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Best CBRL Sound podcasts we could find (updated July 2020)
Best CBRL Sound podcasts we could find
Updated July 2020
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The CBRL inspires and supports the highest quality research in the humanities and social sciences in the countries of the Levant. Through its events and outreach activities, CBRL encourages the exchange and dissemination of knowledge and ideas for the benefit of all. CBRL is a non-profit organisation. Comments and queries are welcome to: cbrldevelopment@thebritishacademy.ac.uk.
 
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show series
 
As the discourse of “Countering Violent Extremism” has become more prominent both within the Middle East and in talk about the Middle East, so too has the concept of moderation emerged as an apparent interpretive key to understanding the region and its most pressing political and theological debates. Yet if the definition of ‘extremism’ remains con…
 
In this seminar we invite discussion on the nature of partnership building in and around the museum and heritage sector in Jordan. We reflect on our own experiences of trying to develop successful partnerships, gained during the first year of our AHRC Newton-Khalidi funded research-and-development project on ‘Learning from Multicultural Amman: Enga…
 
This talk surveys the first two decades of British rule in Palestine through the eyes of its intelligence services. Who were Britain’s spymasters in Palestine? How did they try to reconcile Britain’s conflicting promises to Zionists and Palestinians? Did they understand the country and its people, or did they get it wrong? This talk shows the momen…
 
This event will explore the implications of the global Covid-19 crisis on the future of neoliberalism, and the ongoing struggles across the Middle East and North Africa, informally referred to as the 'Arab Spring'. This event will take the format of a conversation with Prof. Achcar, led by Dr. Toufic Haddad, Director of CBRL-Jerusalem's Kenyon Inst…
 
The twentieth century for Palestine and the Palestinians has been a century of denial: denial of statehood, denial of nationhood and denial of history. This book is Rashid Khalidi’s powerful response. Drawing on his family archives, he reclaims the fundamental right of any people: to narrate their history on their own terms.In this book launch, Pro…
 
'Hamas Contained' offers the first thirty-year history of the group on its own terms drawing interviews with organisation leaders, as well as publications from the group. The book maps Hamas's transition from fringe military resistance towards governance and shows how, under Israel's approach of managing rather than resolving the conflict, Hamas's …
 
'People like us? The Neolithic in Southwest Asia' given by Professor Bill Finlayson (University of Reading) at CBRL’s AGM and Crystal M-Bennett Memorial lecture with an introduction by Dr Andrew Garrard (UCL).The CBRL and its predecessors have played an important role in developing our understanding of the Southwest Asian Neolithic, one of the key …
 
Stone Men: the story of Palestine's stonemasons and the building of Israelwith author Andrew Ross in discussion with Fida ToumaUsing some of the best-quality limestone deposits in the world and drawing on generations of artisanal knowledge, Palestinian stonemasons have built almost every state in the Middle East except one of their own. Today the b…
 
Nomads, soldiers, musicians and hairdressers: Some thoughts on language and identity in the Roman Provinces of Syria and Arabia While Latin was the official language of the army, Greek was the language of government in Roman Syria and Arabia and was used among some of the population, particularly in towns and cities. However, several other language…
 
Of all subjects of scholarly inquiry, few could be more contentious than the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. How might we research and teach our way through it in an age of narrowing conversations? Two authors who have written extensively on the topic discuss their thoughts on engaging the history and contemporary politics of Palestine and Israel tod…
 
Drought is a major natural hazard in the Eastern Mediterranean, including the Levant and Middle East, with documented impacts on historical and contemporary societies. Further, this region is likely to experience increased drought risk and severity with climate change in the coming century. In this talk, Dr Benjamin Cook will review the main driver…
 
American interventions in the Middle East over the past fifty years have been a popular subject for scholars, yet the first major American diplomatic foray into the region occurred a century ago. The King-Crane Commission of 1919, sent to the Middle East by Woodrow Wilson in order to ascertain the political desires of the (no longer) Ottoman people…
 
1919 was the year in which Woodrow Wilson commissioned an Inter-Allied investigation from the Paris Peace Conference into the desires of the populations in the former Ottoman Empire. Great Britain and France pulled out of that commission leaving two Americans, Henry King and Charles Crane to lead a quixotic mission to get the borders of Greater Syr…
 
T E Lawrence played a central role in the outcome of the First World War in the Middle East. His own testimony in his famous war memoir Seven Pillars of Wisdom has now been ground-truthed by a ten-year archaeological field project. This provides a firmer base for examining his character, achievements, celebrity status, and endless cultural reconfig…
 
