show episodes
 
Join Jasmine Charlley as she sparks up the uncomfortable conversations people tend to either overlook or avoid while helping listeners get in alignment with their life's purpose. This is a podcast dedicated to self-love and spiritual growth! Helping you maximize your potential and truly having you living your best life that God has promised you! New Episodes every Sunday and Wednesday!
 
Host Coach Reilly Kilbride brings his boundless energy and deep expertise to challenge listeners to better themselves both inside and outside the box. Co-host Michael Gray provides a scaled CrossFit newbie perspective, offering insight on how beginners can modify their workouts to give them the best results wherever they are on their fitness journey. Hands-down our favorite part of the podcast is telling the stories of the men and women who show up and grind through the WOD each day. Some wo ...
 
A bi-weekly show where The Festival Lawyer (AKA Cameron Bowman) and DJ Lazer Beahm (AKA Jason Beahm) discuss legal topics and trends surrounding the festival and nightlife communities. "What do I do if a police officer wants to search my bag?" "When do the police need a search warrant to search my car?" "If my friend is having a bad trip and I take her to the medical tent, will I get arrested?" Answers to these questions, and much more, will be revealed on the 'Ask The Festival Lawyer' Podcast.
 
listening sessions for the third ear ~ cut-up collage edits & free-format mixtape compilations eclectic selective assemblage ~ ranging from difficult to easy listeningvarious genres ~ various artists instrumentals . songs . spoken_word oddly modified - modly oddifiedmerging into medleys of metapsyphonicaCustomer Review: "Constantly Unfolding" "AgentA mixes together a wide assortment of music, clips of commercials and television audio into a smooth moving assemblage that both challenges and g ...
 
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show series
 
Hey BabbleFam!In this episode, I had a very interesting convo with my friend Cameron. This was one of those nights where we were up talking about everything (per usual) but we somehow got on the topic of people not always remaining true to who they are. We also came up with this game called 'Beneath The Surface' where we utilize the wisdom of the H…
 
Anne McElvoy asks two-time Academy Award winner Hilary Swank whether the new rules intended to encourage diversity in film will work. The actress argues for change in the Oscars but worries that new diversity standards could limit which stories are told. Why does she enjoy breaking stereotypes, what it’s like filming in the covid-era—and the Hollyw…
 
Soon the pandemic will have claimed a million lives. We take a broad look at what has been learned—and the deadly mistakes still being made. Our correspondent visits Wuhan, site of the first known outbreak, to find a city that beneath the surface has much healing yet to do. And a close look at New York’s much-loved, much-derided accent. For full ac…
 
As the global covid-19 death toll nears 1 million, The Economist’s healthcare correspondent and health policy editor explain what scientists are still investigating about the virus, how long-lasting is the immune response and how the pandemic can be tamed. And, the model of Taiwan—is it “post-pandemic”? Kenneth Cukier hosts Please subscribe to The …
 
Congressional elections will decide the direction of America’s governance irrespective of the presidential pick; we reveal our statistical model of the Senate races. Tesla steals the headlines in the electric-vehicle stakes, but a vast, global industry is nipping at its heels. And remembering the astrophysicist who explained the celestial light sho…
 
Oil fuelled the 20th century, but now a huge energy shock is catalysing a shift to a new world order. Charlotte Howard, The Economist's energy and commodities editor, and host Rachana Shanbhogue investigate why this oil slump is different. They ask Spencer Dale, BP's chief economist, whether the world has passed peak oil. Daniel Yergin, author of “…
 
The Trump administration’s bid to block the Chinese app has been stymied—for now. The tussle reflects a change in how America does business, and how the internet itself may evolve. Migration in the Mediterranean is picking up again; the pandemic is making it even more perilous and political. And Japan’s canned-coffee obsession steams ahead in forei…
 
Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a liberal icon. Her death last week opens a Supreme Court vacancy for Donald Trump to fill, which could tip the court further right ahead of what might be a legally fraught election. And there is nothing that Democrats can do about it. The majority of land in Africa is neither mapped nor documented. People who can’t prove th…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: 21st century power, the birth of the Frankenfirm (09:40) and, why no one is called Linda in Saudi Arabia (15:00). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/p…
 
Donald Trump hopes fear of unrest and rising crime will appeal to the “suburban housewives” he tweets about. It’s a strategy borrowed from Richard Nixon, who first harnessed the political power of suburban voters to win the White House. But two years ago the Democrats took control of Congress by winning suburbia. Who will win the suburban vote this…
 
Thailand is bracing for a large anti-government protest, with some of the anger directed at the usually-revered monarchy. Some fear that the establishment’s patience will snap, with bloody results. Freemasonry has been one of the most contagious ideas of the modern age, spreading to every corner of the world. But the number of masons is shrinking. …
 
