show episodes
 
Join English barrister and Reuters correspondent turned writer, podcaster, radio show host, award-winning tech journalist and sometime werewolf hunter Charles Christian for a weekly feast of folklore, magick and scary tales. If general off-the-wall weirdness is your thing then the Weird Tales Radio Show has something for everyone, with its magazine format designed for all fans of ghosts, geek, magick, folklore, urban myths, legends and witchcraft but with a focus on fun and strangeness that ...
 
Author Dana Schwartz explores the stories of some of history’s most fascinating royals: the tyrants and the tragic, the murderers and the murdered, and everyone in between. Because when you’re wearing a crown, mistakes often mean blood. New episodes every two weeks, on Tuesdays.
 
The following Tales are meant to be submitted to the young reader as an introduction to the study of Shakespeare, for which purpose his words are used whenever it seemed possible to bring them in; and in whatever has been added to give them the regular form of a connected story, diligent care has been taken to select such words as might least interrupt the effect of the beautiful English tongue in which he wrote: therefore, words introduced into our language since his time have been as far a ...
 
In The Adventures of Ulysses, Charles Lamb re-tells the story of Ulysses’s journey from Troy to his own kingdom of Ithaca. The book uses Homer’s The Odyssey as the basis for the story, but it isn’t a direct translation of the Greek classic. The book is considered a modern version of the epic tale when it was published in 1808. In the preface of the book, Lamb said that he made the narration of the story faster so that more readers would be attracted to it. To begin with, Homer’s Odyssey is a ...
 
Lamb used Homer's Odyssey as the basis for the re-telling of the story of Ulysses's journey back from Troy to his own kingdom of Ithaca. Not a direct translation and deemed modern in its time, Lamb states in the preface that, "I have gained a rapidity to the narration which I hope will make it more attractive and give it more the air of a romance to young readers". (Summary by Rebecca)
 
Mr H is a farce that was first performed at Drury Lane in 1806. The plot is slender and revolves around a single rather feeble joke, but the characters are skilfully drawn and the sharp observations of contemporary fashion do much to divert the listener from the weakness of the central theme. More a comedy of manners rather than a true farce, this short play is best enjoyed as a gentle romp through the eccentricities of the Regency period. (Summary by Algy Pug) Cast Mr H: Peter Bishop Landlo ...
 
This is a collection of 6 delightful stories about children by some of the best authors of the period: Charles Lamb, Mary Lamb, Maria Edgeworth and Alicia Catherine Mant. These stories are well written and although they feature children and their escapades, clearly can be enjoyed by adults as well if not more. - Summary by Phil Chenevert
 
Jane Austen, WB Yeats, Chesterton, Shaw... these are personal and intelligent short essays on a selection of great (and great-ish) writers: some well known, and some a bit more obscure to the average reader today. Robert Lynd (1879 – 1949) is best known as a literary essayist and Irish nationalist. He published many essays, all written in an easy, conversational style. Lynd was an essayist after the manner of Charles Lamb, and deserves to be better known. A complete list of his works is avai ...
 
Britten's operas are firmly established in the international repertoire: according to Operabase, they are performed worldwide more than those of any other composer born in the 20th century, and only Puccini and Richard Strauss come ahead of him if the list is extended to all operas composed after 1900. Britten went to various sources for his stories from the Bible to Japanese noh plays. This is a collection of twelve of the source stories. All but one are the original texts; the one exceptio ...
 
This little gem of a book was probably the first introduction to Shakespeare that most readers have had as children. Tales from Shakespeare was written in 1807 by a young clerk called Charles Lamb in the offices of the East India Company. Lamb co-authored them with his beloved sister Mary. The pair lived together for life, having gone through immense trauma caused by mental illness and tragedy. However, far from being a melancholy duo, they led an active and ample social life in the company ...
 
The independent-minded book review magazine that combines good looks, good writing and a personal approach. Slightly Foxed introduces its readers to books that are no longer new and fashionable but have lasting appeal. Good-humoured, unpretentious and a bit eccentric, it’s more like a well-read friend than a literary magazine. Come behind the scenes with the staff of Slightly Foxed to learn what makes this unusual literary magazine tick, meet some of its varied friends and contributors, and ...
 
The History of King Lear is an adaptation by Nahum Tate of William Shakespeare's King Lear. It first appeared in 1681, some seventy-five years after Shakespeare's version, and is believed to have replaced Shakespeare's version on the English stage in whole or in part until 1838. Unlike Shakespeare's tragedy, Tate's play has a happy ending, with Lear regaining his throne, Cordelia marrying Edgar, and Edgar joyfully declaring that "truth and virtue shall at last succeed." Regarded as a tragico ...
 
