show episodes
 
Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Brooks and Capehart, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. ...
 
We live in a confusing world… so if you’ve ever stopped and asked yourself WHY something matters, we’re here to help. Every week Adam Toy and Dave McIvor will ask one big question and uncover the answer to help you truly understand what’s going on around you. They'll try to get to the bottom of the issue by chatting with experts, journalists and even folks directly involved. They may not have all the answers to climate change, world politics or the economy BUT you can join them on this weekl ...
 
CBC Radio's All In A Day is Ottawa's number one afternoon drive program -- and covers all of Eastern Ontario and West Quebec. Join Alan Neal each weekday for a fresh take on the news you need to know, regular weather and traffic updates, an overview of the best cultural events the area has to offer, and insightful interviews with politicians, musicians, thinkers and more. Contact the show at allinaday@cbc.ca or follow along on Twitter @cbcallinaday
 
Toronto is home, but how well do you really know it? Host Dani Stover brings you in-depth interviews and stories about the wild, random, important, and under-appreciated places, people and things that shape the city. Regular episodes shine a light on the corners of Toronto you never knew existed and the ones you've always wanted to know more about.
 
RezBirds is a team of four Indigenous men that are tackling the hard hitting issues of modern society with eloquent lunacy. If you like deep issues but would rather they went off the deep end than into an ivory tower, then this podcast is a must listen. The team uses adult language and themes and it is not a PG program. Listener discretion is advised.
 
Inside Property is a bi-monthly podcast presented by Richard Blanco in collaboration with Share Radio. The programme aims to provide commentary and analysis on a wide range of property and housing related issues. The new 15 minute NLA Podcast is available here (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/nla-podcast/id1441951844?mt=2) . Richard Blanco is a landlord and developer based in East London with properties across six London boroughs. He is London Representative for the National Landlords As ...
 
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show series
 
More details about the mass shooting at an Indianapolis FedEx facility Thursday night continue to emerge, including the names of victims, that the FBI had previously interviewed the shooter, and that half of those dead from the shooting come from a Sikh background, raising more questions around the killer's motive. Lawrence Andrea, Public Safety an…
 
It’s the second half of our conversation with artist Chief Lady Bird about her decision to design a beer can label in support of Indigenous women’s causes. In part one, we learned about how it all came to be and some of the reaction that’s poured forth in its wake. This time, we go deeper into popular misunderstandings and misrepresentations of dru…
 
The Derek Chauvin trial and shootings of Daunte Wright and Adam Toledo by the police have renewed calls for police reform. A Marshall Project investigation, which reviewed 10 large city departments and its field trainers, found that the officers and their training methods are one of the biggest roadblocks to police reform. Marshall Project staff wr…
 
Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh and husband of Queen Elizabeth II, who died last week at 99, was laid to rest at St. George's Chapel on Saturday. The funeral, which was an intimate affair due to COVID-19 restrictions in the UK, was attended by only 30 members of the royal family, including the Queen, who sat alone. Special Correspondent Ryan Chilc…
 
The latest on COVID-19 and vaccines: Johnson & Johnson shots continue to be on pause as health officials investigate extremely rare side effects; Moderna and Pfizer vaccination appointments are becoming easier to snag in many states; and what scientists are learning about the vaccine's efficacy against variants and 'breakthrough infections.' ProPub…
 
Police in Indianapolis have spent Friday looking for answers after a gunman shot eight people to death and then killed himself. The incident prompted President Biden to call the nation's gun violence incidents a "national embarrassment." The bloodshed stunned a city that's been hard hit by gun violence, and its mayor is calling for national action.…
 
Questions over the fatal shooting and the role of the police in the death of a teen are front and center in Chicago. There, the mayor, city officials and community leaders are taking stock of how police respond with force, and whether more changes are needed. Stephanie Sy speaks to Hans Menos, the Vice President of Law Enforcement Initiatives for t…
 
In our news wrap Friday, the U.S. Justice department rescinded a Trump-era curb on consent decrees, making it easier to investigate police departments and press for major changes in use of force. An Indiana man has become the first person to plead guilty to federal charges in the January assault on the U.S. Capitol. Russia responded to new U.S. san…
 
Friday saw the Biden administration giving mixed messages on refugee admission. After receiving blowback for keeping the historically low refugee cap set by President Trump, the White House quickly reversed its position, and said it will move to lift them. Yamiche Alcindor has more on the flip-flop, and discusses it with Jenny Yang, the vice presid…
 