A former British prime minister is optimistic there will be a post-Brexit trade deal. Anne McElvoy asks him if ill-tempered trade negotiations have damaged Britain's global reputation—and what he really makes of Boris Johnson. Also, what could he have done differently when intervening in Afghanistan and did he, as alleged, run a "government of chum…
 
Podcast on the Brink is back for a new episode with hosts Jerod Morris of The Assembly Call and Alex Bozich of Inside the Hall. The show is currently available every other week. On this week’s episode, Bozich is joined by Mike DeCourcy of The Sporting News to discuss the NCAA's plan for the 2020-21 college basketball season. Among the topics discus…
 
More than a million former felons in Florida regained the right to vote in 2018. Last week, many of them lost it again. We look at the barriers to voting in America. Colombia’s militarised police force are khaki-klad, poorly paid and heavy-handed. A case of police brutality has now provoked big protests and calls for reform. And in the Netherlands,…
 
100 years after the British scientist Rosalind Franklin's birth, The Economist’s health policy editor Natasha Loder explores her scientific achievements—from photographing the double helix of DNA to discovering the first three-dimensional structure of a virus. And, how does Franklin’s work help the study of covid-19? Please subscribe to The Economi…
 
Belarus dictator, Alexander Lukashenko, has travelled to Sochi amid major protests at home to ask Vladimir Putin for help. We examine whether he will get it—and what the price might be. The possible discovery of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus could be a tantalising hint of life beyond Earth. And K-Pop, marred by sexual abuse scandals, is shed…
 
After Microsoft's takeover bid was rejected, a new deal with Oracle, a big software company, could allow the Chinese-owned social-video app to continue operating in America without a sale. The wolf, the diamonds and the foreign minister: why the biggest luxury-goods deal in history, LVMH’s purchase of Tiffany, has been put on ice. And covid-19 is p…
 
Japan’s new prime minister will be Yoshihide Suga, the son of a strawberry farmer from the country’s rural north. We look at whether he can step into the shoes of Abe Shinzo and revive Japan’s troubled economy. America may be leaving the World Health Organisation, but the institution has handled the pandemic well. And the standing of dogs in Islam …
 
The pandemic has been a giant experiment in working from home. We examine whether workers are happier and more productive using Zoom in their pyjamas than commuting in a suit. In the southern hemisphere, the seasonal flu seems to have faded, as a happy byproduct of lockdown and social distancing. And an obituary for one of Pol Pot’s murderous lieut…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, is the office finished? Land reform in poor countries (09:55), and Mexico’s unsellable presidential jet (18:10). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/pr…
 
Baby-boomers have dominated American politics since the 1990s, but this election may be their last stand. Shifting demographics do not favour Donald Trump, the boomer-in-chief. Younger Americans are more diverse, more educated, more likely to vote Democrat. Is the boomer era over? We speak to William Frey, a demographer at the Brookings Institution…
 
Relentless climate change will make devastating blazes more likely; urbanisation in woodland areas will make them more costly. Prevention measures could help—if updated and widened. “Anti-vaxxers” may undermine coming covid-vaccination efforts; we examine the history of a baseless and dangerous movement. And things turn nasty among the biker gangs …
 
Netflix has had a blockbuster year as lockdowns supercharged subscriptions. But competition is intensifying and the American streaming market is close to saturation. Anne McElvoy asks the company’s co-founder and co-CEO how much more Netflix can still grow. How does he respond to the charge that its data-driven entertainment is creating a monocultu…
 
Two Burmese soldiers have described in harrowing detail what has long been alleged: that the army targeted Muslim-minority Rohingya in a programme of ethnic cleansing. America’s Department of State has been hollowed out and wholly demoralised—and that has dire implications for global diplomacy. And a wildly popular Chinese television show reveals s…
 
Wildfires are raging across California as the state experiences a record heatwave. Climate change and irresponsible building has resulted in billions of dollars in damage. How can developers build better fire-proof homes? Also, investigative journalist James Ball on who owns the internet. And, dream on—do dreams reflect reality? Kenneth Cukier host…
 
Sanctions are tightening around the Chinese province amid suspicions of forced labour. Western firms that are reliant on the region’s cotton and other commodities are in a bind. The pandemic has shown the merits of some governments’ digitised bureaucracies, but rushing the digital shift comes with risks. And how Canada’s border closures threaten a …
 
The rise and rise of American stockmarkets has faltered; what is behind the selloff in tech shares? Netflix has had a blockbuster year but faces rising costs and stiff competition. Its co-founder Reed Hastings argues the American streaming giant still has plenty of room to grow. And, what is wrong with the concept of “net zero” carbon emissions? Pa…
 
A hurried lockdown early in the pandemic has cratered the country’s economy, and infection rates are now shooting up. More suffering lies ahead, on both counts. The United Nations peacekeeping mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo has failed for 20 years running, and now there is pressure for it to decamp. And the transatlantic tale of the ba…
 