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show series
 
Dr Felicity James, author of Charles Lamb, Coleridge and Wordsworth: Reading Friendship in the 1790s and current custodian of Charles’s writing chair, introduces the Slightly Foxed editors to siblings at the heart of a literary circle. In their Tales from Shakespeare, gentle-hearted drunken-dog Charles wrote the tragedies and Mary, often chided for…
 
A candidate who didn't run for President. A candidate who ran, but didn't know he was running. A candidate who didn't want to run, but had no choice. A candidate who ran without seeming to run, and a candidate who ran but died before the votes were counted. An election that didn't happen, but would have been a humdinger if it did. A President who t…
 
Hi, Noble Blood fans! In case you haven't heard, we just released a brand new podcast from Aaron Mahnke's Grim and Mild, in partnership with Blumhouse productions. It's a spooky 13-day journey to Halloween, featuring binaural audio for a three-dimensional listening experience. As the newest arrival to Hawthorne Manor, the caretaker himself (Keegan-…
 
Abraham Lincoln running against...Sam Houston? It is not a far-fetched idea that Abraham Lincoln might have faced Texas hero Sam Houston in the election of 1860, as he was under serious consideration to be one of the candidates in what became a four-way Presidential election of 1860. And he would have been a formidable one, except backroom candleli…
 
In Episode 136 of the Weird Tales Radio Show we talk to practising witch, author and expert on all things fairy Morgan Daimler about the Wheel of the Year, Samhain, Halloween and the practice of withcraft and virtual covens in times of a pandemic. Plus we talk about a much travelled mummy, the cancellation of Nottingham Goose Fair and the Punkie Ni…
 
Jimmy Carter's speechwriter said "We were 30 points up, but unfortunately we had to campaign." A tight race turns to a veritable battle of gaffes between two newbie Presidential candidates. A surprise challenger and an unelected President. We go over the close '76 election, including a last-minute event that almost changed history.…
 
Truman's high-tech train, Dewey's We Go High optimism and the defeat that made him cling to it, Truman's risky calling of a Session of Congress and how it went badly for him in a few ways, and Dewey's decision to get angry, unfortunately first at an average citizen and only later at his opponent. This and other lesser-known stories of the 1948 Elec…
 
In Episode 135 of the Weird Tales Radio Show we talk to horror author William Meikle about his writing career, we talk to one of the producers of the highly rated new horror movie Saint Maud. Plus we visit Deadman’s Island, look at Memento Mori coins, avoid Jenny Greenteeth, dabble in some magick – and did you know Dracula’s castle is up for sale? …
 
Georg Friedrich, the great-great-grandson of Kaiser Wilhelm II is embroiled in a legal battle with Germany, attempting to reclaim millions of euros worth of property that was taken from his family during the Soviet occupation of Germany. But the law that allows property reclamation has one major caveat: property is forfeited if your ancestors signi…
 
After the four TV debates between Richard Nixon and John F. Kennedy in 1960, there was talk of a fifth. That talk didn't result in another TV debate, but did provide one more campaign issue for a very tight election, and developed a new thing - TV debate negotiations. We look at 1960, the fifth debate talk, and other reasons besides the debates tha…
 
In Episode 134 of the Weird Tales Radio Show we talk to journalist and writer Matt Swayne about the ghosts of rock ’n' roll and country music, including the Forever 27 Club. Links: Weird Tales Radio Show archive - https://www.urbanfantasist.com/weird-tales-radio-show www.mattswayne.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
In Episode 133 of the Weird Tales Radio Show we talk Arthurian legends scholar and author John Matthews about the legends and history surrounding King Arthur’s magician Merlin. A man of many guises, from druid, to Celtic warrior, to shaman to prophet, to wizard, to royal adviser and even lover. Links: Weird Tales Radio Show archive https://www.urba…
 
Why did we go to war in Iraq in 2003? What happened in the 18 months between 9/11 and March 2003 that drove that decision? What was it about George Bush and Tony Blair that meant war was in the cards? And what motivated these two men at the peak of their powers – with the world on their side – to pursue a war that would prove to be historically unp…
 