It's been a record-breaking year of bills proposed in state legislatures that would limit transgender rights - from access to medical care to sports participation. Despite that, a new PBS NewsHour/NPR/Marist poll found that Americans across the political spectrum oppose those efforts, and more than half of people personally know someone who is tran…
 
New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including police shootings of people of color, and the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/fundersBy PBS NewsHour
 
This weekend, Mickey Guyton will become the first Black woman to co-host the Academy of Country Music Awards. She was the only Black woman to be nominated for an award this year. But as Amna Nawaz reports, a number of Black women are starting to gain traction in the genre. It's part of our ongoing arts and culture coverage, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is …
 
Southwestern Ontario Hub journalist Mary Baxter and Northwestern Ontario Hub journalist Charnel Anderson discuss how the pandemic's third wave is affecting the communities they cover - from case control and vaccination progress to the impacts on small business and how people are feeling under the stay-at-home order. See omnystudio.com/listener for …
 
A roundup of our week of programming begins with a look at how the province is doing with vaccinations. Then, will paid sick days ever come to Ontario? And, our democracy panel discusses whether traditional poltiical parties are still relevant. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.By TVO | Steve Paikin
 
One industry that's been hardest hit by Ontario's lockdowns is personal care since it's not considered an essential service. Many owners of hair salons, estheticians, and nail spas see no scientific reason to be shut down completely for most of the last year. We talk to a few personal-care business owners from across the province about their challe…
 
Canadian baseball legend Fergie Jenkins says plans for a statue of him outside Wrigley Field in Chicago are "the icing on the cake." He tells us about a career that took him from Chatham, Ont., to Chicago, his time playing for the Harlem Globetrotters, and why he wants to see another baseball franchise in Montreal.…
 
After a sexual assault victim secured a conviction against her ex-husband, she shared the court transcript with family. A judge fined the Ontario woman more than $2,000 for breaking a publication ban on her own name. We discuss the case with Colin Westman, a retired Ontario court judge in Kitchener-Waterloo; Emilie Taman, an Ottawa lawyer and co-ho…
 
President Joe Biden announced a series of tough new sanctions against Russia Thursday, as the historic adversaries confront one another again both in cyberspace, and on the ground in Europe and beyond. The Biden administration targeted individuals and the state itself. John Yang speaks to Georgetown University's Angela Stent, and investigative jour…
 
In our news wrap Thursday, the CDC reported nearly half of all American adults have now had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, and about 30 percent are fully vaccinated. Meanwhile, India recorded a staggering 200,000 new infections today, forcing lockdowns in New Delhi and Mumbai. And, former police officer Kim Potter had her first court appe…
 
Lawmakers Thursday continued to assemble their picture of what went wrong on January 6. An internal watchdog testified about his ongoing review of U.S. Capitol Police, and shared his initial conclusions about why their defense failed that day after a pro-trump mob stormed the building. Congressional correspondent Lisa Desjardins has the report. PBS…
 
It's the story of how a bartender's son rose to become second in line to the presidency. Former House speaker John Boehner's new book, "On The House: A Washington Memoir," is a memoir brimming with expletives and unfiltered takes on today's politics and politicians on both sides of the aisle. He joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the book, Joe Biden, a…
 
More than 30 million Americans have gone without health insurance in the last year. Other high-income nations cover their entire populations for a lot less money than the U.S. already spends. But does a universal health care system help save lives in a pandemic? For answers, William Brangham looks to our northern neighbor Canada and its single-paye…
 
A recent poll shows a majority of Canadians believe that political parties serve their own interests over those of voters. Why the mistrust? Can anything be done about it? Or is it an indication that political parties as we know them are on their way out. In this week's instalment of The Democracy Agenda, our joint venture with The Toronto Star, St…
 
Preston Manning, the founding leader of the former Reform Party of Canada, is very worried about the state of Canadian democracy and he has plenty of ideas about what can be done to improve it. He talks to Steve Paikin about his book, "Do Something: 365 Ways You Can Strengthen Canada." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
The trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin, who is charged with murder in the death of George Floyd last May, is nearing its conclusion. The trial is being watched closely all around the country and internationally. The defense finished calling its witnesses Thursday, and Chauvin opted not to testify. Special correspondent Fred De Sam Lazaro …
 