Gendering 'Everyday Islam' was the theme of a recent special issue of the journal Contemporary Levant - an issue that set out to address the aspect of gender in the recent debate on 'everyday Islam' in scholarship, particularly anthropology, of Muslim societies. This special issue offers a valuable contribution to rethinking the gendered meanings o…
 
Dawn Chatty, author of ‘Syria: The Making and Unmaking of a Refuge State’ and Diana Darke, author of ‘The Merchant of Syria: A History of Survival’ will each give a presentation on their recent books. Together, these talks will explore Syria’s historical embrace of refugees of all hues - Christian, Muslim and Jewish and its impact on its people. Us…
 
Dr Jennie Bradbury and Dr Philip Proudfoot bring together two branches of CBRL’s traditional disciplines – archaeology and anthropology – into conversation to examine the origins of the 2011 uprising that started in the Syrian countryside and spread to urban centres. They discuss how those same transformations in the rural economy were fundamental …
 
Major-General Sir Edward Spears was British Minister to the Levant from 1941-44, and played a vital role in Lebanese Independence in 1943. Inspired by six months painting, researching and exhibiting in Spears’s former residence in Beirut, artist, archivist and Beirut resident Tom Young pieces together a complex story full of risk, vanity, courage a…
 
Dr Mansour Nasasra presents the background to his new book - The Naqab Bedouin - A Century of Politics and Resistance. Here he presents the case for rewriting the narrative of the Arab Bedouin as passive communities and instead, by chronicling their history and politics over the last century, Dr Nasasra brings this question within the context of Pa…
 
Sarah Tobin is a social anthropologist who focuses on Islam, economic anthropology and displacement/migration in the Middle East and East Africa.In this Podcast, Dr. Tobin discusses her latest project which looks at everyday life and everyday Islam in the Syrian refugee camps of Za`atari and Azraq. Drawing on this research, she examines questions o…
 
Devastated Lands: Lebanon at the End of the Great War, 1918The First World War had brought an unprecedented degree of loss and suffering to the people of Lebanon. This lecture examines through works of literature and eyewitness accounts how the people of Lebanon looked back on the Ottoman experience and their different expectations of the post-Otto…
 
Based on personal narratives of women activists of different generations in Egypt, Lebanon and Jordan, this lecture explores the history of women’s activism in the Arab world from the 1950s onwards. It demonstrates the ways in which this activism has changed over time and what this tells us about the gendered dimensions of geopolitics in the region…
 
On the centenary of the Balfour Declaration, Professor Rosemary Hollis - a leading academic expert on the subject - gave a lecture at the British Academy in London, co-hosted by the Council for British Research in the Levant. Professor Rosemary Hollis is Professor of Middle East Policy Studies at the City University, and Member of the Council for B…
 
On the centenary of the Balfour Declaration, Dr. Victor Kattan - a leading academic expert on the subject - gave this lecture entitled, "The Rise and Fall of the Balfour Declaration" at the British Academy in London, co-hosted by the Council for British Research in the Levant. Dr Victor Kattan is a Senior Research Fellow at the Middle East Institut…
 
To mark the centenary of the Balfour Declaration, Professor Jonathan Schneer - a leading academic expert on the subject- gave a lecture at the British Academy in London hosted by the Council for British Research in the Levant and the British Academy. Jonathan Schneer is a Modern British Historian at the Georgia Institute of Technology in the School…
 
The Council for British Research in the LevantIn partnership with the Jordan Museum Presents:Settlement in the Petra Region during the Crusader PeriodDr Micaela SinibaldiTo launch the book: Crusader Landscapes in the Medieval Levant: The Archaeology and History of the Latin EastFirst Recored on: Monday, April 17th at 6 p.m.at The Jordan Museum-----…
 
Abstract:Throughout Ottoman times, the Mandaeans, a small gnostic community with roots going back to ancient Babylon, had strived to live without attracting much attention, amongst the Shi’i tribes of southern Iraq. Yet, in 1895, their head priest was accused of playing an important role in a major tribal rebellion against Ottoman authority. Using …
 
Jerusalem was a focus of medical attention from the 19th century onwards. This was for reasons owing more to religious and touristic imagination - and later growing flows of immigration - than to epidemiological reasons. One feature of the knowledge of health and healthcare was that it largely followed communal patterns of social organization. Infe…
 
Lebanon has long maintained a significant population of Syrian migrant workers. Men undertook largely seasonal work with extended periods of wage labour abroad. However, there was little evidence of permanent settlement and few signs that a second-generation of Syrians were making homes across the border. In 2011, when the first rumbling of uprisin…
 
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