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Best Anthropology Podcasts We Could Find
Best Anthropology Podcasts We Could Find
These Anthropology podcasts cover everything from geology, biodiversity, uncommon knowledge about humans, culture, history, humanity’s potential and more ⁠— so explore these podcasts at your own leisure and you won’t be disappointed!
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Life is complicated, but we love simple answers. AI and robotics are changing the nature of work. Emojis change the way we write. Fossil Fuels were once the engine of progress, now we're in a race to change how we power the planet. We're constantly trying to save ourselves...from ourselves. This Anthro Life brings you smart conversations with humanity’s top makers and minds to make sense of it all. We dig into our creative potential through design, culture, and technology. Change your perspe ...
 
A podcast about life, the universe and anthropology produced by David Boarder Giles, Timothy Neale, Cameo Dalley, Mythily Meher and Matt Barlow. Each episode features an anthropologist or two in conversation, discussing anthropology and what it has to tell us in the twenty-first century. This podcast is made in partnership with the American Anthropological Association and with support from the Faculty of Arts & Education at Deakin University.
 
The Familiar Strange is a podcast about doing anthropology: that is, about listening, looking, trying out, and being with, in pursuit of uncommon knowledge about humans and culture. Find show notes, plus our blog about anthropology's role in the world, at https://www.thefamiliarstrange.com. Twitter: @tfsTweets. FB: facebook.com/thefamiliarstrange. Instagram: @thefamiliarstrange. Brought to you by your familiar strangers: Ian Pollock, Jodie-Lee Trembath, Julia Brown, Simon Theobald, Kylie Won ...
 
What makes us human? How are we different from chimpanzees? Who are our earliest ancestors and how do we know? Origin Stories is The Leakey Foundation’s podcast about how we became human. This award-winning show combines science and narrative to explore our human story and explain why we are the way we are. Listen and explore human evolution one story at a time.
 
The Anthropocene is the current geological age, in which human activity has profoundly shaped the planet and its biodiversity. On The Anthropocene Reviewed, #1 New York Times bestselling author John Green (The Fault in Our Stars, Turtles All the Way Down) reviews different facets of the human-centered planet on a five-star scale. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with A ...
 
An original podcast brought to you by the graduate students of the Department of Anthropology at The Ohio State University. Join us once as we explore the human experience! We are now a part of the Anthropology Public Outreach Program at The Ohio State University. Follow us @ohiostateAPOP
 
The University of Oxford is home to an impressive range and depth of research activities in the Humanities. TORCH | The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities is a major new initiative that seeks to build on this heritage and to stimulate and support research that transcends disciplinary and institutional boundaries. Here we feature some of the networks and programmes, as well as recordings of events, and offer insights into the research that they make possible.
 
Hi, I’m Dax Shepard, and I love talking to people. I am endlessly fascinated by the messiness of being human, and I find people who are vulnerable and honest about their struggles and shortcomings to be incredibly sexy. I invite you to join me as I explore other people’s stories. We will celebrate, above all, the challenges and setbacks that ultimately lead to growth and betterment. What qualifies me for such an endeavor? More than a decade of sobriety, a degree in Anthropology and four year ...
 
Scientist. Activist. Storyteller. Icon. Jane Goodall blazed the trail and changed the world. Now, she's studying new subjects – humans! This brand-new podcast will take listeners on a one-of –a-kind journey as they learn from Dr. Goodall's extraordinary life, hear from changemaking guests from every arena, and become awed by a growing movement sparked by Jane and fueled by hope. Join us as we get curious, grow compassion and take action to build a better world for all.
 
Lore and Legends explores humanities past, present, and future through the lense of the lore and legends built up by dominant cultures like Ancient Egypt, Greece, and more forgotten or ignored groups like the Native Americans or Tribal Africans, as well as modern myths, legends, and phenomena from bigfoot, to UFO's, psychic powers and even religions.... https://www.loreandlegends.net
 
Tired of entrenched view tribalism and binary debates? A psychologist, a philosopher, and an anthropologist walk into a podcast to air out some echo chambers, and try and a fresh perspective on the most controversial political, social and psychological debates. It's not about Left vs. Right, Us Vs. Them or Good vs. Evil. It's all about dialogue and beyond binary thinking!
 
