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Ron Yurko and Kostas Pelechrinis host the 'Open Source Sports' podcast to serve as a public reading group for discussing the latest research in sports analytics. Each episode focuses on a single paper featuring authors as guests, with discussions about the statistical methodology, relevance and future directions of the research.
 
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Episode 318 I have heard from several friends how every day in the pandemic seems to run together. Sort of a Groundhog Day effect. In this week’s podcast, I dive into that notion of everything and every day being the same and how that can impact our approach to talking about our photography in a meaningful way. I also talk about the challenges of s…
 
Episode 317 This week’s podcast takes a look at the impacts of how we react to events and information. When you hear someone talk about your photography, do you focus on the negative, which in turn makes everything negative, or do you focus on the positive? In the podcast, I talk about how your approach to that feedback can make all the difference …
 
In Christianity, Good Friday commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. Today we're going to learn about the depiction of that event on screen as we saw in 2004's The Passion of The Christ. To help us learn more, we'll be joined by the Professor of New Testament and Archaeology at Covenant Theological Seminary, Dr. David Chapman. Want to learn m…
 
Billy Magnussen joins the Four Quadrant Podcast to discuss his new critically acclaimed HBO Max series Made For Love and his role in the new James Bond film No Time To Die and the Sopranos prequel The Many Saints of Newark.For the latest entertainment news and the best reviews visit www.ThePlaylist.net.Follow the Four Quadrant Podcast on Instagram …
 
Episode 316 If you ever take one of my classes or workshops, you will listen to me talk about reading the photograph. The idea of reading a photograph is just like reading a book. You have to slow down, take it in, process the work, and think about it. I first came across the idea of reading the photograph from a Minor White article in the Aperatur…
 
Oscar-winning directors Daniel Lindsay and T. J. Martin join the Four Quadrant Podcast to discuss their critically acclaimed new film Tina, a new look at the life of legendary music superstar Tina Turner.For the latest entertainment news and the best reviews visit www.ThePlaylist.net.Follow the Four Quadrant Podcast on Instagram at www.instagram.co…
 
Episode 315 This week’s podcast breaks out the dustpan and broom. It is spring cleaning week. It is important to keep yourself organized and with sufficient space to be creative. With that in mind, this week we take a look at three easy places to do some spring cleaning in your photography practice to make some room for both the new and old ideas y…
 
On this episode of Based on a True Story, we'll learn from the research consultant on The Highwaymen about the historical accuracy of the film. John Neal Phillips is a historian and author of Running With Bonnie and Clyde: The Fast Yen Years of Ralph Fults and editor of Blanche Barrow's memoir, My Life with Bonnie and Clyde. Did you enjoy this epis…
 
Episode 314 This week’s podcast is all about answering questions from podcast listeners. We tackle five questions that really got me thinking or were asked more than once. I hope you get something out of the answers and if you have any questions feel free to reach out and let me hear them. This week I chime in on: What do I think of new technology …
 
Episode 313 Sometimes when we are working, it is easy to stick with what we are good at. We tend to think that we are meant to be doing it if we are good at something. However, being good at something doesn’t mean that we enjoy something or should keep doing something. In this week’s podcast, we talk about how sometimes we need to give up what we a…
 
We're going back to 1977 and Ridley Scott's feature film directorial debut, The Duellists. The movie tells the tale of two soldiers in Napoleon's army who duel with each other for over a decade. Historian and professor at Louisiana State University, Alexander Mikaberidze, returns to help us separate fact from fiction in the movie. Want to learn mor…
 
Episode 312 This week’s podcast takes a look at why we create. I believe that art, and by proxy photography, is best when it is personal. It is born out of our curiosity and desire to discover, learn, grown, process, and sort out how we fit in the world. When we make work from a place of self–understanding, it taps into a common thread across lots …
 
Acclaimed actress Katherine Waterston joins the Four Quadrant Podcast to discuss her latest role in the period drama The World To Come and gives a tease about the third and upcoming Fantastic Beasts feature.For the latest entertainment news and the best reviews visit www.ThePlaylist.net.Follow the Four Quadrant Podcast on Instagram at www.instagram…
 
Episode 311 Each one of us has a different level of patience when it comes to time. I think each of us has to answer how long I am willing to wait to get a great photograph? Often, I find that I might give up a little early or stay way too late in my work. The balance of time always seems a little off. In this week’s podcast, we jump into the quest…
 
Released in 2020, Greyhound was written by Tom Hanks, who also starred in the lead role. The movie was based on a novel by C.S. Forester called The Good Shepherd. Today, we'll be joined by the Naval Consultant on the film, Gordon Laco, to discuss its historical accuracy. Want to learn more? Learn more about Gordon's work as a historical consultant …
 