Negotiations on Britain’s post-Brexit relationship with Europe were floundering—even before revelations it may essentially rewrite parts of the last pact it struck. Since the space race’s early days, satellites have been involved in defence. Now a new threat looms: armed conflict between the satellites themselves. And a card game reveals the Lebane…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, America’s ugly election: How bad could it get? How Abe Shinzo changed Japan (8:35) and why Britons walk their dogs so much (16:00). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoff…
 
Podcast on the Brink is back for a new episode with hosts Jerod Morris of The Assembly Call and Alex Bozich of Inside the Hall. The show is currently available every other week. On this week’s episode, Bozich is joined by Morris for the first time since May to discuss a variety of topics. Among them: • The proposed start date for college basketball…
 
November’s election threatens to be ugly. President Trump’s supporters are clashing with Black Lives Matter protesters in Portland. Covid-19 complicates voting. The result may not be clear on election night. Many Americans worry the election could herald violent discord and a constitutional crisis rather than a smooth exercise of democracy. Should …
 
Alongside a green-minded, 100bn-euro stimulus, President Emmanuel Macron’s recovery plan borrows ideas from the post-war past to imagine a post-covid future. The mysterious arrest of Paul Rusesabagina, hero of the film “Hotel Rwanda”, shows just how far the country’s leaders will go to suppress dissent. And a careful, revealing study of nappy price…
 
In the face of electoral upsets and viral black swans, Anne McElvoy asks the cofounder of the Good Judgement “superforecaster” project whether today’s future-gazers should still rely on historical precedent. As pollsters compete to predict who will win the US presidential election, what lessons have yet to be learned from 2016? And, where to spot t…
 
The outcome of Jamaica’s election isn’t much in doubt. What’s uncertain is how the wider Caribbean can handle rock-bottom tourism and looming hurricane risks amid the pandemic. North Korea’s leadership at last admitted to the hardships of covid-19; the coming human cost could rival that of the famine in the 1990s. And why African countries put out …
 
Governments around the world are approving covid-19 drugs and vaccines at an unprecedented speed, but Natasha Loder, The Economist's Health Policy Editor, warns of the dangers that this could cause. Also, is Elon Musk's plan to link a computer to human brains science or spin? And, take a deep breath—author James Nestor on improving the quality of o…
 
Millions of schoolchildren are heading back to classes, many of them online. We examine the evidence on virtual learning and how it deepens inequalities. Dubai is a glittering financial hub, connecting the Middle East, Asia and Europe—but to keep its position it will have to shed its dirty-money reputation. And why the pandemic has readers pulling …
 
While big tech and Wall Street are breaking records, main-street businesses are struggling to survive; governments and central banks must decide whether they can afford to dig deeper to help. Six months into the pandemic, host Rachana Shanbhogue asks Patrick Foulis, The Economist's business affairs editor, Wall Street correspondent Alice Fulwood an…
 
Five years ago, a vast wave of migrants and refugees began to spill into the country. We examine their fates amid a tangle of bureaucracy. Even for the uninfected, the coronavirus has caused widespread “collective trauma”; we ask about its effects and how to heal from it. And Palestinians sneak to the beach as security forces look the other way. Fo…
 
In this episode we consider the future of travel. What if aviation doesn’t recover from covid-19? We find out how one airline is turning crisis into opportunity, consider how to make flying greener—and examine how the combination of the pandemic, and growing concern about climate change, is affecting attitudes to travel. Tom Standage hosts Read mor…
 
Japan’s longest-serving prime minister leaves behind a mixed bag of policy successes and shortcomings. We examine his legacy and ask what his successor faces. The annual meeting of central bankers in Jackson Hole—online, of course—revealed research suggesting today’s economic woes will ring down for decades to come. And the curious appeal of in-fli…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: what Putin fears, (9:10) Trump at the Republican National Convention and (16:10) France’s university to rival MIT. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/…
 
Grandees were gone from this week’s Republican convention, replaced by Trump family members and ordinary folk caught in the culture wars. The president has also kicked aside the three pillars that propped up Ronald Reagan’s Republicans: moral and global leadership plus sound finances. What do Republicans stand for now? We speak to Hogan Gidley from…
 
Another shooting of an unarmed black man by police has reopened wounds still not healed after George Floyd’s killing—and, like all else, the unrest is being politicised. Montenegro’s president is Europe’s longest-serving leader, but anti-government sentiment has mounted ahead of Sunday’s election. And a look back on the life of Julian Bream, who re…
 
The world’s universities face a new academic year like no other. Anne McElvoy asks Janet Napolitano, until recently president of the sprawling University of California system, whether higher education can pass the test of covid-19. Can universities survive without legions of high-paying international students, and convince increasingly sceptical yo…
 
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