An exiled Northern Irish anthropologist and a hitchhiking Australian psychologist take a close look at the contemporary crop of 'secular gurus', iconoclasts, and other exiles from the mainstream, offering their own brands of unique takes and special insights. Leveraging two of the most diverse accents in modern podcasting, Chris and Matt dig deep into the claims, peek behind the psychological curtains, and try to figure out once and for all... What's it all About? Join us, as we try to puzzl ...
 
How is it that two opposites can share the same brain? Pete, from Melbourne, Australia, Jen, from New York City, USA. Pete, at 6”7’, Jen, at 5”1”. Pete, the human periscope, Jen, the human stethoscope. Pete, the millennial, Jen, the Gen-X. Pete, at inbox zero, Jen, at inbox chaos. Pete, who wears jumpers, Jen, who wears sweaters. The Long and The Short Of It is a product of these differences. It’s a weekly podcast for curious folks ready to explore the art and science of being human from eve ...
 
Where did we come from? One of humanity's most basic questions, the answer is fascinating. Weaving together insights from the fields of genetics, archaeology, linguistics, and paleoanthropology, hosts Spencer Wells and Razib Khan take us on a grand tour of human history. Scientific storytelling at its best.
 
Science Talk is a weekly science audio show covering the latest in the world of science and technology. Join Steve Mirsky each week as he explores cutting-edge breakthroughs and controversial issues with leading scientists and journalists. He is also an articles editor and columnist at Scientific American magazine. His column, "Antigravity," is one of science writing's great humor venues. Also check our daily podcast from Scientific American : "60-Second Science." To view all of our archived ...
 
How does work culture shape human behavior and experience? How do humans create cultures? From uncomfortable truths to heart-to-heart conversations, Culture First uncovers what it really takes to build a better world of work. We all aspire to rise above the day-to-day commotion and bring more humanity into our work lives. Our host Damon Klotz is dedicated to understanding how we find meaning in our work and how to better the experience humans have within organizations. Join him as he explore ...
 
Anthropological Airwaves is the official podcast of the journal American Anthropologist. Building on the journal’s commitment to four-field, multimodal research, we host conversations about anthropological projects, from fieldwork and publishing to the discipline’s role in public debates. We aim to ask a series of fundamental questions about past, present, and future disciplinary practice, and to learn from those who chart new paths for a more broadly engaged anthropology.
 
The Anthropology in Business podcast is for anthropologists and business leaders interested in learning more about the many ways anthropology is applied in business and why business anthropology is one of the most effective lenses for making sense of organizations and consumers. It is hosted by Matt Artz, a business anthropologist specializing in design anthropology and working at the intersection of product management, user experience, and business strategy. To learn more about the Anthropo ...
 
What makes you … you? Is it your DNA, culture, environment? SAPIENS hosts Jen Shannon, Esteban Gómez, and SAPIENS.org Editor-in-Chief Chip Colwell speak with anthropologists from around the globe to help us uncover what makes us human. Subscribe now to learn more. The SAPIENS podcast is supported by the Wenner-Gren Foundation and produced by House of Pod.
 
AnthroDish is a weekly show about the intersections between our foods, cultures, and identities. Host Sarah Duignan sits down one-on-one with folks in academia, hospitality, farming and agriculture, and more to learn about their food knowledge and experiences. If you're interested in the unique and fascinating lives of everyday people who have been shaped by their relationship with food, this show is for you!
 
Online Gods is a monthly podcast on digital cultures and their political ramifications, featuring lively conversations with scholars and activists. Presented by anthropologist Ian M. Cook, the podcast is a key initiative of the five year ERC project ONLINERPOL www.fordigitaldignity.com led by media anthropologist Sahana Udupa at LMU Munich, and cohosted by HAU Network for Ethnographic Theory. Online Gods represents our collective commitment to multimedia diffusion of research in accessible a ...
 
If you want to understand how social scientists’ study human behaviour, how industry innovates or want to know more about how they can successfully work together and enhance each other, then you have come to the right place! Join our hosts as they engage with anthropologists, other researchers and industry specialists from all over the world. The discussions will be about their specific work in understanding people and how they apply that understanding to advance industry, scholarship and/or ...
 