Episode 310 For many photographers I work with, one of the consistent pieces of feedback I hear is that there is never enough of something to do the work they want. There might not be time or money or gear. A lot of effort and energy goes into thinking about what is needed to achieve our goals and what is missing. I like to imagine and brainstorm a…
 
Episode 309 When we think about approaching our photography, we often put things in buckets or bins. These classifications can help us identify areas of the images to work with and projects to pursue or find meaning in our work. Over time, I have grown to think about these ideas as more of a continuum or spectrum of ideas where they overlap and pus…
 
2010's The Conspirator tells the story of Mary Surratt and her alleged involvement in Lincoln's assassination. Dr. Brian Dirck joins us again to separate fact from fiction in the film. Dr. Dirck is a Professor of History at Anderson University and author of multiple books on President Lincoln, including Lincoln and the Constitution, The Black Heave…
 
I work with a lot of different people on different aspects of photography. One of the big areas that I help people with is developing a deeper connection to their work and others' work. In that process, one of the issues that comes up repeatedly is the idea of what makes a good photograph. On more than one occasion, I have found myself in the conve…
 
Throughout our lifetime, we have a lot of friends and acquaintances. Some people are around for a short time, and others might last that lifetime. I have been thinking a lot lately about friendships and how they shape and shift us. They provide support, honesty, humor, companionship, and so much more. As I started to think about photography, I wond…
 
I have been working on some images in the studio recently and some start of the new year cleanup work. As I bounced back and forth between those two projects, it occurred to me that I was missing one thing oftentimes. That thing could be a screw for a tripod leg or a lens cap or an emotional feeling in a print. But as I worked on the projects, I st…
 
Today we'll learn about the classic 1970 film Waterloo and its depiction of Napoleon's final defeat. Joining us to discuss the historical accuracy of Waterloo is historian and professor at Louisiana State University, Alexander Mikaberidze. Alexander has also written numerous books on the Napoleonic era, including his latest which is called The Napo…
 
This week's podcast is a chat about how we feel about photography and photographs. In my teaching experience, I have found that many people think a lot about their photographs, but in some ways how we feel about our photographs can matter more. The post How do you feel about photography? appeared first on Daniel j Gregory Photography.…
 
We discuss a previous Big Data Bowl finalist paper `Expected Hypothetical Completion Probability` (https://arxiv.org/abs/1910.12337) with authors Sameer Deshpande (@skdeshpande91) and Kathy Evans (@CausalKathy). Sameer is a postdoctoral associate at MIT. Prior to that, he completed his Ph.D. at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. …
 
This week's podcast is a quick chat about setting goals for the new year and the importance of looking back at the past year and celebrating what was good. In a year harder than most for people, 2020 gives us a chance to celebrate the flexibility and durability we all have to continue adapting and creating. The post The start of a new year and cele…
 
In the movie Donnie Brasco we see the story of an FBI agent who goes into deep cover infiltrating the New York mafia families. The truth is Donnie Brasco was the under cover name for Joe Pistone. He joins us today along with actor and Joe's co-host on the Deep Cover Podcast, Leo Rossi. Want to learn more about the real story? Listen to Joe and Leo'…
 
How much of 2014's The Alamo really happened? To help us separate fact from fiction in the movie, we’ll be chatting with professor, historian and author Stephen L. Hardin. Stephen was also a historical consultant on the movie we’ll be chatting about today, so we’ll get some extra insight into the production of the film as well. Want to learn more a…
 
This week's podcast is all about homework. One of the areas that I think all photographers could improve is understanding what makes a good photograph or a good photograph to them. We dive deep into that topic this week with an exercise to help you better understand how and why you react to photographs the way you do and apply that knowledge to fut…
 
We discuss Bang the Can Slowly: An Investigation into the 2017 Houston Astros with Ryan Elmore (@rtelmore) and Gregory J. Matthews (@StatsInTheWild). This paper was the winner of the Carnegie Mellon Sports Analytics Conference Reproducible Research Competition in October 2020. Ryan Elmore is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Business Info…
 
This week marks the 300th episode of the podcast. So first off, thank you to everyone who tunes in and listens to the podcast. It really means the world to me that you all tune in and check out what is going on with the podcast. As I mention about a third of the way into this week's show, this podcast is about all the experiences that I have about …
 
