show episodes
 
Sticky Notes is a classical music podcast for everyone, whether you are just getting interested in classical music for the first time, or if you've been listening to it and loving it all your life. Interviews with great artists, in depth looks at pieces in the repertoire, and both basic and deep dives into every era of music. Classical music is absolutely for everyone, so let's start listening! Note - Seasons 1-5 will be returning over the next year. They have been taken down in order to be ...
 
Do you dream of someday getting to perform at Carnegie Hall, or wonder what it takes to be a professional musician? The Cello Sherpa Podcast is for anyone who enjoys the tales and scales in the life of a classical musician, or for the young classical musician who dreams big! We explore all aspects of the climb to the summit from student to the professional stage! Joel Dallow, the Cello Sherpa, interviews experts in the field covering a wide range of topics surrounding this challenging career ...
 
Pathways is dedicated to telling the stories of some of our heroes for the french horn. From starting on the instrument, all the way up to the highest levels of our field, we all have one very important thing in common, and that's we all play the horn. What else do we have in common? Listen to find out!
 
Kevin Timothy Austin (b. 1988) is an avid composer with experience in a wide variety of modern compositional processes, favoring blends of genera such as spectralism, minimalism, serialism, aleatory, indeterminacy, jazz, indian classical music and electronic music, with a hint of neoclassicism and indie pop. He enjoys exploring and creating new notation methods and musical forms and maintains a tactile and organic approach to music composition. His music has received world premieres by vario ...
 
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show series
 
The Cello Sherpa Podcast Host, Joel Dallow, interviews Avi Friedlander, Cellist and Director of the Barston Suzuki Center at the Music Institute of Chicago. He shares his experience in becoming certified to teach Suzuki, starting his own school, and transitioning to his current position. Avi also talks about composing his own arrangements of popula…
 
Wagner is probably the most admired AND the most reviled composer in Western Classical Music history. I've always been uncomfortable with Wagner's music, so I decided to sit down with the wonderful conductor(and my brother-in-law), Rafael Payare to try and understand how to embrace Wagner. We talk about emotional manipulation, the length of his ope…
 
Elgar told us all about how the inspiration for his first great success: “I began to play, and suddenly my wife interrupted by saying: “Edward, that’s a good tune!... ‘What is that?’ I answered, ‘Nothing – but something might be made of it." This little improvisation turned into one of Elgar’s greatest pieces, a piece that made him a legend. This w…
 
The Cello Sherpa Podcast Host, Joel Dallow, interviews George Marriner Maull, Artistic Director of The Discovery Orchestra. Maestro Maull shares his experience in the process of building an orchestra whose mission it is to teach listening skills that help people really connect with classical music along with his advice for younger musicians. For mo…
 
On this episode, I am pleased to have bassoonist, Judith Farmer on the show. We had an interesting chat about interesting topics such as her teaching philosophy, how she stayed productive during the pandemic, what working in film recording and session work is like, what are the differences between American and European bassoon playing styles and mo…
 
Almost everyone classical music fan has a memory of the first time they saw Fantasia. The brilliant combination of music and visuals made lifelong classical music fans out of millions of people. There's no audio only version of Fantasia, so this week I chose 7 brand new pieces that are a perfect entry point into classical music. These pieces repres…
 
It's 1905 and you've just come to the premiere of Debussy's La Mer. The orchestra begins playing, and a magical and completely unique journey begins. Gone are the peaceful and placid portrayals of water in music of the past. Instead, you hear strange harmonies and a diffuse language that seems to revel in ambiguity. In fact, it sounds more like an …
 
The Cello Sherpa Podcast Host, Joel Dallow, interviews Julia Bruskin, cellist in the MET Opera Orchestra, founding member of the Claremont trio, and Co-Artistic Director of the Skaneateles Festival. She shares her experience of incredibly early professional success with the Claremont trio, and her journey to landing a position in the MET cello sect…
 
Mozart’s Jupiter Symphony is a piece that can practically define the classical era symphony. Mozart pulls out every trick in the compositional book and practically sums up everything written before him. It is a symphony full of musical cliches, self-references, and in some cases, flat out thefts from other composers. But as always with Mozart, the …
 
Schumann’s life was marked with severe mental health issues. In 1844, Schumann suffered one of his worst breakdowns yet. He was dizzy, weak, had vision problems, couldn’t sleep, and couldn't listen to music. By 1845 Schumann slowly began to recover and the first wholly new work he produced was a symphony in C Major. As Schumann said, “I began to fe…
 
Brahms spent much of his life battling with his ambition to write great symphonies and his terror at the spectre of Beethoven looming over him. His first symphony was a success, and with immense relief, Brahms quickly turned out a second symphony in just 4 months, a bit less than the 14 tortured years it took him to craft the first. At first glance…
 
The Cello Sherpa Podcast Host, Joel Dallow, interviews Amy Pollard, Professor of Bassoon at the University of Georgia Hugh Hodgson School of Music. She shares details about the bassoon and the art of reed making, along with strategies for coping with and conquering performance anxiety. If you are interested in checking out the latest Classical Clas…
 
The 1950s featured a musical battle, pitting composers like Boulez, Carter, and Babbit against Bernstein, Copland, and Messaien. But how did the Post World War II movement towards total serialism and the avant-garde came about? And how did even the most forward thinking of artists become caught between the two camps of the tonalists and the seriali…
 