#zimlove is a podcast where I, a foreigner who has been living and working in Zimbabwe for a couple years, tries to explain through the eyes of others, why I fell in love with this country. When I try to describe the beauty and diversity of this place, I fail because I cannot compete with hyperinflation and expensive safaris, which is the only thing that google spits out once you type in "Zimbabwe". In this podcast each person describes one true perspective on Zimbabwe from their own reality ...
 
Volcanoes. Trees. Drunk butterflies. Mars missions. Slug sex. Death. Beauty standards. Anxiety busters. Beer science. Bee drama. Take away a pocket full of science knowledge and charming, bizarre stories about what fuels these professional -ologists' obsessions. Humorist and science correspondent Alie Ward asks smart people stupid questions and the answers might change your life.
 
This podcast series questions the promise and ideal of interdisciplinarity by looking at travelling concepts: concepts that travel within and across academic disciplines. The two Utrecht University- based hosts - Tessa Diphoorn and Brianne McGonigle Leyh - will invite two scholars each month to discuss a particular concept and explore how, if, and why such concepts have travelled.
 
In this podcast, I’m going to chat with the interesting, remarkable, and sometimes downright crazy people I’ve met from my travels and time living abroad. I’ve spent a good part of my adult life traveling, and the last decade living in places like Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Cambodia, Thailand, and the Philippines.During that time, I’ve run into some of the most amazing people you can imagine. This podcast is a forum for me to share their voices, their stories, and give you a glimpse into their l ...
 
The British Academy is the UK’s national academy for the humanities and social sciences. We mobilise these disciplines to understand the world and shape a brighter future. ​ From artificial intelligence to climate change, from building prosperity to improving well-being – today’s complex challenges can only be resolved by deepening our insight into people, cultures and societies.​ We invest in researchers and projects across the UK and overseas, ​engage the public with fresh thinking and deb ...
 
Wild Thing is a podcast about the strange and unusual things that capture our imaginations. It’s about the relationship between science and society. It’s about wild places, wild people, and wild ideas. Because whether it’s seeking out Bigfoot, in season one, or gazing skyward to look for extraterrestrial life in season two, the search for the unknown helps us better understand ourselves. Each week, host Laura Krantz takes us through the latest chapter, which builds on previous ones, so it’s ...
 
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Drawing on a decade of ethnographic research in the Indian city of Mumbai, Waiting Town: Life in Transit and Mumbai's Other World-Class Histories (Association for Asian Studies, 2020) is an unconventional little book – experimental in form – about how we come to know the worlds about which we write. The narrative follows the author’s fieldnotes dia…
 
In this podcast, Professor Burlingame recommends a classic work of physical anthropology -- Stephen Molnar's Human Variation: Races, Types and Ethnic Groups. This book highlights how biology does, (and does not), influence our species. It's a must for those who are interested in unique ways to gain more personal growth and self-discovery. Listen to…
 
In this episode of the Anthropology in Business podcast, Steven Garcia speaks with Matt Artz about his career as a business anthropologist. The conversation covers Steven's work at the intersection of luxury brands, affluence, and culture for Team One, where he built a new anthropology practice. About Steven Garcia Steven Garcia is a cultural anthr…
 
We are excited to have Tiffany hosting the episode today and sharing her experience of conducting ethnography outside of academia in the Asian context together with Nicholas and Oshin. As a colonial discipline in its origins, anthropology inevitably carries the Western gaze, something of which to be cautious in the day-to-day research. Is there a n…
 
In this episode, David Gornoski is joined by Jeffrey Tucker, Editorial Director of the American Institute for Economic Research. David and Jeffrey touch on a variety of important topics such as the growing censorship of information, the politicization of science, the lockdowns, the return of the middle ages, the scapegoating of Trump, and more. Is …
 
David Gornoski starts the episode by pointing out how society is now run by a deep religious faith in government bureaucrats as opposed to actual science. Has Facebook become apologists for the KKK? Listen to the full episode to find out. Plus, David's THINGS HIDDEN co-host Shannon Braswell calls in to talk about Seattle angst, the Bright News proj…
 