Wake Island was attacked on the same day as Pearl Harbor on December 7th, 1941 (December 8th on Wake Island across the International Date Line). A few months later, on August 11th, 1942, Paramount Pictures released the war propaganda film Wake Island. To help us separate fact from fiction in the movie, we’ll be chatting with Professor Gregory J. W.…
 
I have been asked a lot recently about what I think about some of the new tools digital photographers have at their disposal. Many programs now offer "AI or machine learning" to help edit photographs. Now with the click of a few buttons, you can replace skies, change expressions, or quickly composite images together. In today's podcast, we talk a l…
 
In the end, I think we all want to make interesting photographs, and the composition and framing are so much of that experience. The more you can be aware of composing, the more interesting and accurate stories you can tell. Being aware also gives you something else that is critical to photography--repeatability. You can repeat something repeatedly…
 
How historically accurate was 2012's Lincoln? To help us separate fact from fiction in the movie, we’ll be chatting with Dr. Brian Dirck, who is a Professor of History at Anderson University and author of multiple books on President Lincoln, including Lincoln and the Constitution, The Black Heavens: Abraham Lincoln and Death and Lincoln the Lawyer.…
 
In this week's podcast, we look at the impacts of muscle memory on our photography. Muscle memory, or the body's ability to do something without thinking about it, is an important aspect of working as a photographer. This memory allows us to be able to quickly and efficiently do our jobs. From settings on the camera to keyboard shortcuts in a progr…
 
In this week's podcast, we look at a possible photographic approach and discuss how you approach knowing when enough is enough when creating the image. For many of us, our approach to getting an image completed is incremental. We take small steps in our approach to framing, editing, shooting, and printing. While this method works, I propose that by…
 
1989's Glory is currently the most requested movie to cover. Gregory J. W. Urwin is an author, military historian and Professor at Temple University. He'll join us today to separate fact from fiction in Glory. Want to learn more about the real story? Here are some resources to get you started: A Brave Black Regiment by Louis F. Emilio with an intro…
 
After reading a brief snippet about how Forbes creates its top 200 most brand valuable companies, I got to thinking about what formulas do we use in our photography when we assign a photograph a star value of 1-5. This week's podcast looks at how we approach and think about our rating systems for our images. The post How do you value your images? I…
 
We discuss 'How often does the best team win? A unified approach to understanding randomness in North American sport' with Michael Lopez. Michael Lopez (@StatsbyLopez) is the Director of Football Data and Analytics at the National Football League and a Lecturer of Statistics and Research Associate at Skidmore College. At the National Football Leagu…
 
Everything is connected. When you photograph a leaf, it is part of a tree. A leading line doesn't just start and stop in your frame. It extends beyond the frame. In this week's podcast, we look at how our approach to seeing the whole and its parts can impact how we view the world and the images we make. Small shifts in our awareness of how everythi…
 
Back on episode #152 of Based on a True Story, we covered season 1 of the History Channel's Project Blue Book. Today, Rob Kristoffersen comes back on the podcast to talk about the events we saw in season 2. Did you enjoy this episode? You can find the transcript and show notes for this episode at: https://www.basedonatruestorypodcast.com/168/ Suppo…
 
I had a conversation with a friend a while back about photography and at one point, relating to photo editing, I asked him, Why do you care what someone else does so much? There was a long, almost uncomfortably long pause. The answer that he gave didn't really matter much to me, but that pause really got me thinking about the idea of why do we care…
 
When I was younger, I worked for a high-tech startup that had to lay most of the company off in order to survive. They didn't do anything but prolong their demise, but the language used during the layoffs has stuck with me. I hadn't thought about it in a long time but recently heard someone say it when talking about photographs. The phrase used whe…
 
Dr. Clayborne Carson is the Martin Luther King, Jr., Centennial Professor of History at Stanford University and the founding director of the Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute at Stanford. He joins us today to compare history with the 2014 movie Selma. Want to learn more? World House Podcast: https://kinginstitute.stanford.ed…
 
Sometimes when we look at a photograph, we just don't get it. We move on and don't give it another thought. However, assuming the photographer was attempting to make something meaningful with there work, the photograph does have something to say. I have grown to think that it is our job to try and understand our reactions to photographs so that we …
 
In a follow-up to last week's podcast on the value of interviewing others and yourself about photography, this week we talk about some possible subjects or ideas to consider when planning your interview. I always recommend that you start with the work. Look closely at the images and projects someone has created to get focused. Think about what you …
 
Chris Wimmer is the host and producer of the extremely popular Legends of the Old West and Infamous America podcasts. He joins us today to compare history with the 2007 movie The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford. Want to learn more about Jesse James? Listen to an entire season of Legends of the Old West that dives deep into Je…
 
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