In Episode 132 of the Weird Tales Radio Show we talk London-based eclectic witch Lucya Starza about witchcraft, wicca, practical magick and, curiously, the Call of Cthulhu role playing games plus we also revisit the story of St Cyprian, the patron saint of sorcerers and witches. Links: Weird Tales Radio Show archive - https://www.urbanfantasist.com…
 
The 1880 election was close, with Democrats and Republicans seeking an advantage in its waning days when a letter hits a major city newspaper purporting to be in the hand of a candidate. It is a letter that could turn the election. With Todd Arrington, a historian at the James A. Garfield National Historic Site in Mentor, Ohio, we discuss James A. …
 
In Episode 131 of the Weird Tales Radio Show our main event is an interview with US crime scene investigator Paul Rimmasch discussing true tales of law enforcement encounters with the paranormal and the strange. Links: Weird Tales Radio Show archive - https://www.urbanfantasist.com/weird-tales-radio-show https://www.amazon.com/Fingerprints-Phantoms…
 
In Episode 130 of the Weird Tales Radio Show, author & editor John Linwood Grant tells us everything you ever wanted to know about Occult Detective Fiction plus we discuss our sometimes pointless psychic powers & echoes from the future. Links: Weird Tales Radio Show archive - https://www.urbanfantasist.com/weird-tales-radio-show http://www.greydogt…
 
In Episode 129 of the Weird Tales Radio Show we talk to author Daniel Duke about his great-great grandfather, the Old West outlaw Jesse James and the connection with the lost treasures of the Knights Templar. Links: Weird Tales Radio Show archive - https://www.urbanfantasist.com/weird-tales-radio-show https://authordanduke.com/ https://jessewjames.…
 
In 1892, a dreaded disease caused a President to navigate local health situation and created a new law. We look at the precedent-setting quarantine order of the 23rd President, Benjamin Harrison. While we are at it, we look at Harrison's presidency, policies, his influence on future events, his failed attempt to obtain fair elections for both Afric…
 
In Episode 128 of the Weird Tales Radio Show we continue our urban fantasy fiction theme by revisiting an earlier interview with G.S. Denning, the author of the Warlock Holmes novels plus Janie has been looking at the weird legend of the Vegetable Lamb of Tartary. Links: Weird Tales Radio Show archive - https://www.urbanfantasist.com/weird-tales-ra…
 
In Episode 127 of the Weird Tales Radio Show we hear from American author Morgan Daimler about the Fae - that’s the Faerie Folk and Irish folklore, including that most fearsome of goddesses: the Morrigan. We also look at the phenomenon of Death by Selfie (or Instagramicide) and how not to become Spiderman. Links: Weird Tales Radio Show archive - ht…
 
The Democratic Convention in New York City in 1980 was not the example to follow for how to run a convention. With the help of "Reaganland" author and historian Rick Perlstein, we look at one of the most frustrating modern conventions. The fight between Ted Kennedy and Carter for the nomination, obscure rules challenges, delegates cajoled by genera…
 
In Episode 126 of the Weird Tales Radio Show we hear from pop culture expert Arlen Schumer on why Sean Connery was always the best James Bond – and how nobody did it better after the first four Bond movies. Plus we have an interview with Ben Aaronovitch on his life as a Doctor Who scriptwriter and author of the best selling Rivers of London urban f…
 
In Episode 125 of the Weird Tales Radio Show we talk to science writer Kris Newby about her research into the weaponisation of deer ticks - have scientists crossed the boundary into Frankenstein territory? And Nick Redfern is back to tell us the perils of writing books about the Men in Black - and also how he first developed his interest in the wei…
 
In Episode 124 of the Weird Tales Radio Show we talk to UFO and the Weird investigator Nick Redfern about the Rendlesham Forest UFO Conspiracy & Other Tales. Naomi from Inanna’s in Norwich tells us some of the traditions associated with Lammas/Lughnasadh. We also discover more Military Madness from the archives: the American plan to fire-bomb Japan…
 
The convention that nominated then-unknown Jimmy Carter in 1976 convention was worth 30 percentage points in the polls, and is seen as one of the best organized events by many who study politics. We look at what happened - from a strict chairman's gavel to a secret VP pick, from expert badge distribution to garbage cleanup, Along with possibly bugg…
 
In Episode 123 of the Weird Tales Radio Show we talk to Pop Culture expert Arlen Schumer about The Twilight Zone series - the best sci-fi television ever? Plus Janie is back to talk about the Folklore of Vegetables, we have a spell to make your garden grow, and are our constellations in turmoil as we look at Ophiuchus: the 13th Sign of the Zodiac? …
 
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