The latest selection for our "Now Read This" book club, Jessica Bruder's "Nomadland," documents a growing phenomenon in the country -- a "wandering tribe" of seasonal workers. It has inspired a new movie of the same name. The film was the big winner at the British Academy Film Awards, and has multiple Oscar nominations. Jeffrey Brown has the latest…
 
Canada’s economy may have slowed through the pandemic, but the housing market has remained hot. And, unlike past years where price increases have been focused on major centres, we’re seeing growth right across the country, due in part to an exodus to the suburbs. Tristin Hopper from the National Post explains why people are flocking to smaller cent…
 
Our virtual road trip, Canada's Road Ahead, takes us north to Dawson City, Yukon, where low COVID-19 case numbers and a high vaccination rate are starting to make life feel normal again. But for locals who work in the city's tourism industry, it's vital that the rest of the world catches up. We talk to Brad Whitelaw, owner of the Triple J Hotel; an…
 
Where are the vaccines? Vaccine clinics are having to close and cancel appointments in some of the hardest-hit areas in Ontario, and supply issues remain top of mind across the country. We talk to Kevin Smith, president and CEO of University Health Network in Toronto, and André Picard, health columnist for the Globe and Mail.…
 
Freelance journalist Georgia Fort discusses the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, who is being tried in Minneapolis for second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd. And as the city reels from the death of Daunte Wright — killed this week at a traffic stop — we talk to Pastor Curti…
 
GraceLife Church and Montreal riots against anti-health directives had us wondering why mainstream narratives are about vaccine hesitancy focus so much on racialized communities. And journalists are officially hella tired. Freelance journalist Fatima Syed and Torstar Editor Evy Kwong co-host. Further reading: Evy's piece to combat vaccine hesitancy…
 
President Joe Biden formally announced Wednesday that the United States would withdraw all troops from Afghanistan by September 11, 20 years since the fateful day that led to the U.S. invasion. More than 2,300 American soldiers have lost their lives in what's become the country's longest war. John Yang begins our coverage. PBS NewsHour is supported…
 
In our news wrap Wednesday, Kim Potter, the former police officer who fatally shot Daunte Wright outside Minneapolis was charged with second-degree manslaughter. Then, a scathing new report blames the leadership of the Capitol Police for a raft of failures before January 6. And, the Biden administration has proposed ending a Trump-era ban on federa…
 
Former financier Bernie Madoff, who organized the largest fraud in wall street's history, died Wednesday. He swindled major charities, universities and celebrities out of billions, and was serving 150 years in prison. Stephanie Sy has our report about his rise and fall. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders…
 
Judy Woodruff speaks with three experts on Afghanistan. Retired Lt. Gen. Doug Lute served in both the George W. Bush and Obama administrations focusing on Afghanistan. Annie Pforzheimer was acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Afghanistan until 2019. And David Sedney was Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Afghanistan, Pakistan and …
 
More than half of public schools around the country are back to full time in-person classes. But many school districts still are using distance or hybrid learning, and there are many questions ahead about what it will take to reopen more fully in the coming months. Amna Nawaz looks at those questions and more with Secretary of Education, Miguel Car…
 
"Unascertained" is a new TVO podcast that investigates the death of Soleiman Faqiri, a man suffering from schizophrenia who was found dead in his cell following an altercation with correctional officers at Ontario's Lindsay facility. Yusuf Zine, host and co-producer, joins Nam Kiwanuka to discuss the case. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy in…
 
Fifty years ago, a deadly riot at Kingston Penitentiary shook the country. It was a response to decades of horrendous conditions that led inmates to take over the prison. Catherine Fogarty chronicles the event, its aftermath, and what's changed in the years since in her new book: "Murder on the Inside: The True Story of The Deadly Riot at Kingston …
 
Amid national outrage over the police killing of George Floyd in May of 2020, and other police-shootings of Black people, the movement to "defund the police" became a rallying cry to reimagine our approach to public safety. In this show, we'll hear from scholars about how we can build a global movement for abolition.…
 
Calgary writer Ashley Bristowe discusses her new memoir, My Own Blood, which tells the story of her son Alexander, who was born with a rare genetic condition. She wants people to understand what life is like for families of children with disabilities — and to be brave in creating communities that include them.…
 
Amid financial trouble, Laurentian University has cut more than 60 programs, and more than 100 faculty positions. Where does that leave a school that billed itself as unique, connecting the English, French and Indigenous cultures of northern Ontario? We speak to first-year student Aly Beauparlant, former faculty member Darrel Manitowabi, and Glen J…
 
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