Citizens Guide To The Supreme Court public
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Brett and Nazim are two attorneys who hate being attorneys. Each week, they discuss current Supreme Court cases with the intent to make the law more accessible to the average person, while ruminating on what makes the law both frustrating and interesting. This podcast is not legal advice and is for entertainment purposes only. If anything you hear leads you to believe you need legal advice, please contact an attorney immediately
 
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With an episode title like this, you know its a party. This week's grab-bag episode covers cases regarding bankruptcy law (City of Chicago v. Fulton), immigration law (Pereida v. Wilkson), and admin law (Yellen v. Collins), all while discussing nu metals favorite sons. Not only does the law start at (07:40), but we don't even hit the into until (02…
 
This week's episode previews the biggest case of next year's term, Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, in which the State of Mississippi has asked the newly-formed Supreme Court to overrule Roe v. Wade. Brett and Nazim discuss a bit of the background of Roe and consider possible outcomes of the Dobbs decision. Law starts at (09:40), and d…
 
This week's episode covers Americans for Prosperity Foundation v. Bonta, in which the Supreme Court struck down a law which required charitable organizations to disclose their major donors. Brett and Nazim discuss the ideological split on the Court and what it means to be "conservative" in this day and age. No time stamp because this all killer, no…
 
Take it!! This week's episode covers Cedar Point Nursery v. Hassid, in which the Supreme Court struck down a California law that allowed access to union organizers on private property. Brett and Nazim discuss the implications of the 6-3 ideological split, but also shellfish and roller coasters. Law starts at (07:30).…
 
This week's episode covers two Constitutional law cases, Lange v. California (how the hot pursuit exception applies to misdemeanors) and Mahanoy School District v. B.L. (holding that the First Amendment prevents school districts from disciplining out of school speech). From a big picture perspective, Brett and Nazim discuss what history teaches us …
 
This week's episode gets the big cases out of the way early, as the Court dropped California v. Texas (holding that ACA survives another challenge for lack of standing) and Fulton v. City of Philadelphia (holding a Philadelphia law restricting referrals to a Catholic adoption agency violates the Free Exercise Clause). Both cases are more than just …
 
Brett and Nazim return from vacation to see what we can learn about judges from the cases of Van Buren v. U.S. (deciding "access" under Computer Fraud and Abuse Act), Borden v. U.S. (deciding reckless mindset under ACCA), Sanchez v. Myorkas (deciding admission status for permanent residency, and Garland v. Dai (deciding whether the 9th Circuit can …
 
Get ready to learn, folks, because this episode discusses time, poison, wars and 160 million dollars worth of garbage in the context of Guam v. U.S.. Although its mostly a case about statutory interpretation; and it's core, its the case you didn't know you needed to know more about. The law is a moving target here, but there's less nonsense than yo…
 
This week's episode covers three recent decisions, CIC Services v. IRS (procedure for challenging IRS notice requirements), Caniglia v. Strom (community care-taking exception for the home) and Edwards v. Vannoy (retroactivity of unanimous verdicts). Law starts at (04:07) and an explanation for the episode title follows soon after.…
 
Listen, there's a lot going on here. As a general proposition, this week's episode asks Brett and Nazim to narrow down which classification of lawyers would be best to sit with at a wedding table. Amidst discussing other wedding and marriage-related topics, your boys somehow find time to discuss recent opinions Facebook v. Duguid, Jones v. Mississi…
 
This week's episode revisits the good old days of high school, specifically the case of Mahanoy School District v. BL, where the Supreme Court must decide whether a high school that suspended a student for making a vulgar Snapchat about school sports violates the First Amendment. The law kinda generally takes shape around (11:00) but stays pretty c…
 
That's right, Hulkamaniacs. This week's supersized episode covers this year's Wrestelmania while covering the past, present and future implications that Ford Motor Company v. Bandemere has on personal jurisdiction. A time stamp would be pointless, but there's a surprising amount of law that is certainly more than I originally intended.…
 
We're talking sequels and remakes this week, as the podcast covers Collins v. Mnuchin (how to destroy a real estate admin agency in one easy step) and Edwards v. Vannoy (whether a rule about unanimous jury verdicts applies retroactively), two cases that carry on the spirit of decisions from last term. In this analogy, Collins is Chris Pratt, Selia …
 
This week's episode covers the hard-hitting questions associated with CIC Services v. Internal Revenue Service and American tax law in general, including things like, does Nazim like horror movies? Would you rather kill or marry textual statutory interpretation? Is this case going to de-fang the IRS? Who is winning the NCAA bracket pool? (Law start…
 
This week's episode covers the case of Arizona Republican Party v. Democratic National Committee, which asks once again whether neutral-looking voting laws that discriminate based on race violate whatever is left of the Voting Rights Act. The law starts at (2:30), but there are two food tangents we hope you enjoy.…
 
This week's episode is all about SPORTS! Brett and Nazim qualify their knowledge about college sports (including whether Nazim knows who Tim Tebow is) and then much later cover NCAA v. Alston, which asks whether regulations on student athlete benefits are a violation of anti-trust regulations. There's no timestamp because honestly it would be too h…
 
