show episodes
 
The transition 11,700 years ago from the Pleistocene glacial period into the Holocene interglacial witnessed the expansion of humans around the world, climatic warming and the demise of many large vertebrate species. Since that time extinctions have continued on land and in the sea, culminating with the biodiversity crisis we are experiencing today. We explored these prehistoric extinctions—Who? When? Where? and Why?—in order to learn more about our planet’s future. Students then translated ...
 
Exploring Arizona Life Science Research and Biodiversity with the Tree of Life Web Project. The series focuses on Sonoran Desert biodiversity and research at the University of Arizona. The Bugs of the Month sub-series features entomologist Carl Olson. The work of the general community, teachers and learners is also showcased, and we welcome contributors from all walks of life, as well as features that highlight the connections between cultural and biological diversity.
 
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show series
 
Hi everyone, my name is Isabel Cardenas and I’ll be talking about the market for bear bile and what it means to farmed bears, wild bears, and North American bears. In parts of Asia, drinking bear bile is a traditional remedy to cure intestinal and heart illnesses1. This has created an enormous market for fresh bear bile. Poachers have decimated the…
 
It seems so innocent. Pretty houses with manicured lawns, several little parks with small grassy fields bordered by metal fences, a few house sparrows hopping around the picnic tables. We’d call it a beautiful town. Unfortunately, this perception of beauty is deadly (Rosenzweig). Hi. My name is Yari and I’m here to provide some urban makeover tips …
 
On an island called Isla Juan Fernandez in the Pacific Ocean there lives a hummingbird that I’ll tell you a bit about today called the Juan Fernandez Firecrown. It is a strikingly beautiful little thing, and it lives only on this one island (Hodum). Today it is threatened for a whole host of reasons, all caused in some way by humans, and exacerbate…
 
Hi I’m Lauren and your listening to “Where did the Dingo Go?”We often think of Australia as a land hopping with kangaroos, wallabies, bilbies and other fuzzy critters. What most people don’t realize is that, despite this apparent diversity, in the last 2 centuries Australia has seen 19 of its unique mammal species become extinct (Johnson 2006) –tha…
 
Why has the Pacific Island of Guam gone from sounding…like this...to a little more like this...Hello again everyone!My name is Joseph, and today I’m reporting to you all from the always beautiful Stanford University. Before we dive in, first a little about me. You see, I was born on the island of Guam 18 years ago. The silence you got a brief glimp…
 
Hello again. Like I said before, I’m Mark Valentine and I’m going to be talking about Megafaunal Extinction and how it affects present and future biodiversity. Before I begin, you probably are going to want to know what exactly Megafauna are. Megafauna are HUGE animals. This would certainly include animals like elephants and giraffes, but also lion…
 
Me: In the last episode, we talked about efforts to save charismatic animals from extinction. In this episode, we ask a very different question: is it ever ok to MAKE an animal go extinct?Not me: Of course not. It's immoral to just wipe a living creature off the face of the earth.Me: Well, let me tell you about an animal I - and the U.N. - think sh…
 
Me: Some call it cuteness, some call it charisma, some even call it animal magnetism: Hi, I’m Jack Werner, and today I’ll be talking about why we try so much harder to conserve likeable species and what this means for endangered animals everywhere.With me is my good friend, Not me.Not me:Hello thereMe:Let’s get to it. From China’s giant pandas to t…
 
The Relationship Between Maize and TeosinteDylan SweetwoodYou probably already know that maize, or corn, is one of the most culturally and commercially important crops in the world, with hundreds of applications in areas from agriculture to energy. But what you may not know is that teosinte, one of corn’s closest genetic relatives, is currently und…
 
Bartholomew: Hey guys. So last week I took my family to the zoo where we watched a show about orangutans. I was a little upset to hear that they’re declining in numbers. Anyway, last night I met up with Nicole Ruiz, a Stanford student interested in orangutan conservation, and she let me in on the little things that make orangutans so special. Tune …
 
Did you hear that?That was the sound of the little brown bat - Myotis lucifugus. They’re everywhere on summer nights, and sometimes if you’re lucky, you’ll get to catch a glimpse of one as it chases mosquitoes through the trees.But go outside right now if you want to, because it’s possible that within the next sixteen years, you won’t be hearing mo…
 
Arizona has the most ant diversity in the USA, with over 300 known species. This video profiles Pogonomyremex, or "pogos" commonly found in the Sonoran Desert of the Southwestern United States. Entomologists and UA Phd Students Kim Franklin and Chris Schmidt, and ToL Learning Materials Editor and Educator Lisa Schwartz spent some time in Chris's ba…
 
Join Brad Lancaster and volunteers planting native Sonoran Desert plants to re-vegetate an urban landscape in Tucson, Arizona. Curb cutting and terraced and mulched basins are two permaculture techniques explored in this episode.By Lisa Schwartz, Tree of Life Learning Materials Editor, Outreach Coordinator and Podcast Producer
 
University of Arizona Students, UA peace corps fellows and volunteers joined Brad Lancaster, Tucson permaculture expert, for a workshop on water harvesting on the grounds of the Nature Conservancy Headquarters in Tucson, Arizona.By Lisa Schwartz, ToL Learning Materials Editor, Tree of Life Web Project, tolweb.org
 
Jeff Hartman and students in his 9th grade class at City High School in Tucson, Arizona share the fun challenges and opportunities of building and observing ecobottles. The class also helped to create this podcast!By Lisa Schwartz, ToL Learning Materials Editor, Tree of Life Web Project, tolweb.org
 
Bugs of the Month: Manduca rusticaLearn about the large and beautiful Manduca rustica, or the Rustic sphinx moth, from larva to pupa and adult. Manduca rustica is often referred to as a hawk of sphinx moth. The Manduca rustica has very large larva(caterpillars) and adults, and are important desert pollinators. Look out for them on your Desert Willo…
 
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