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Best Brian K. Reese podcasts we could find (updated February 2020)
Best Brian K. Reese podcasts we could find
Updated February 2020
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Its a Star Wars-centric episode! Today on the program we will be discussing Doctor Aphra Volume one – by Kieron Gillen with art by Kev Walker. Dr. Aphra was the breakout character from the original Darth Vader run and became so popular a spinoff series was created. Doctor Aphra is an archeologist/adventurer – much like Indiana Jones, if Indiana Jon…
 
If you’re a grad student facing the ugly reality of finding a tenure-track job, you could easily be forgiven for thinking about a career change. However, if you’ve spent the last several years working on a PhD, or if you’re a faculty member whose career has basically consisted of higher ed, switching isn’t so easy. PhD holders are mostly trained to…
 
In this this interview, Dr. Carrie Tippen talks with J. L. Anderson about the 2019 book Capitalist Pigs: Pigs, Pork, and Power in America published by West Virginia University Press. Anderson provides a history of pigs in America from the first arrival on the continent in the Columbian Exchange to the modern agribusiness of pork production, describ…
 
And we’re back… And this week we are discussing King Arthur…in spaaaaaaaace! That’s right we’ll be tailing about the first maxi series Camelot 3000 from DC Comics written by Mike W. Barr and Brian Bolland. This is a highly influential comic that paved the way for things like Watchmen and Dark Knight Returns and many others. It also deals with sever…
 
The red Zagat guide to restaurants was a fixture to a generation of New York diners before Google bought the brand and stopped publishing copies of the book. In time for the 40th Anniversary, new owners The Infatuation, and Editor in Chief Hillary Reinsberg released a new version and it is selling well and attracting renewed interest in the brand. …
 
Today we are joined by Maria Veri, Associate Professor of Kinesiology at San Francisco State University, and Rita Liberti, Professor of Kinesiology at California State University, East Bay. Together they are the authors of Gridiron Gourmet: Gender and Food at the Football Tailgate (University of Arkansas Press, 2019), one of the most compelling boo…
 
Why do Americans eat so much beef? In Red Meat Republic: A Hoof-to-Table History of How Beef Changed America (Princeton University Press, 2019), the historian Joshua Specht provides a history that shows how our diets and consumer choices remain rooted in nineteenth century enterprises. A century and half ago, he writes, the colonialism and appropri…
 
In this this interview, Dr. Carrie Tippen talks with A.R. Ruis about the 2017 book Eating to Learn, Learning to Eat: The Origins of School Lunch in the United States – published in 2017 by Rutgers University Press. Ruis narrates the development of school lunch programs from the late 19th century to the present, describing the evolution from locally…
 
We’ve all heard that a picture is worth a thousand words, but what if we don’t understand what we’re looking at? Social media has made charts, infographics, and diagrams ubiquitous―and easier to share than ever. We associate charts with science and reason; the flashy visuals are both appealing and persuasive. Pie charts, maps, bar and line graphs, …
 
There are few areas of modern life that are burdened by as much information and advice, often contradictory, as our diet and health: eat a lot of meat, eat no meat; whole-grains are healthy, whole-grains are a disaster; eat everything in moderation; eat only certain foods--and on and on. In 100 Million Years of Food: What Our Ancestors Ate and Why …
 
Today on the program we discuss the 1996 Elseworlds event comic Kingdom Come. This is the classic mini-series written by Marc Waid with magnificent art by Alex Ross. It is an alternate future where old heroes have retired and new heroes are running amok. So an aging Superman needs to come back to get them off his damn lawn. This is an extremely inf…
 
Satire! Parody! 1970s weirdness at its finest! Today on the program we discuss the 1978 Judge Dredd story-arc The Cursed Earth originally published in 2000AD (the magazine not the year). Loosely based on Roger Zelazny’s novel Damnation Alley the story finds out titular anti-hero traveling across a nuclear fallout wasteland on a mission to save the …
 
