Canadas National Arts Centre public
[search 0]
More

Download the App!

show episodes
 
N
NMC Rough Cuts

1
NMC Rough Cuts

National Music Centre | Centre National de Musique

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Daily+
 
NMC Rough Cuts presented by Bell is a podcast series by the National Music Centre (NMC). Over five episodes, we'll feature a handful of Canadian artists, who've produced an original song during a one-day recording session inside NMC’s famed studios at Studio Bell in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Hear the song, the story behind it, and learn what motivates each artist. The series is hosted by NMC's in-house engineer Graham Lessard (Basia Bulat, Kevin Drew, Reuben and the Dark, Stars, Timber Timbr ...
 
One of Canada’s best political analysts, Paul Wells, sits down with leading political figures and social influencers for a conversation on the most compelling issues and news of the day. The monthly series is produced by CPAC in partnership with Maclean’s and the National Arts Centre. Maclean’s magazine senior writer Paul Wells is one of Canada’s leading political journalists. In nearly a quarter century on Parliament Hill he has covered four prime ministers and seven federal elections. His ...
 
Research in Canada is a national success story worth celebrating: it is also a remarkable story worth sharing with Canadians. The Canada Foundation for Innovation gives researchers the tools they need to think big and innovate. By investing in state-of-the-art facilities and equipment in Canada’s universities, colleges, research hospitals and non-profit research institutions, the CFI is helping to attract and retain the world’s top talent, to train the next generation of researchers, to supp ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
Watch the latest edition of NMC Rough Cuts presented by Bell, featuring Pat Clifton. A conscious rapper, producer, songwriter and pianist, Clifton makes sense of the world through intimate, sometimes unapologetic, storytelling. In this episode, Clifton discusses and performs his song, "The Light." NMC Rough Cuts presented by Bell is a podcast serie…
 
JUNO Award-winning singer-songwriter Celeigh Cardinal is featured in the premiere episode of NMC Rough Cuts presented by Bell. In this instalment, she talks about her song, "There Ain't No Way," and performs a new arrangement of the tune. NMC Rough Cuts presented by Bell is a podcast series by the National Music Centre (NMC). Over five episodes, we…
 
This podcast is only available in French. Une chercheuse à l’Université de Montréal se concentre sur le sommeil des femmes. Julie Carrier of the Université de Montréal has devoted her academic career to the fascinating world of sleep, using equipment she received from the CFI to monitor the slumber patterns and sleep disorders of her test subjects.…
 
This podcast is only available in French. A researcher at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre explores ways to improve drugs Stéphane Laporte, a researcher at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, became interested in pharmacological research when he noticed just how often drugs were associated wit…
 
This podcast is only available in French. One of the co-founders of LensVector talks about the origins of their molecular lens. Tigran Galstian, professor in the Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Optics at Université Laval and co-founder of LensVector, explains the invention of a molecular lens that could, among other things, improve o…
 
This podcast is only available in French. A researcher at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre studies the link between genetics and cardiovascular disease. In the 1980s, when Jacques Genest was starting out in the Faculty of Medicine, cardiovascular disease was the leading cause of death among Canadians. Dr. Genest and his…
 
Ian Clark, professor of Earth sciences at the University of Ottawa, explains how radiocarbon dating using an accelerator mass spectrometer can help resolve significant issues surrounding contaminated environments. This podcast is part of an in-depth report on the Advanced Research Complex.By Canada Foundation for Innovation
 
Constantin Polychronakos has devoted his career to studying the genetics of juvenile diabetes and treating children afflicted with the disease. As head of the Child Health and Human Development Program at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, he is working towards new interventions to replace the need for painful daily insu…
 
Chris McGibbon from the University of New Brunswick is researching robotic exoskeletons to help people with brain and spinal cord injuries regain mobility. The fundamental goal of the John R. Evans Leaders Fund is to help universities attract and retain the world’s top researchers by giving them the tools they need to push the boundaries of their w…
 
Basil Petrof heads the Program for Translational Research in Respiratory Diseases at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. His research group participated in a clinical trial that proved the efficacy of a new therapy that burns away the muscle tissue in the lungs of asthmatic patients to help open their airways. It’s this k…
 
PhD student in Oceanography at the Université Laval, Jordan Grigor, discusses his research on the Arctic arrow worm, known as the tiger of the plankton. He also gives a glimpse into life aboard the CCGS Amundsen, Canada's only dedicated Arctic research vessel. Image credit: Cyril AubryBy Canada Foundation for Innovation
 
With an aging population, the need for joint replacements is increasing. Researchers at Queen's University are working to solve this problem. Dr. John Rudan, an orthopaedic surgeon at Kingston General Hospital and a principal investigator at the Human Mobility Research Centre discusses their technique.…
 
Spindly black spruce cloak the mountains and rise from the banks of the Skeena River, one of the longest free-flowing rivers in British Columbia. But Jonathan Moore is more interested in what lies below the water’s surface — thousands of sockeye salmon charging up these channels in their annual marathon to spawn. Moore, a biologist at Simon Fraser …
 
The University of Victoria’s Verena Tunnicliffe recalls the open hostility she faced when she first began boarding research ships to conduct her oceanographic studies. In one instance, the cook refused to sail, saying it was either him or her. Guess who walked that plank? Tunnicliffe persevered, despite the male-dominated nautical culture, to answe…
 