First off, you're welcome for that amazing episode title. Second, this episode covers the case of Republic of Germany v. Phillip, which covers how the Supreme Court uses the Foreign Sovereign Immunity Act to resolve property theft in the 1940s. Depending on how you view the Supreme Court, the result will probably not surprise you. Law starts at (04…
 
You may think that Star Wars and the case of Van Buren v. U.S. have nothing in common; however, this episode strives to show how the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act should have had greater impact on Princess Leia and the Resistance at large. Brett and Nazim discuss how the Court should interpret the term access, but not before revealing their favorite…
 
This week's episode involves Nazim, a Big Computer Boy, explaining the case of Google v. Oracle to Brett, a complete Luddite. In addition to explaining fair use and its application to computer language, your boys also discuss Pokemon, Jurassic Park, Akira and Nintendo to keep things extra hip and cool. The law starts at (07:20) and we're happy to s…
 
Gather round, children, to hear the story of RFRA-MAS, as told by Brett and Nazim to a live google-hangout crowd. RFRA Claus and Burwell the Elf discuss the history of RFRA, it's current application in the case of Tanzin v. Tanzir, and then take audience questions. The podcast is taking a holiday break, but will return on January 24th, 2021. Merry …
 
This week's episode covers last week's news stories involving the Supreme Court, including the election, COVID-19, the death penalty, and the census. The law starts at (08:49), but you'd miss your invitation to the Citizen's Guide to the Supreme Court Holiday Party. EDIT: a correction on what Nazim said about the impact of masks can be found here.…
 
This week's episode discusses Texas v. Pennsylvania and Kelly v. Pennsylvania, the two recent failed attempts to reverse the election through the Supreme Court. The podcast welcomes a Supreme Court expert to help analyze the heart of this issue, and then Brett and Nazim discuss Roman Catholic Diocese v. Cuomo. Law starts basically from the beginnin…
 
This week's amazingly-titled episode discusses the case of Cedar Point Nursery v. Hassid, which asks whether a California law that grants labor organizers access to private property violates the Fifth Amendment. The law kinda starts at (11:00), but actually starts at (13:40), which is indicative of the legal focus in this episode.…
 
This week's episode covers the oral argument in California v. Texas, in which the Court once is asked to determine the Constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. Brett and Nazim start the law at (05:00), but get into the merits of the decision at (14:06). Then somewhere towards the end Nazim reviews obscure Midwestern cherry candy.…
 
This week's episode eschews any legal analysis about the election and instead covers the somehow less stressful conversation of whether children can be sentenced to life in prison without parole in Jones v. Mississippi. Brett's audio is lightly wonky around minute five, but it fixes pretty quickly. The law starts at (06:17) and the Supreme Court is…
 
The boys are back, folks. This week's episode discusses the many ridiculous Voter Suppression lawsuits that have popped up over the last few weeks and whether the State action in question is valid, or just looking to stop people from voting. The law starts at (12:45), but this episode's namesake begins at (07:10). Also, our apologies for the sound …
 
Good morning. This week, Brett is joined by Gabe Roth from Fix the Court, an organization aimed at Supreme Court reform. Brett and Gabe discuss term limits, the proper role of the Supreme Court in democracy and ethical obligations of the justices. Gabe can be reached at @FixtheCourt on twitter. The regular show will return next week.…
 
It's the end of the term, so Brett and Nazim are coming at you LIVE over ZOOM, covering topics like (1) judging predictions from last year, (2) picking story lines for next year, and (3) re-visiting the whole "cutting your sandwich" debate. The Citizen's Guide to the Supreme Court will return in October 2020.…
 
In this week's episode, Brett and Nazim answer questions which include; but are not limited to, the Constitutionality of State mask regulations, the cancelled bar exam, sad sports defeats, a Federal law on masks, whether ice cream is soup, Kavanaugh one-year report card, COVID employment law, and being a terrible banquet-hall employee.…
 
This week's episode covers two administrative law decisions that were not covered in previous podcast episodes, including Selia Law v. CFPB (separation of powers concerns cut the head, but not the body of the Consumer Financial Protection Board), and Little Sisters of the Poor v. PA (Presidential interpretation of ACA which limits contraceptives do…
 
This week's podcast covers three cases involving the government, including Colorado v. Baca (the faithless electors case), US Agency for International Development v. Alliance for Open Society International (the First Amendment to international corporations case), and Land of Lincoln Mutual Health Ins. v. United States (the government is a deadbeat …
 
This week's episode covers the case of Our Lady of Guadalupe School v. Morrisey-Berru, which immunizes church schools from employment discrimination claims under the First Amendment, and also the Nevada COVID law that limits church attendance. The sound is lightly wonky in the beginning, but it doesn't continue throughout the episode. Otherwise, th…
 
Today's unnervingly straight-laced episode covers the unnervingly chaotic decision in Espinoza v. Montana Dept of Revenue, wherein the Court takes turns yelling at each other about the Free Exercise Clause, the Establishment Clause, and Montana's apparently oppressive effort to help kids go to school. Law starts from the beginning.…
 
The World's Greatest Podcast covers bias this week, as the incredibly handsome Brett and the always insightful Nazim discuss how our preexisting beliefs can affect decisions on the 9th Amendment, the Presidency, and the recent decision in Trump v. Vance (Brett did not know Mazars existed, so that case is covered more briefly). Law starts at (02:45)…
 
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