show episodes
 
Learning your history makes you - and your people - stronger. As Black people, we know we’re left out of the history books. That the media images are skewed. That we need access to experts, information and ideas so we can advance our people. Black History Year connects you to the history, thinkers, and activists that are left out of the mainstream conversations. You may not agree with everything you hear, but we’re always working toward one goal: uniting for the best interest of Black people ...
 
New episodes come out every Tuesday for free, with 1-week early access for Wondery+ subscribers. Every scandal begins with a lie. But the truth will come out. And then comes the fallout and the outrage. Scandals have shaped America since its founding. From business and politics to sports and society, we look on aghast as corruption, deceit and ambition bring down heroes and celebrities, politicians and moguls. And when the dust finally settles, we’re left to wonder: how did this happen? Wher ...
 
News, politics, history, culture, and more from Jacobin. Featuring: The Dig, Long Reads, Behind the News, Jacobin Radio, Weekends, The Jacobin Show, Vast Majority, Michael and Us, A World to Win, and special series. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
From alleyway gangsters to cold war spies to eccentric entrepreneurs, Australian history is full of colourful but forgotten characters. Host Jen Kelly talks with experts, historians and yarn spinners to uncover the untold stories of some of our most interesting and offbeat ancestors. Produced by Jonty Burton and Andrea Thiis-Evensen.
 
Epic stories of Black people who fought for their liberty and transformed America after the Civil War. Using first-hand accounts from diaries, newspapers, speeches, and letters, this is a narrated docu-drama about the failures and successes of the Reconstruction era, told by those who made it happen.
 
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We Are History

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We Are History

Angela Barnes and John O'Farrell

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The less-than-serious history podcast with stand up comedian Angela Barnes (The News Quiz, Mock The Week and Live at The Apollo) and writer John O'Farrell (An Utterly Impartial History of Britain, Things Can Only Get Better, Spitting Image). In each podcast our two history nerds discuss, explain and laugh at interesting and quirky episodes from the olden days, such as East German Nudism, Spy Pigeons or Vlad the Impaler. Angela and John’s in-depth knowledge of world history has been described ...
 
What we don’t know about American history hurts us all. Teaching Hard History begins with the long legacy of slavery and reaches through Reconstruction, Jim Crow, and the civil rights movement into the present day. Brought to you by Learning for Justice (formerly Teaching Tolerance) and hosted by Dr. Hasan Kwame Jeffries and Dr. Bethany Jay, Teaching Hard History brings us the lessons we should have learned in school through the voices of scholars and educators. It’s great advice for teacher ...
 
The 1950s & 60s saw a wave of radical movements. Che Guevara and the Cuban Revolution. The Black Panthers. Quebec and Canada had the FLQ — a showdown that dissolved into crisis. By October 1970, there were soldiers in the streets, communities on edge, kidnapping and terror in the headlines. But those frightening weeks were just the crescendo of a wave of terror and violence that was nearly a decade in the making. This series will reveal the stories of that time through immersive storytelling ...
 
Twisted History is a petulant and irreverent look at the darker side of history hosted by two guys (Large and Vibbs) who had to look up the words “petulant” and “irreverent”. It’s been called a "delightful romp through the annals of murder and mayhem” by Large’s wife, and the series aims to entertain by shedding light onto some of the weirder skeletons that reside within the closets of History, Sports, Music, Politics, and Celebrity. Presented by Barstool Sports.
 
Welcome to Everyday Black History! Where we highlight the contributions of Black Men and Women both Past and present. Here we celebrate Afro Appreciation, where Black American, Africans and Latinos of African descent are honored. We also highlight Institutions that have help the advancement of people in the African Diaspora, such as historically Black University and many others. Enjoy Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/EverydayBlackHistory/support
 
The Historical Blindness podcast is a podcast about history’s myths, mysteries, and forgotten truths. By examining cases of outrageous hoaxes, pernicious conspiracy theory, mass delusion, baffling mysteries and unreliable historiography, Historical Blindness searches for insights into modern religious belief and political culture.
 
GirlTrek's epic 21-day walking meditation series to remember where we came from and to gather strength for the road ahead. We celebrate Black stories and the lessons of our ancestors to help guide us through these uncertain times. Each episode, is a conversation on learning, living and elevating to our highest self with guidance from lessons of the past. Hosted by GirlTrek Co-founders Morgan Dixon and Vanessa Garrison. Produced by: Ebony Andrews
 
Please note that because iTunes limits the number of episodes displayed to 300, to start at the beginning of my retelling of the story of England, you need to SUBSCRIBE. You'll then find a regular, chronological podcast, starting from from the end of Roman Britain. I’m a bloke in a shed, but I make sure this is good, properly prepared history, and then fill it with my enthusiasm. You’ll find the great events and people for sure – but also some of the byways, of how people lived, their langua ...
 