As you may know, university presses publish a lot of good books. In fact, they publish thousands of them every year. They are different from most trade books in that most of them are what you might called "fundamental research." Their authors--dedicated researchers one and all--provide the scholarly stuff upon which many non-fiction trade books are…
 
Happy Halloween Everyone! Today on the program we talk horror comics from the 1970s! Specifically the Living Mummy. In the 1950s the Comic Book Code all but killed the horror comic. But in the 1970s restrictions were eased a bit allowing horror to come back to comics – Marvel was quick to capitalize on this and rushed into publication titles such a…
 
This is the 50th episode! We’ve done 50 of these bad boys. There should be fireworks and John Phillip Sousa music or something. I want to thank our listeners, those that have been with us from the start and new listeners just joining us – it is so great to have you all here and giving us feedback and encouragement. It’s always amazing to me that th…
 
With Al Zambone this week is Rachel Laudan, author of the fascinating Cuisine and Empire: Cooking in World History (University of California Press, 2015). Once a historian of science and technology, living and teaching in Hawaii made her a historian of food. In her book she describes the development and decline of cuisines throughout world history …
 
The things that make people academics -- as deep fascination with some arcane subject, often bordering on obsession, and a comfort with the solitude that developing expertise requires -- do not necessarily make us good teachers. Jessamyn Neuhaus’s Geeky Pedagogy: A Guide for Intellectuals, Introverts, and Nerds Who Want to Be Effective Teachers (We…
 
First of all sorry for the delay! This was almost a lost episode. There were some technical difficulties and we thought possibly re would need to rerecord. But with some patience, diligence and a few late nights we were able to recover the files. So I hope its worth it. On the program we will be discussing Moon Knight: From the Dead the 2014 6 issu…
 
In this this interview, Dr. Carrie Tippen talks with Rafia Zafar about her 2019 book Recipes for Respect: African American Meals and Meaning, from the University of Georgia Press. It’s part of the Southern Foodways Alliance Studies in Culture, People and Place series. The book contains 7 chapters, covering the earliest formally-published African-Am…
 
Tibetan Buddhism teaches compassion toward all beings, a category that explicitly includes animals. Slaughtering animals is morally problematic at best and, at worst, completely incompatible with a religious lifestyle. Yet historically most Tibetans—both monastic and lay—have made meat a regular part of their diet. In Food of Sinful Demons: Meat, V…
 
On the program we discuss Superman Red Son – the 2003 Elseworlds mini-series written by Mark Millar and art by Dave Johnson. This three issue series imagines a world where Superman landed in a field in the Soviet Union realer than on a farm in Kansas. It is a fascinating idea and is held up as one of the best Superman stories ever written…but does …
 
Black Food Geographies: Race, Self-Reliance, and Food Access in Washington, D.C. (University of North Carolina Press, 2019), by Ashanté M. Reese, examines the ways in which residents of the Deanwood neighborhood navigate the surrounding area to acquire food. Reese examines the historical processes that gave rise to the decrease of supermarkets, gen…
 
In this this interview, Dr. Carrie Tippen talks with Jennifer Jensen Wallach about the her book Getting What We Need Ourselves: How Food has Shaped African American Life (Rowman & Littlefield, 2019). The book covers a wide chronology and geography from the continent of Africa pre-Transatlantic slave trade to lunch counter sit-ins of the Civil Right…
 
Cities are extremely complex institutions to understand and are continually changing. A central place to make sense of the complexities of a city is the food that is grown and sold in these areas. Mark Winne, author of Food Town USA: Seven Unlikely Cities that are Changing the Way We Eat (Island Press, 2019) and my guest for this episode, observed …
 
In Corn Crusade: Khrushchev’s Farming Revolution in the Post-Stalin Soviet Union (Oxford University Press, 2018), Aaron Hale-Dorrell re-evaluates Khrushchev’s corn campaign as the cornerstone of his reformation programs. Corn was key to Khrushchev’s promises of providing everyone with the abundance required for achieving communism, which included t…
 
