening (Wesleyan University Press, 2018), Mundy shows how the history of the humanities …
 
In this episode, we focus on one of Eisler’s most controversial works, a reconstruction of the 1st-century Roman Jewish historian Josephus’ account of the events surrounding the death of Jesus and the ministry of John the Baptist, including a new physical description of Jesus that apparently prompted the Christ to appear to followers in America to …
 
Check out this book here https://amzn.to/3e5qbza Scott Lingamfelter was a senior Artillery Officer and Middle East expert when he participated in the First Gulf War as XO of 1st ARTY. He wrote a book detailing his time in that war, including tactical and operational issues, and his thoughts about the geopolitical and strategic aspects of the war. W…
 
In today's episode we get heroically pummeled by one of the most intractable -- and maybe insoluble -- mysteries of our existence. A topic that strikes at the core of who we are and what it means to be human. A short intro to and history of the problem of consciousness. What it is, what it does, how it can (possibly, ever?) be explained, and why it…
 
From Anatolia to Central China; from northern Korea to the eastern edge of Europe; from the forests of Siberia to the borders of India. This was the empire of Grand Khan Mongke, perhaps the single most powerful monarch in history. No other king, sultan or emperor could compare to the sheer swath of humanity that Mongke ruled over, a man who reforme…
 
Child labour, plague, and dark deeds at Amarna. By regnal year 14 (c.1349 BCE) Akhenaten's capital city had grown to almost thirty thousand people. This massive growth carried a price, one that archaeologists are finding in the city's vast cemeteries... Date c.1349 BCE www.egyptianhistorypodcast.com Music by Keith Zizza www.keithzizza.com Music by …
 
Today I spoke with Professor Peter J. Boettke, co-author of Public Governance and the Classical-Liberal Perspective (Oxford University Press, 2019) with Paul Dragos Aligica and Vlad Tarko. Dr Boettke is University Professor of Economics and Philosophy, Director of the F. A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, at…
 
On this episode of the New Books Network, Dr. Lee Pierce (she/they) interviews Dr. Ruth Leys (she/hers), Professor Emeritus of Johns Hopkins University, on The Ascent of Affect: Genealogy and Critique (University of Chicago Press, 2017). In recent years, emotions have become a major, vibrant topic of research not merely in the biological and psycho…
 
Friend of the podcast Evie Lee joins Jacke to take a look at Joyce Carol Oates's classic short story, "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been" (1966). NOTE TO LISTENERS: This episode contains disturbing descriptions of an attempted abduction by a serial killer. Please exercise discretion in deciding whether to listen.Help support the show at patr…
 
Back when Christians heeded the command to proselytize, tools for conversion were many and varied. The gospel harmony analyzed in this book was one such, and it offers insights into both their culture, and our culture. (The written version of this review, in web, PDF, and ebook formats, can be found here.)…
 
In a time of contentious debate over Confederate monuments, Nicole Maurantonio (Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Communication studies and American Studies at the University of Richmond) provides an intriguing look into how revisionist ideas of the Confederacy have seeped into mainstream culture. Based in Richmond, the former capital of the Conf…
 
In this guest episode, Alexis teaches Alyssa about Dorothy Dandridge, a beautiful black actress with a heartbreaking life. Special thanks to our patrons: Kathleen, Katelynn, Ashley, Loreena & Josh, Gamy, Sadie, Natalie, Natalya, Daniel, Michael, Julia, Kara, Macoy, Coffee Infused Nerd, Abigail, Polly, Jill, McKenzie, Erica, Laura, Lizzy, Travis, Va…
 
Ahmed El-Shamsy’s Rediscovering the Islamic Classics: How Editors and Print Culture Transformed an Intellectual Tradition (Princeton University Press, 2020) is an astonishing scholarly feat that presents a detailed, sophisticated, and thoroughly enjoyable intellectual and social history of the modern publishing industry on what we today consider ca…
 
