show episodes
 
The drug war, covered by drug users as war correspondents. Crackdown is a monthly podcast about drugs, drug policy and the drug war led by drug user activists and supported by research. Each episode will tell the story of a community fighting for their lives. It’s also about solutions, justice for those we have lost, and saving lives.
 
Every episode, legal expert Andrew and comic relief Thomas will tackle a popular legal topic and give you all the tools you need to understand the issue and win every argument you have on Facebook, with your Uncle Frank, or wherever someone is wrong on the Internet. It's law. It's politics. It's fun. We don't tell you what to think, we just set up the Opening Arguments.
 
Experts shape our world. Sometimes for the better, sometimes for the worse. In every big story, you’ll find one; you’ll find a researcher, scientist, engineer, planner, policy wonk, data nerd, bureaucrat, regulator, intellectual, or pseudointellectual. Their ideas are often opaque, unrecognized, and difficult to understand. Some of them like it that way. On Cited, we reveal their hidden stories.
 
Radio From Hell is the longest running radio program in the Salt Lake City area, and has consistently been rated as one of the best programs in the area by media reviews and polls. The show has received praise from outside the Utah region; Rolling Stone cited KXRK as one of the top-five rock and roll radio stations in the U.S., and reported that Radio From Hell was one of the longest-running local radio programs in the U.S.
 
The Blue and Goldcast is a podcast from the University of British Columbia that explores the big issues in higher education. Each episode is hosted by UBC President Santa Ono and UBC Professor Margot Young. Each month, you'll hear leading scholars discussing their own work, and their perspectives on how universities are changing--from UBC, to campuses across North America.
 
Television news reporter Kaitlin McCulley left her job during a pandemic. Now what? Her goal: find a better way to share stories that matter. No BS. Look, it's no secret the TV news industry is broken and affecting how people treat each other. How can you find the facts? Join Kaitlin for an honest, unfiltered look at the media industry through personal stories and eye-opening interviews. New episodes each week.
 
We are the seekers of truth. We are the writers of fact. We are both sides of the story. We are the chroniclers of history. We are journalists, and this course teaches how to report, write and publish through every means at our disposal--from conventional paper to digital conversations. Join me as we learn to develop ideas into stories, and to see the news that surrounds us. Together we will learn to find and ask the right questions of sources, so that we get information readers need and wan ...
 
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show series
 
April 8, 2021 - Inaccurate, misleading and one-sided media coverage leading up to the implementation of the state's new bail laws in 2020 - and the ensuing weeks and months after they took effect - contributed to a negative reaction to the changes, according to a report from FWD.us. We discussed the findings with report co-author Laura Bennett, man…
 
April 12, 2021 - The state budget included a record investment in child care, as the result of federal stimulus dollars. So we talked to Dede Hill of the Schuyler Center and Jenn O'Connor of Prevent Child Abuse New York about how state lawmakers and Gov. Andrew Cuomo plan to spend the money and what this means for child care providers in the state.…
 
April 12, 2021 -New Yorkers looking to place a sports wager from the comfort of their home will likely have to wait until next year's Super Bowl, according to our guest Adam Candee, managing editor of Legal Sports Report. He explains what to expect with the state's new online sports gambling law, including how much tax revenue it could bring in and…
 
Dr. Charles Smith performed autopsies at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, ON. The cops kept turning to him with new corpses, and he kept claiming that these deaths were the result of foul play. He was thought of as a God in his field–few people were willing to question his work. That is until a 2008 inquiry, which found evidence of errors…
 
April 9, 2021 - As part of national child abuse prevention month, we're telling the story of Jacqueline Franchetti, founder of Kyra's Champions, a non-profit organization advocating for reforms designed to keep children safe. She started the movement after her two-year-old daughter was murdered by her father during a court-sanctioned, unsupervised …
 
Today's show has everything you want from an OA episode! We start with some follow-up on the Originalism episodes. Second is a fascinating mini dive into Graham v. Connor and why both the defense and the prosecution of the Derek Chauvin Trial are citing it. Finally, we squeeze in an amazing wildcard segment about Jordan Peterson being Red Skull in …
 
April 8, 2021 - Ever since it got up and running in 2016, New York's medical marijuana program has been dogged by access and affordability obstacles for patients. But with the adoption of legalized marijuana at the end of March, state Sen. Diane Savino, a Staten Island Democrat, says the medical program is poised for a comeback.…
 