On the program we discuss Monstress – the fantasy comic from Image Comics written by Marjorie Liu with art Sana Takeda. It is filled with intricate world-building, complex characters and stunning art that is some of the best being produced in comics today. It is set in a world of magic and war, populated by humans, immortal beings, hybrid creatures…
 
In this this interview, Dr. Carrie Tippen talks with Carol J. Adams about two new books: Burger, from the Object Lessons series by Bloomsbury (2018), and Protest Kitchen, a cookbook with over 50 vegan recipes and practical daily actions from Conari press. Both books were published in 2018. Audiences probably know Adams best as the author of The Sex…
 
In their introduction to Seasoned Socialism: Gender & Food in Late Soviet Everyday Life (Indiana University Press, 2019), Anastasia Lakhtikova, Angela Brintlinger, and Irina Glushchenko invite the reader to “imagine a society where food is managed by officialdom like a controlled substance and everyone is addicted to it.” Food plays a pivotal role …
 
Content warning: we want to issue a warning…we use some pretty harsh language on the episode both in describing the content of the comic as well as expressing our opinion of the material. This is something we try not to do but with this comic it was…it keeping with what was being discussed. In addition we also talk about some pretty sensitive subje…
 
Academic discussions of ethnic food have tended to focus on the attitudes of consumers, rather than the creators and producers. In this ground-breaking new book, The Ethnic Restaurateur (Bloomsbury, 2016), Krishnendu Ray reverses this trend by exploring the culinary world from the perspective of the ethnic restaurateur. Focusing on New York City, h…
 
In Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life (W. W. Norton & Co., 2018), Dr. David R. Montgomery portrays hope amidst the backdrop that for centuries, agricultural practices have eroded the soil that farming depends on, stripping it of the organic matter vital to its productivity. Once a self-proclaimed dark green eco-pessimist, Dr. Mont…
 
When the British explored the Atlantic coast of America in the 1580s, their relations with indigenous peoples were structured by food. The newcomers, unable to sustain themselves through agriculture, relied on the local Algonquian people for resources. This led to tension, and then violence. When English raiding parties struck Algonquian villages, …
 
Bourbon whiskey has been around since nearly the beginning of the United States. Given that longevity, it has been part of the corporate law of the United States since the beginning of the corporate law of the United States. My guest today Brian Haara traces that interconnection in his new book Bourbon Justice: How Whiskey Law Shaped America (Potom…
 
In this this interview, Carrie Tippen talks with Catherine Keyser about early twentieth century fiction and the role that modern food plays in literature as a language for talking about race and racial categories. In Artificial Color: Modern Food and Racial Fictions, published in 2019 by Oxford University Press, Keyser explores the ways that modern…
 
Today on the program we will be talking about the 2003 Vertigo series The Losers written by Andy Diggle with art by Jock. The discussion will cover book one that consists of two story-lines “Ante Up” and “Double Down” in which we get to know the characters, we learn of their situation and a little of how and why they have been put on a kill list fo…
 
In this this interview, Carrie Tippen talks with Jeanette M. Fregulia about the movements of coffee beans, coffee drinking, and coffee houses from Ethiopia and Yemen, across the Mediterranean region, through Western Europe, and to the Americas. In A Rich and Tantalizing Brew: A History of How Coffee Connected the World (University of Arkansas Press…
 
Is alcohol a universal feature of human society? Why is problematic in some countries and not others? How was alcohol helped build the modern state? These are just a few of the questions that sociologist John O'Brien addresses in States of Intoxication: The Place of Alcohol in Civilisation(Routledge, 2018). His book offers a broad and diverse persp…
 