Thanks so much to Barbara Carby for joining us this week! Barbara is Director of Disaster Risk Reduction Centre at the University of the West Indies, Mona Campus and the former Director General of the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management in Jamaica. We discuss DRR mainstreaming in the Caribbean and how states support each other …
 
/ / Welcome to the Human Being Human Podcast \ \ This is Part 1 of the fourth episode in a series of conversations between myself and my fellow Nebraskans and Human Beings. In this episode, I had quite the conversation with my close friend Jimmy Weber, who is a musician, content creator, and artist. We talked about a host of topics; growing up in s…
 
Jen noodles on the subject of accomplishments one year after bringing her business online, and Pete reveals a process for reflecting on past achievements. Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about: How are individual and collaborative accomplishments different, and similar? What might accomplishments for? What new Pete-inspired reflecti…
 
Who would have thought it, the Hollywood A-lister and founder of the luxury lifestyle brand 'Goop', Gwyneth Paltrow also finds time to host a podcast. Making her a prime target for Matt and Chris, who simply cannot stomach the competition! Fans have the option to join Paltrow in questing for the eternal and well-guarded secrets of health and wellne…
 
It’s been 60 years, to the day, since Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin was the first human to travel to space in a tiny capsule attached to an R-7 ballistic missile, a powerful rocket originally designed to carry a 3-5 megaton nuclear warhead. In this new episode marking the 60th anniversary of this historic space flight—the first of its kind—Scienti…
 
Why is nobody talking about the elephant in the room, which is nutritional science, when discussing measures against COVID? Join David Gornoski as he highlights the invasive measures taken by the state and their crony corporate allies under the pretext of stopping COVID. Is there a realistic and skin-in-the-game way of dealing with disease? Why is …
 
"So much of the information that we receive is based on lies... and it results in more violence." Join David Gornoski as he comments on the relationship between violence and lies, especially on the socio-political scale. Why is the state-submitted media becoming more and more desperate each day? Listen to the full episode to find out and also to he…
 
Hank Azaria (The Simpsons, Brockmire, The Birdcage) is an Emmy-award winning actor and comedian. Hank joins the Armchair Expert to discuss his addiction and recovery, being mistaken as someone in the upholstery business, and the controversy around his Simpson’s character. Hank and Dax discuss getting in touch with your emotions to help with conflic…
 
David Gornoski highlights how the government's phony nutritional science has contributed to the nationwide decline in both physical and mental health. The host of A Neighbor's Choice also comments on the news such as Pfizer requesting FDA clearance for vaccinating kids; YouTube's censoring of Ron DeSantis; mental health crisis in journalism; propos…
 
David Gornoski returns with A Neighbor's Choice and catches up with some of the latest news stories such as the passing of Britain's Prince Philip and the rapper DMX; Biden's preparation for gun control; the linoleic acid connection to comorbidities; YouTube's censoring of Ron DeSantis; and more. Should we be perplexed by the presence of death in o…
 
Here is our next installment of a new pop-up podcast miniseries that takes your ears into the deep sound of nature. Host Jacob Job , an ecologist and audiophile, brings you inches away from a multitude of creatures, great and small, amid the sonic grandeur of nature. You may not be easily able to access these places amid the pandemic, but after you…
 
BOOK GIVEAWAY!! Leave a Review of This Anthro Life for a chance to win a copy of Ghost Work! Leave us a written review on Apple Podcasts or Podchaser by May 8, 2021, and email us a screenshot (so we know it's you) at thisanthrolife@gmail.com. We'll randomly pick four winners out of the group from anyone who submits a review by May 8th, 2021. Now ju…
 
How can Sociology be nudged away from its traditional parochialism to embrace empirical work that focuses on the global south? Marco Garrido (assistant professor of sociology at the University of Chicago) and Victoria Reyes (assistant professor of sociology at the University of California, Riverside) are the editors of a recent special issue of Con…
 
The choices that churches make about their musical style do more than simply change the sounds one hears in their gatherings, but actually form certain kinds of community. So Monique M. Ingalls, Associate Professor of Music at Baylor University, argues in her book Singing the Congregation: How Contemporary Worship Music Forms Evangelical Community …
 