The tides of American history lead through the streets of New York City — from the huddled masses on Ellis Island to the sleazy theaters of 1970s Times Square. The elevated railroad to the Underground Railroad. Hamilton to Hammerstein! Greg and Tom explore more than 400 years of action-packed stories, featuring both classic and forgotten figures who have shaped the world.
 
If you love history, this is the podcast for you! Stories of forgotten history, presented by Josh Geiger with Lance Geiger, The History Guy, from the hit YouTube channel The History Guy: History Deserves to be Remembered. Visit the channel here: www.youtube.com/TheHistoryGuyChannel We believe that history does not have to be boring. At its heart, history is storytelling, and we believe that it should be told with passion and genuine love for the material. History might be tragic, it might be ...
 
A podcast about the Golden Age of Piracy in the Caribbean, the real men and women that threatened the trade and stability of the Old World empires, the forces that led them to piracy and the myths and stories they inspired. Famous names like Captain Henry Morgan, Henry Avery, Charles Vane, Mary Reed, Anne Bonny, Black Bart Roberts, Ned Low, and Edward 'Blackbeard' Teach will rub elbows with Queens, Kings, Popes, rebellious monks, Caribbean Natives, African Slaves and notorious governors like ...
 
Live constitutional conversations and debates featuring leading historians, journalists, scholars, and public officials hosted at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia and across America. To watch National Constitution Center Town Halls live, check out our schedule of upcoming programs at constitutioncenter.org/townhall. Register through Zoom to ask your constitutional questions in the Q&A or watch live on YouTube at YouTube.com/ConstitutionCenter.
 
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show series
 
Jason Cyrus and Anne-Marie Guérin join us in a discussion about the complex histories quite literally woven into the cotton garments we wear, the subject of the new exhibition History is Rarely Black or White at Ontario's Agnes Etherington Art Centre's exhibition. For more on the exhibit: https://agnes.queensu.ca/exhibition/history-is-rarely-black-…
 
Education has always mattered to Black people. Our enslaved ancestors risked their lives to learn what white oppressors withheld. Because those oppressors understood the important role knowledge of ones history, one's world, and oneself plays in Black liberation. Hundreds of years have gone by, and throughout them all, white supremacy has continued…
 
In 1960s mainstream schooling in Britain was failing many black immigrant children. A disproportionate number were being sent to schools for those with low intelligence. Black educationalists like Gus John and others set up supplementary Saturday schools for black children to try to mitigate the problem. Claire Bowes has been hearing how some polic…
 
We are joined by Damien Jöel, an interdisciplinary artist and fashion storyteller whose fashion story "Songs of the Gullahis" is at the heart of the new exhibition History is Rarely Black or White on view at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre in Ontario, Canada. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
Subscribe to the podcast! https://podfollow.com/everythingeverywhere/ The term “banana republic” is often used pejoratively to describe small, poor, unstable developing countries. Being called a banana republic is never a good thing. However, that term has a very real origin which involved actual bananas, mercenaries, corporate money, and the Ameri…
 
This week, The Experiment takes a look at the charge that sent Anissa Jordan to prison for a crime she didn’t even know had been committed. We consider how the felony-murder rule disproportionately punishes youth of color and women, and the debate over whether the same rule is key to holding police officers responsible in the killings of civilians.…
 
ND stages a trialogue this week with MacArthur "Genius" Cristina Rivera Garza and Notre Dame critics Kate Marshall and Dominique Vargas. Professor Rivera Garza recalls roadtripping through Mexico in a bochito (a Volkswagen). For her, such drives became the mother of literary invention: there was no car radio and when family conversations died down,…
 
At the end of the 1990s, hundreds of thousands of people in South Africa were still dying from HIV/AIDS because effective drug treatments were prohibitively expensive for a developing country. Under pressure from AIDS activists, the government of Nelson Mandela took the big international pharmaceutical companies to court over the right to import ch…
 
The Enlightenment is often either praised as the wellspring of modern egalitarianism or condemned as the cradle of scientific racism. How should we make sense of this paradox? The Color of Equality: Race and Common Humanity in Enlightenment Thought (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021) is the first book to investigate both the inclusive language of common h…
 
The Arab Spring erupted eleven years ago when a wave of "pro-democracy" protests spread throughout the Middle East and North Africa. The effects of the uprisings reverberated around the world as regimes fell in some countries, and civil war began in others. This week, we remember the years leading up to the Arab Spring, and its lasting impact on th…
 