On today’s program we will be discussing the 1987 classic Spider-Man arc: Kraven’s Last Hunt. This is the outstanding and frankly amazing 6 issue story written by J.M. DeMatteis and art by Mike Zeck. Both are at the top of their game here – the writing is fantastic and the art is some of the best Zeck has ever produced. this is dark, disturbing, co…
 
Today on the program – a classic story the has touched the heart of almost every comic book fan throughout history…just kidding it’s the one where Captain America becomes a werewolf. Written by Mark Gruenwald at the tail end of his epic run on Cap this story is bonkers. I mean Captain America is turned into a werewolf in the middle of a town of wer…
 
Fascination with The Titanic has not faded, though more than 105 years have passed since its tragic sinking when so many lives were lost, and an era of gilded glamor ended. Culinary historian, Veronica Hinke’s new book, The Last Night on the Titanic: Unsinkable Drinking, Dining, and Style(Regnery History, 2019) is a celebration of the ethos of The …
 
In this this interview, Carrie Tippen talks with Nico Slate, professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, about the intersections between diet, spirituality, health, and politics for one of the world’s most famous nonviolent political activists, Mahatma Gandhi. Dr. Slate, who researches anti-racist activism in the United States and India, re…
 
Hello and welcome to the Collected Edition – a comic book podcast where we explore celebrated story-arcs from comics and creators throughout the entirety of history. Today on the program – a classic story by a legendary creator. We’ll be talking about DC: the New Frontier by Darwyn Cooke. This is a nostalgic look at the Gold and Silver Ages of comi…
 
Families in parts of rural Tanzania regularly face periods when they cut back on their meals because their own food stocks are running short and they cannot afford to buy food. Kristin D. Phillips' new book An Ethnography of Hunger: Politics, Subsistence, and the Unpredictable Grace of the Sun (Indiana University Press, 2018) provides a deeply empa…
 
Hello and welcome to the Collected Edition – a comic book podcast where we explore celebrated story-arcs from comics and creators throughout the entirety of history. Today on the program we are discussing Lone Wolf & Cub: The Assassin’s Road, the Dark Horse collected edition of the classic Manga by legendary creators Kazuo Koike and Goseki Kojima. …
 
Hello and welcome to the Collected Edition – a comic book podcast where we explore celebrated story-arcs from comics and creators throughout the entirety of history. Today on the program we are discussing Shazam!: The Monster Society of Evil – the 2007 4 issue reinterpretation of Captain Marvel by Jeff Smith of Bone fame. This is a intriguing and d…
 
From the cassoulet that won a war to the crêpe that doomed Napoleon, from the rebellions sparked by bread and salt to the new cuisines forged by empire, the history of France is intimately entwined with its gastronomic pursuits. A witty exploration of the facts and legends surrounding some of the most popular French foods and wines by a French chee…
 
The consumption of food and drink is much more than what we put in our mouth. Food and drink have been a focal point of modern social theory since the inception of agrarian capitalism and the industrial revolution. The origins of food and drink are rather complex. The construction of food and drink as authentic to a specific region is even more com…
 
In the information age, knowledge is power. Hence, facilitating the access to knowledge to wider publics empowers citizens and makes societies more democratic. How can publishers and authors contribute to this process? This podcast addresses this issue. We interview Professor Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick, whose book, The Good Drone: How Social Movements…
 
Hello and welcome to the Collected Edition – a comic book podcast where we explore celebrated story-arcs from comics and creators throughout the entirety of history. Today on the program we are discussing 2014 run on Captain Marvel by Kelly Sue DeConnick and David Lopez. In 2014 the title was relaunched – surprisingly for Marvel – with a new #1 (sa…
 
BWAH-HA-HA! Its Justice League International! Hello and welcome to the Collected Edition – a comic book podcast where we explore celebrated story-arcs from comics and creators throughout the entirety of history. Today on the program we are discussing the fabulous, wonderful, glorious Justice League International written by Keith Giffen and J. M. De…
 
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