Daniel Goleman, PhD is a two-time Pulitzer Prize-nominated author and science journalist. Daniel joins the Armchair Expert to discuss the differences between cognitive empathy, emotional empathy, and empathic concern, and that emotional intelligence starts with being aware and able to name your feelings. Daniel explains the importance of cognitive …
 
In this very special episode of New Books in Interpretive Political and Social Science we feature Lee Ann Fujii’s Interviewing in Social Science Research: A Relational Approach (Routledge, 2018), which is the fifth title in the Routledge Series on Interpretive Methods. Lee Ann Fujji was a professor at the University of Toronto who published widely …
 
Duane Jethro’s Heritage Formation and the Senses in Post-Apartheid South Africa: Aesthetics of Power (Bloomsbury, 2020) is a terrific book. In it, Jethro develops a novel analytical framework to understand the relationship between the senses (taste, smell, sight, hearing and touch) and heritage formation. Heritage formation and the senses are intim…
 
Grizzlies. Pandas. Black bears. Chonkers. The episode you’ve begged for with scientist, explorer, and Ursinologist Chris Morgan. Why are bear ears so cute? What’s up with hibernation? How do you play nice with bears? What is it like to hug them? How creepy is Teddy Ruxpin? Panda patterns, fat bear competitions, tooth nubbins, land “bridges,” campin…
 
In Cartographies of Youth Resistance: Hip-Hop, Punk, and Urban Autonomy in Mexico (U California Press, 2020), based on a decade of ethnographic fieldwork, Maurice Magaña considers how urban and migrant youth in Oaxaca embrace subcultures from hip-hop to punk and adopt creative organizing practices to create meaningful channels of participation in l…
 
The conventional approach to suicide is psychiatric: ask the average person why people kill themselves, and they will likely cite depression. But this approach fails to recognize suicide’s social causes. People kill themselves because of breakups and divorces, because of lost jobs and ruined finances, because of public humiliations and the threat o…
 
Pete and Jen thrash about how they do things, and how those "how's" contribute to their overall happiness and purpose. Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about: Why is it important to think about how we are achieving our why? Why might building a team be beneficial to how you develop and create work? How might specifically crafting you…
 
In this fireside chat, Dr. Jane Goodall is joined by John Scanlon, who is CEO of Elephant Protection Initiative Foundation and chair of the Global Initiative to End Wildlife Crime, of which the Jane Goodall Institute Global is a champion. Recently John served as Special Envoy for African Parks and was the Secretary General of the Convention on Inte…
 
Paul Radin was one of the founding generation of American cultural anthropologists: A student of Franz Boas, and famed ethnographer of the Winnebago. Yet little is known about Radin's life. A leftist who was persecuted by the FBI and who lived for several years outside of the United States, and a bohemian who couldn't keep an academic job, there ar…
 
This week we welcome Belen Desmaison, a lecturer and researcher at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú (PUCP). She is coordinator of the action-research project CASA (Ciudades Auto-Sostenibles Amazónicas) and researches resettlement processes, sustainable and resilient urban and architectural design, and the generation of socially and envi…
 
What is the history of caste in a city? Indian modernizers assumed that the various processes of modernity, including industrial capitalism, would attenuate caste and create the possibility of new social relationships, including class solidarity. Instead, capitalism relied on caste to recruit and discipline labor, and the colonial and postcolonial …
 
The Value of Science in Space Exploration (Oxford UP, 2020) provides a rigorous assessment of the value of scientific knowledge and understanding in the context of contemporary space exploration. It argues that traditional spaceflight rationales are deficient, and that the strongest defense of spaceflight comes from its potential to produce intrins…
 
Lamorne Morris (New Girl, Woke, Unwanted) is an actor, comedian and podcaster. Lamorne joins the Armchair Expert to discuss growing up on the southside of Chicago, how he knew he wanted to get into comedy at a young age and his relationship with his father. Lamorne and Dax discuss systemic racism, the time he got handcuffed after trying to stop a f…
 