In this interview, I speak with Till F. Paasche and James D. Sidaway about their new book, Transecting Securityscapes: Dispatches from Cambodia, Iraq, and Mozambique (University of Georgia Press, 2021). In addition to the book's methodological and theoretical contributions, we also discussed the extensive field research and important personal exper…
 
Jacobin and Catalyst contributor Chris Maisano joins The Jacobin Show for a discussion about democracy in the U.S. Then, in a special, double "Labor Paul" segment, Paul Trujillo weighs in on the latest from the Teamsters Union. The Jacobin Show offers socialist perspectives on class and capitalism in the twenty-first century, the failures of libera…
 
The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree has brought joy and sparkle to Midtown Manhattan since the early 1930s. The annual festivities may seem steady and timeless but this holiday icon actually has a surprisingly dramatic history. Millions tune in each year to watch the tree lighting in a music-filled ceremony on NBC, and tens of thousands more will…
 
In the first episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Chris Harding speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about Japan in the years running up to December 1941. They discuss the long-running historical factors that edged the country ever closer to war with the United States, and ask: what led Japan to embark on such a risky gamble? See acast.com/p…
 
Subscribe to the podcast! https://podfollow.com/everythingeverywhere/ The Swedish King Gustavus Adolphus oversaw the rise of Sweden as one of the great powers in Europe. In 1626, he ordered the construction of a warship that would be the most powerful floating platform in Northern Europe. Its maiden voyage in 1628 was one of the most memorable of a…
 
Hickok becomes the marshal of Hays City after Texas cowboys scare off the previous lawmen. The small Kansas town has never seen a marshal like Wild Bill. His unique appearance and routine cause the townsfolk to marvel, but nothing will stop outlaws from challenging him in the streets and the saloons. And then, the granddaddy of the Kansas cowtowns,…
 
Following upon the success of his magisterial account of Winston Churchill, Andrew Roberts returns with an outstanding biography of George III: The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of George III (Viking, 2021) . Drawing on important new archival material, Roberts rescues George III from unwarranted criticism and dramatic hyperbole to s…
 
In 1987 the first successful drug treatment was developed for Aids. AZT went from initial test to approval in just over two years - at the time it was the fastest approval in US history. Claire Bowes talks to Dr Samuel Broder, the co-developer of AZT.Picture: Dr Samuel Broder and President Ronald Reagan. Credit: Ronald Reagan Library…
 
More than one million Indian soldiers were deployed during World War I, serving in the Indian army as part of Britain's imperial war effort. These men fought in France and Belgium, Egypt and East Africa, and at Gallipoli, in Palestine, and in Mesopotamia. While Indian contributions to the war have long been recognized (unlike other colonial contrib…
 
Kari Swenson was a world-class athlete with a promising career ahead of her as a biathlete. But in the summer of 1984, she went for a jog in the Big Sky wilderness area south of Bozeman, Montana and encountered two men with guns. They kidnapped her at gunpoint and took her deep into the woods. Rescue parties race to find her, and the pursuit result…
 
As part of their ongoing conversations about how to restore the guardrails of American democracy, the National Constitution Center and the SNF Agora Institute at Johns Hopkins University present a conversation exploring the role of the president in our constitutional system. Experts Jessica Bulman-Pozen, law professor at Columbia Law School, Saikri…
 
On today's episode the History Guy discusses the history of several naturally occurring resources: the mineral asbestos, with its reputation as a hazardous material, and Helium, one of the universe’s most abundant elements. Both have surprising and interesting histories. MagellanTV - a brand-new streaming service that features the very best collect…
 
Colour has been hugely important to humans through history, with different cultures attaching their own meanings to all the hues of the rainbow. From the ancient societies who venerated purple to the modern political radicals who chose red as the colour of revolution, James Fox speaks to Rhiannon Davies about these fascinating associations. (Ad) Ja…
 
Subscribe to the podcast! https://podfollow.com/everythingeverywhere/ The planet Neptune was discovered in 1846. Ever since then, astronomers have felt there had to be another planet beyond the orbit of Neptune. Everyone assumed they found it with the discovery of Pluto in 1930, however, something still wasn’t quite right. 90 years later, the myste…
 
Known around the world simply as Lula, Luis Inácio Lula da Silva was born in 1945 to illiterate parents who migrated to industrializing São Paulo. He learned to read at ten years of age, left school at fourteen, became a skilled metalworker, rose to union leadership, helped end a military dictatorship--and in 2003 became the thirty-fifth president …
 