We've gotten way behind on listener emails because of the guests on the last three shows, so after we open some 1up boxes and do the drawing for the SnakeBros Hat prize, we read through a lot of excellent emails that spark conversation on many topics. In the third segment Kyle reads some articles on recent information about the rings of Saturn, vol…
 
Today Jana Byars talks to Lucy Delap, Reader in Modern British and Gender History at Murray Edwards College, Cambridge University, about her new book Feminisms: A Global History (University of Chicago Press, 2020). This outstanding work, available later this year, takes a thematic approach to the topic of global feminist history to provide a unifie…
 
Check out this book here https://amzn.to/2ZnM73r Boaz Dvir is a journalist, writer, and filmmaker. He spent ten years researching the creation of the Israeli Air Force in 1948. He produced a documentary on the subject titled “A Wing and a Prayer” which was shown on PBS. He then wrote a book on the subject. We spoke about the Israeli Air Force of 19…
 
With Black Lives Matter protesters focusing on toppling Confederate monuments, and talking heads on the right calling efforts to legislate the removal of these monuments to slavery an attempt to "destroy history," and Trump making executive orders to protect them, this episode from 2017 is especially relevant again. Thanks Diane for suggesting I re…
 
70 years ago, the philosopher Theodore Adorno and a team of scholars released a massive book titled The Authoritarian Personality (Verso, 2019), which attempted to map the psychological and emotional dynamics of those who might find themselves seduced by authoritarianism. The book synthesized both empirical psychology and sociology, relying on mass…
 
Keynes was not only an economist but the preeminent anti-authoritarian thinker of the 20th century, one who devoted his life to the belief that art and ideas could conquer war and deprivation. As a moral philosopher, political theorist, and statesman, Keynes led an extraordinary life that took him from intimate turn-of-the-century parties in London…
 
Matthew, Mark, Luke and John are the heart of the New Testament. And today, historians and Biblical scholars know more about them than ever before. Episode 77 Quiz: http://literatureandhistory.com/index.php/episode-77-quiz Episode 77 Transcription: http://literatureandhistory.com/index.php/episode-077-the-gospels Bonus Content: http://literatureand…
 
Especially in modern textbooks and broad historical surveys, the Mongol withdrawal from Europe in 1242 is presented as the Mongols ‘disappearing into the mists of the east,’ as far as the Europeans were concerned. But in the immediate wake of the 1242 withdrawal, Europeans needed to know more about this new foe. Rather than a ‘Mongol disappearance’…
 
The Hasidic leader R. Nachman of Braslav (1772–1810) has held a place in the Jewish popular imagination for more than two centuries. Some see him as the (self-proclaimed) Messiah, others as the forerunner of modern Jewish literature. Existing studies struggle between these dueling readings, largely ignoring questions of aesthetics and politics in h…
 
Author Lara Prescott joins Jacke to talk about her novel The Secrets We Kept, which is based on the incredible but true story of the CIA's efforts to use a novel (Boris Pasternak's Doctor Zhivago) as part of its Cold War battle against the Soviet Union.LARA PRESCOTT is the author of The Secrets We Kept, an instant New York Times bestseller and a He…
 
The greatest mercenary commander of the 14th century, inspiration for historians, poets, novelists and playwrights, John Hawkwood is a name everyone should know. 14th century Europe was a plagued with incessant warfare. The Hundred Years' War began between France and England in 1337 and would last until the middle of the next century. Other conflic…
 
The final chapters of Acts are a rollicking adventure where Paul endures storms and shipwreck on his way to trial in Rome. Paul spends two years in Rome, insulting the local Jews to their faces. So abruptly ends the Book of Acts. In his letter to the Phillipians, Paul changes his mind about the afterlife. According to the 2nd letter to Timothy, Pau…
 
This episode features the Ancient History Panel at Intelligent Speech 2020, a virtual conference for podcast producers and consumers. Participants included Ryan Stitt (The History of Ancient Greece podcast), Jamie Redfern (The History Of: Alexander and The History Of: Hannibal podcasts), Dominic Perry (The History of Egypt podcast), and Jenny Willi…
 
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