In 1518, the city of Strasbourg was consumed by a strange epidemic: hundreds were struck by the irresistible urge to dance until they died. This incident of Dancing Mania was not the first, and no one knew the cause of such strange behaviour. In this episode, we discuss several incidents of dancing mania, as well as the theories - past and present …
 
In which we continue to Dumbest things in history series by looking at some of the glitches in us that make them possible. And also that they are not the result of our lizard brain, because we don't have one. In this episode, we cover conspiracy thinking and theories and the apophenia that makes them possible, including pareidolia, the gambler's fa…
 
Before we dive into today’s episode we’d just like to add a content warning for this episode for sexual assault. This week, Familiar Stranger Carolyn sits down with Camille Waring from the University of Westminster. Camille is currently doing her PhD on online representations of sex workers and how photography is being used against marginalized com…
 
David Gornoski is joined by Florida Rep. Anthony Sabatini who comments on Ron DeSantis' banning of vaccine passports in Florida. Also, nutritional researcher Tucker Goodrich calls in to talk about the disastrous effects of seed oil consumption. Will DeSantis' executive order be respected by the federal government? How is the growth of vegetable and…
 
David Gornoski begins the episode by emphasizing how we do not need to conform to binary thinking and utilize coercion to solve problems. What did Jesus accomplish on the cross on Good Friday in an anthropological sense? Listen to the episode to find out, plus Etan Walls, author of The Mega Factory of Healthcare, calls in to talk about how we can b…
 
Sam Harris is a public intellectual who inspires strong reactions both positive and negative. Here, Matt and Chris dip their toes into Sam's introspective universe by analysing a recent 9 minute mini-episode of his Making Sense podcast titled 'Some Points of Confusion'. Sam intended to clear up some recurrent misunderstandings he has observed with …
 
Here is our next installment of a new pop-up podcast miniseries that takes your ears into the deep sound of nature. Host Jacob Job , an ecologist and audiophile, brings you inches away from a multitude of creatures, great and small, amid the sonic grandeur of nature. You may not be easily able to access these places amid the pandemic, but after you…
 
Ambient Sufism: Ritual Niches and the Social Work of Musical Form (University of Chicago Press, 2021) by Richard C. Jankowsky (an Associate Professor of music at Tufts University) is a rich ethnographic study of the sonic and ritual landscapes of complex religious communities in Tunisia. Using theoretical approaches of ethnomusicology that attends …
 
Are humans defining technology, or is technology defining humans? In The Coevolution: The Entwined Futures of Humans and Machines (MIT Press, 2020), Edward Ashford Lee considers the case that we are less in control of the trajectory of technology than we think. It shapes us as much as we shape it, and it may be more defensible to think of technolog…
 
Reimagining Indian Ocean Worlds (Routledge, 2020), coedited by Smriti Srinivas, Bettina Ng'weno, and Neelima Jeychandran, breaks new ground by bringing together multidisciplinary approaches to examine contemporary Indian Ocean worlds. It reconfigures the Indian Ocean as a space for conceptual and theoretical relationality based on social science an…
 
The Mises Institute's Jeff Deist calls in to talk about the recent developments surrounding the introduction of health passports. How unprecedented is this introduction and would it be favorably accepted in a pure marketplace? Is total safety preferable to freedom? Why are the young in our society so fearful of this pandemic? Why is there so much h…
 
Dr. Weiping Yu returns with more Science and U. The renowned physicist comments on the latest science news such as Japanese scientists discovering a way to regrow teeth; the promise to create a diamond nuclear-powered battery that will last for 28,000 years; physicists discovering a new phase in Bose-Einstein condensate of light particles; and more…
 
Should we trust a government that has failed miserably in the so-called war against drugs? "Our society's tyrants depend on creating mental prisons for the rest of the population to feel powerless as victims," David Gornoski says. How can we move past the consecrated chaos of democracy and towards bringing more skin in the game? Should we respond t…
 
How to learn, unlearn & stay curious at work, with Chip Conley In this episode, Damon Klotz and Chip Conley explore what it means to be a modern elder, ponder the notion of our identity being wrapped up in our work, and why the older generation's emotional intelligence is just as important as the younger generation's digital intelligence. Rebel hos…
 
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