Leslie Weir, the first female university librarian at the University of Ottawa, led a team who received $20 million from the CFI in 1997 to help 64 Canadian university libraries make the leap from print to digital. Prior to the Canadian Site Licensing Project, researchers — or their grad students, Weir says coyly — would physically track down artic…
 
​John Braun from the University of British Columbia will use his new data visualization lab to make sense of the complex data behind wildfire science. The fundamental goal of the John R. Evans Leaders Fund is to help universities attract and retain the world’s top researchers by giving them the tools they need to push the boundaries of their work. …
 
The holiday shopping spree of the future will be nothing like the crowded, stuffy gauntlet of today, according to Brian Greenspan, director of Carleton University’s Hyperlab. Greenspan and his students research the implications of a Big Brother culture that inevitably comes about when we live in the cloud. In this podcast, Greenspan takes listeners…
 
In her two-pronged study, York University psychology professor Melody Wiseheart found that students’ test scores fell by 10 percent when asked to surf through Facebook, YouTube and their email while simultaneously trying to pay attention to a lecture. But it was the grades of students seated around their wired peers that caught Wiseheart by surpris…
 
Pediatrician and epidemiologist Michael Kramer studies the long-term effects of pre-term births, including by Caesarean section or induced labour, as well as other adverse pregnancy outcomes such as still births and infant mortality. He will oversee these types of important population health studies as the director for the Centre for Outcomes Resea…
 
In 2001, pediatrician and epidemiologist Michael Kramer and his colleagues published the largest ever randomized trial on breastfeeding which followed 17,000 babies into their teenage years and showed links between how exclusively and for how long they were breastfed and improved cognitive development at an early school age. Kramer will oversee the…
 
Laureen McIntyre from the University of Saskatchewan aims to improve children’s literacy and speaking abilities through her new community-based research lab, where she and her team can observe and document children’s interactions with others. The fundamental goal of the John R. Evans Leaders Fund is to help universities attract and retain the world…
 
In our final episode of season one Ma tells us about the time she encountered the friendship centre murderer! Then we hear the first story she ever told, where recording all this began. She tells me how she ended up at Robert Kennedys funeral! I recorded this way before the COVID-19 Pandemic started, but decided maybe everyone could use a healthy d…
 
Jean-Jacques Van Vlasselaer and Marjolaine Fournier study The Four Temperaments, the second symphony by Carl Nielsen. The hosts find this Danish composer a little enigmatic and difficult to reach. They explore the world around him at the time of this composition, and talk about his music in that context. Find out how he lived his life, allowed his …
 
Marjolaine Fournier and Jean-Jacques van Vlasselaer describe the music of Edvard Grieg’s Peer Gynt, his A minor Piano Concerto, and his C minor Symphony. His music, his melodies and his small works for piano are simply perfect. Can you believe that his symphony, composed in 1864 when Grieg was only 21, was played in 1981 for the first time? Listen …
 
Marjolaine Fournier and Jean-Jacques van Vlasselaer talk about two Concertos for orchestra: one by Béla Bartók and the other by Witold Lutosławski. They take a moment to explain the format of a concerto for orchestra (what do you mean, a concerto without a soloist?), and the dialog that develops within the orchestra performing it. Bartók and Lutosł…
 
Jean-Jacques van Vlasselaer and Marjolaine Fournier discuss Verdi’s Requiem, first performed in Milan in 1874. The text for this was written in about 1250, when a requiem was meant to be music to sustain the mass of the death. Our hosts uncover some history about the evolution of requiem works and their cultural significance, and shed light on Verd…
 
The little 17 year old kid from Kahnawake signs up for a student exchange and gets selected to go to Europe! For what is only supposed to be a few months, Ma ends up having a year long adventure of a lifetime! Get ready for a story that involves a raid at an Algerian belly dancing club in France and being interrogated by Russians in Berlin!…
 
Marjolaine Fournier and Jean-Jacques van Vlasselaer discuss the masterful Claude Vivier, composer from Québec. His music, which can be characterized as “beautiful, immense, tragic, inspiring,” is celebrated and heard regularly in France, Germany, Holland and Austria. Lonely Child will be featured during the NAC Orchestra’s tour in Europe in May 201…
 
This country’s extraordinary real-life research facilities provide a wondrous backdrop for Sawyer’s imagined futures, proving you don’t have to stray far from home to be inspired by leading-edge science Award-winning author Robert Sawyer dreamed of a career in science, but was discouraged by the state of Canadian research in the 1970s. So he decide…
 
Antibiotic resistance is an increasingly serious problem - threatening to alter modern medicine as we know it. It's an area of research that has captured Gerry Wright's attention for over two decades. As the director of the Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research at McMaster University, Wright and his team have made some excit…
 
Marjolaine Fournier and Jean Jacques van Vlasselaer compare Brahms’ and Schumann’s first symphonies. They explore the relationships between the two composers and Clara Wieck. Schumann was alive in an extraordinary and explosive decade, Clara was nine years younger and a remarkable pianist, and Brahms, a generation apart, grew up in an entirely diff…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login