Monica Lewinsky testifies against President Clinton. The Senate conducts a politically charged impeachment trial. Listen to new episodes 1 week early and to all episodes ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/americanscandal. Support us …
 
Host Nate Wilcox welcomes Black Flag biographer Stevie Chick to discuss the band's emergence from the suburbs of Los Angeles and the vicious resistance they faced every step of the way. Let It Roll is proud to be part of Pantheon Podcasts. Have a question or a suggestion for a topic or person for Nate to interview? Email letitrollpodcast@gmail.com …
 
Before there was Elon Musk, there was Tony Stark. We travelled back to 2008 to look at IRON MAN, the first entry in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and were excited to find that it serves its ideology on a big platter and with minimal ornamentation. A video on the filming of Iron Man 2 at Edwards Air Force Base - vimeo.com/191818335 Michael and Us i…
 
E515 | The 1948 War resulted in the creation of the state of Israel and the Nakba of 750,000 Palestinian refugees. In Dear Palestine, Shay Hazkani sheds new light on these events through a unique source base: hundreds of personal letters secretly copied by an Israeli censorship apparatus. We talk in this episode both about his struggle to access th…
 
Psychiatrist and historian George Makari speaks to Jon Bauckham about the origins of the term “xenophobia”, and the ways in which western thinkers have interpreted people’s fear of strangers, from the 19th century to the present day. (Ad) George Makari is the author of Of Fear and Strangers: A History of Xenophobia (Yale University Press, 2021). Bu…
 
In the Second World War, one branch of the security services was established to help British Prisoners escape from German camps and make their way back home. Inventing secret hidden gadgets, they were the inspiration for 'Q' in the James Bond stories. (This podcast comes with a hidden map and compass.) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out …
 
Subscribe to the podcast! https://podfollow.com/everythingeverywhere/ Located in Vatican City, just off St. Peter’s Square lies one of the plainest and most uninteresting buildings you might ever find. It has no adornments and it is just a solid beige color. However, inside that bland structure, you will find one of humanity’s greatest artistic ach…
 
In the early days of Aids, a misunderstanding made one man the face of the epidemic. Canadian air steward Gaetan Dugas developed the symptoms of HIV/Aids in the early 1980s, but a misreading of scientific data led to him being identified as 'patient zero', giving the mistaken impression he was responsible for the spread of the disease. Lucy Burns s…
 
How do Black women entrepreneurs in South Africa play off westerners’ fear and desire for impoverished townships through home-based tourist accommodations? This episode’s guest is Dr. Annie Hikido, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Colby College. She tells us how her racialized experiences growing up as a Japanese-American woman in California pus…
 
This week on In Black America, producer and host John L. Hanson, Jr. presents a tribute to Shirley A. Chisholm, the late Congresswoman from New York’s 12th Congressional District, the first African America woman elected to Congress, a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus, and the first major party African American candidate for Preside…
 
Christine Kinealy answers listener questions on the devastating famine that struck Ireland in the mid-19th century Christine Kinealy answers listener questions on the causes and consequences of the devastating famine that struck Ireland in the mid-19th century. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she also discusses whether we should call it a “famine”, th…
 
Subscribe to the podcast! https://podfollow.com/everythingeverywhere/ You’ve probably heard of artificial intelligence systems which have gotten so good that they can beat the best humans at Go, chess, and even Jeopardy. However, over 200 years ago one Hungarian engineer created a mechanical device that could defeat the world’s greatest chess playe…
 
Emperor Yingzong is back on his throne thanks to the conspirators loyal to him. Only they turn out to be not so much loyal to "him," as they are to the idea that they should have more and more power. It all culminates with yet another coup d'etat..真讨厌... Time Period Covered: 1457-1464 CE Major Historical Figures: Emperor Yingzong (Zhu Qizhen) [r. 1…
 
We put themed music at the end of each episode - "dessert," if you will. In the spirit of this holiday season, where we give ourselves the joy of eating dessert first, we'd like to highlight the artists whose work has enhanced ours over the past few years . See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art…
 
The three Mirabal sisters were leading figures in the Dominican Republic's opposition movement against the dictator General Rafael Trujillo. They were all killed on the 25th November 1960. We hear from the daughter of one of them, Minerva, who tells us about her family and from Professor Elizabeth Manley on the Mirabal sister's legacy in the Domini…
 
Shakespeare has been an obsession of extremist groups across the globe over the centuries. The Nazi Party held him up as a hero, while Osama Bin Laden condemned him as the ultimate symbol of the depraved west. Islam Issa speaks to Rhiannon Davies about the playwright’s tangled relationship with terror. (Ad) Islam Issa is the author of Shakespeare a…
 
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