April 7, 2021 - We're joined by Russell Weaver, an economic geographer and director of research for Cornell University's school of Industrial and Labor Relations, to break down the state of New York's economic recovery since the start of the pandemic. We discuss what sectors have bounced back, who has been left behind and what's next…
 
In this bonus episode, Gordon Katic speaks with Simon A. Cole, a professor of Criminology, Law and Society at University of California Irvine. He’s the author of “Suspect Identities: A History of Fingerprinting and Criminal Identification”. We do a deep dive into the social and political story of fingerprinting, and how it took more than a century …
 
April 6, 2021 - Millions of Americans are getting vaccinated every day for COVID-19, but what does it mean for a return to normalcy? Can we take off our masks? Is it safe to have friends over?We asked these questions, and many more, to Dr. Eli Rosenberg, a professor of epidemiology and biostatistics for the University at Albany and a member of the …
 
A recent episode of the Rationally Speaking Podcast featured Originalist Law professor William Baude arguing for why judges should be originalist. Needless to say, it was not a good case and strawman arguments abounded. Andrew is here to give us part 2 of the deep-dive that will set the record straight on why originalism is still bad.…
 
My guests this week are Nat Gyenes and Megan Marrelli with Meedan, a non-profit building digital tools for journalists, helping them fact check information quickly and turn it around for the public. When the Covid-19 pandemic hit last year, Nat – with her training in public health – and Megan – with her training in journalism – put together a digit…
 
Jon Campbell, the state editor for the USA Today Network in New York, joins the show to break down the potential legal headaches facing Gov. Andrew Cuomo for the writing and promoting of his pandemic memoir, which may have violated state ethics laws governing the use of public resources.By WCNY
 
April 5, 2021 - The adoption of legalized adult-use marijuana in New York includes a criminal justice component intended to begin reversing the war on drugs. Emma Goodman, of the Legal Aid Society of NYC, joins the program to explain what the new law means for expunging criminal records, releasing some New Yorkers from prison and much more.…
 
April 5, 2021 - At the end of March, the state legislature approved a measure that would prevent public and private utilities from shutting off services, including gas, water, electric, cable and internet. Senate Energy and Telecommunications Committee Chair Kevin Parker, a Brooklyn Democrat, who sponsored the bill, joins the show to explain why th…
 
Apr. 2, 2021 - You probably don’t need to be an expert to know when the road you are driving on is in need of repairs. On today’s program, we talked with Mike Elmendorf, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Associated General Contractors of New York State, and Fred Hiffa, Consultant for the Rebuild NY Now Coalition and former First Deputy C…
 
If you're looking for evidence that Joe Biden is ready and willing to play hardball and not give a shirt about Republican votes, his first batch of judicial nominees are a great example. Andrew breaks down for us why they signal that he isn't messing around! Before that, we discuss the 9th circuit decision Young v. Hawaii about open carry. Links: M…
 
Apr. 1, 2021 - In early March, the Governor signed legislation that curtailed the emergency powers he was given at the beginning of the pandemic. Now, the state legislature will have an expanded role in the state’s pandemic response by reviewing any new directives or those up for renewal. Sen. Gustavo Rivera (D-Bronx), chair of the Senate Health Co…
 
Mar. 31, 2021 - Across social media, users are posting pictures of their vaccine experience as they get their first or only shot. However, Asm. John McDonald (D-Cohoes) has been posting a different kind of picture because he’s the one giving the vaccination. We talked with the lawmaker about his efforts to vaccine New Yorkers in the Capital Region.…
 
Mar. 31, 2021 - The state’s Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance is facing a lawsuit over its computer programs that force New Yorkers to choose male or female as their gender identity when applying for assistance. Jules Donahue, a nonbinary New Yorker who is a plaintiff in the case, and Jose Abrigo, Director of LGBTQ/HIV Advocacy at Legal…
 
Mar. 31, 2021 - Moments before she went to the floor of the Assembly to debate the Marijuana Regulation and Taxation Act, Assembly Majority Leader Crystal Peoples-Stokes (D-Buffalo) stopped by to discuss the long road to passage of this marijuana legalization bill and what it will mean for communities of color across the state.…
 
When it comes to complex social problems, us sensible well-educated book-learnin’ types turn to the experts; we ‘believe science’ — unlike those snorting, hooting, semi-literate dunces. But over the next two weeks, we have two stories that will make you think twice about putting blind faith in experts. What if they don’t actually know what they’re …
 
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