The Cello Sherpa Podcast Host, Joel Dallow, interviews Saeunn Thorsteinsdottir, Associate Professor of Cello and Chamber Music at the University of Washington in Seattle. She shares the story of her journey to this faculty position, her teaching philosophy and her secrets to staying motivated. For more information, visit Saeunn's website www.saeunn…
 
This week we're talking all about atonal music! I'm going to tell you all about the history of this controversial development in classical music, its development, and perhaps most importantly, I’ll try to find a way to help you enjoy this music in all of its complexity, intensity, and yes, beauty. Part 1 is focused on 12 tone music and the beginnin…
 
From the end of WWI until 1933, classical music in Germany, Austria, and Eastern Europe was flourishing, with composers such as Zemlinsky, Weill, Krenek, Korngold, Schreker, Schulhoff, Haas, Krasa, and Ullmann writing spectacularly innovative and thrilling music. The Nazis exiled or murdered many of these musicians while in power, but their music l…
 
The Cello Sherpa Podcast Host, Joel Dallow, interviews Eric Kim, Professor of Cello at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music. He offers advice on how to prepare for orchestra auditions and shares his wealth of experience as principal cellist of the Cincinnati Symphony, the San Diego Symphony, and the Denver Symphony. If you are looking for …
 
In 1901, in the throes of the Finnish Independence movement, Jean Sibelius composed his legendary 2nd Symphony. Sibelius’ close colleague, the conductor Robert Kajanus, said that the symphony "strikes one as the most broken-hearted protest against all the injustice that threatens at the present time to deprive the sun of its light and our flowers o…
 
Within three months of his arrival in New York, Antonin Dvorak was enamored with the sound of American music. Quickly he put forth what was at the time a controversial idea: "In the Negro melodies of America I discover all that is needed for a great and noble school of music..." This inspiration is threaded through almost every note of the New Worl…
 
The Cello Sherpa Podcast Host, Joel Dallow, interviews Joseph Young, Peabody Conservatory's Artistic Director of Ensembles. He shares his experience from band to the baton, and offers advice for incoming students on preparing for a myriad of ensembles offered through this exceptional program. If you are looking for in person/virtual cello lessons, …
 
Havergal Brian’s ambitious Gothic Symphony has been called many things - massive, ambitious, barbaric, incompetent, insane, moving, brilliant, awful, torture, and much more. It is almost never performed due to the forces it requires and its two hour duration. Today on the show I’ll tell you about the background to this monumental work, and then I’l…
 
With the rise of Wagner, the symphony seemed to be left for dead. But one composer in particular, Anton Bruckner, decided to take the plunge back into the symphonic genre, though he did it with a markedly Wagnerian touch. His most popular symphony? The 7th. We’ll talk about the connection between Wagner and Bruckner throughout the show, but we’ll a…
 
The Cello Sherpa Podcast Host, Joel Dallow, interviews Christina Smith about her experience being appointed as Principal Flutist of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra at only 20 years old! She shares her journey, and offers fantastic advice on how to continuously aim to be at your best in such a high profile position. If you are looking for in person/v…
 
Gabriela Lena Frank is currently serving as Composer-in-Residence with the storied Philadelphia Orchestra and was included in the Washington Post's list of the 35 most significant women composers in history, I've always been a huge fan of Lena Frank's music, and I was so thrilled to talk with her about how she approaches writing, the sense of fanta…
 
In 1961, a poem appeared by the young poet Yevgeny Yevtushenko, entitled Babi Yar. The first line of this poem is: “There are no monuments over Babi Yar.” In September of 1941 at least 33,771 Jews were murdered at the Babi Yar ravine in Ukraine; the largest single massacre of Jews to that point in WWII. Shostakovich, moved by the bravery of Yevtush…
 
Martin Kuuskmann is a multiple Grammy-nominated Estonian-born bassoon virtuoso, Moosmann artist, and the Professor of Bassoon and Chamber Music at the University of Denver. A graduate of the Manhattan School of Music and the Yale School of Music, his mentors include Stephen Maxym, Frank Morelli, Rufus Olivier and Ilmar Aasmets.On this episode, we t…
 
The Cello Sherpa Podcast Host, Joel Dallow, interviews Evans Mirageas for a behind the scenes look at how the sausage is made. If you are looking for in person/virtual cello lessons, or orchestral repertoire audition coachings, check out www.theCelloSherpa.com Follow us on twitter @theCello SherpaBy Joel Dallow
 
Never heard of Tom Wiggins? You're in for a treat with this episode! Tom Wiggins was a fantastic 19th century pianist and composer who was ruthlessly exploited by his owner/guardian on account of his race and his mental condition. He was known as one of the greatest performers of his era and yet was never paid for his work. I sat down with Deirdre …
 
The Bach Chaconne is one of the great masterpieces of Western Classical Music, and today we're going to be diving straight into this monumental work. We'll talk about the legends behind its composition, the work itself, different interpretations of the piece, and its many many arrangements. As Brahms wrote about the piece: “On one stave, for a smal…
 
The Cello Sherpa Podcast Host, Joel Dallow, interviews Noah Bendix-Balgley about his journey from participating in major international competitions, to First Concertmaster of one of the top orchestras in the world: the Berlin Philharmonic. If you are looking for in person/virtual cello lessons, or orchestral repertoire audition coachings, check out…
 
I had the chance to sit down with virtually with the legendary Wynton Marsalis for a conversation about Jazz, comparing jazz and classical pieces, why so many classical composers writing jazz fail and vice versa, and about his massively ambitious Blues Symphony. About halfway through the show Wynton takes you straight through the first movement of …
 
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