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For the Love of Science

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For the Love of Science

The Bay Area Environmental Research Institute

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Welcome to For the Love of Science, a podcast from The Bay Area Environmental Research Institute. In this show, we hear directly from the institute's scientists, engineers, and mission specialists about the groundbreaking research they’re doing right now in earth, environmental, and space sciences, and learn about what their work can teach us about our Earth and our universe.
 
Environmental Studies and Sciences is a podcast covering some of the latest research on environmental issues and hot topics in the environmental field, with leading academics and upcoming environmental researchers. The podcast is produced by Speak Up for Blue Productions on behalf of the Association for Environmental Studies and Sciences, and the Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences. The host is Dr. Chris Parsons.
 
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GEO Podcast

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GEO Podcast

Gary Lewis, GEOetc.com

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A place to learn about geology for teachers, students, rock hounds, and geology enthusiasts. Gary Lewis is an Australian-born geologist who loves to share his passion for all things 'geology'. In the GEO podcast, Gary takes you on a journey to learn about rocks, minerals, earthquakes, volcanoes, glaciers and so much more. It does not matter if you have no experience in geology, Gary will help you to understand the fundamentals of our planet so you can have a greater understanding about when ...
 
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show series
 
In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic there was a lot of confusion, as we all tried to figure out what we should and shouldn't do to best protect ourselves and others. Fortunately, we now have more definitive answers to some of our most pressing questions - which are backed-up by data - including "umm...should I be wearing a mask?". As COVID c…
 
Satellites have been orbiting our planet for the past few decades. We might be familiar with how they can be used to track weather, or beam television and phone signals around the world. But did you know, that by capturing images of the Earth outside the visible spectrum, they're able to offer a unique perspective of the ground beneath our feet? Th…
 
From California to Greece to Australia, it seems like every time we switch on the news there's another wildfire report. Some fires are natural - in fact, they're a fundamental part of many ecosystems - but the severity and frequency of the wildfires we are now witnessing is beyond natural levels. Human-ignited "megafires" are causing devastation ac…
 
Chocolate. It’s rare to find anyone who isn’t partial to a square or two of this delicious treat. But is its very existence in danger? (*Cue worried faces.*) In this episode of the Big Questions Podcast we chat to chocoholic and researcher Acheampong Atta-Boateng, who studies the relationship between cocoa trees and their micro-pollinators. We hear…
 
This two-part series is all about exoplanets, planets outside of our solar system, and how they and the stars they orbit are a key part of the search for extraterrestrial life. In this episode, Part 2, we talk with two more BAERI folks, astronomer Geert Barentsen and science communicator Kassie Perlongo, about their citizen science accelerator, Pla…
 
This two-part series is all about exoplanets, planets outside of our solar system, and how they and the stars they orbit are a key part of the search for extraterrestrial life. In this episode, Part 1, we talk with two BAERI researchers, Christina Hedges and Ann Marie Cody, also a PI at the SETI Institute. We’ll hear about their work on exoplanets,…
 
In this episode we speak with two team members of NASA’s Earth Science Project Office (ESPO), and learn about the essential, behind the scenes work they’re doing to help scientists get out into the field and collect the data they need to better understand our planet. Guests: Sommer Nicholas, Deputy Project Manager, ESPO Katie Stern, Deputy Project …
 
Nowadays, the idea of encountering robots in our daily lives isn't pure science fiction. Many of us interact with AI every day, and the use of robots in, for example, healthcare settings, is already on the horizon. But what if something goes wrong? The RoboTIPS team at the University of Oxford is developing an innovative feature - an 'ethical black…
 
Do you remember when the price of fizzy drinks in the UK went up slightly a few years ago? Soda fans, perhaps you remember all too clearly...! Well, this was because the UK government introduced a sugar tax (or the Soft Drinks Industrial Levy, to be precise), requiring manufacturers to pay a tax on sugary drinks - a cost which was then passed on to…
 
An arboretum could be described as a "living library". A beautifully curated collection of woody plants from across the globe, each one carefully labelled and managed. In this episode of the Big Questions Podcast we chat to Ben Jones, Arboretum Curator at the University of Oxford Botanic Garden and Harcourt Arboretum, about what makes an arboretum …
 
Dr. Emily Schaller talks about running SARP, a unique NASA internship that gives undergraduate students hands-on experience in atmospheric science research. Learn more at baeri.org/sarp Listen to SARP alumna Katie Dong's interview with Oregon State University.By Bay Area Environmental Research Institute
 
Lockdowns, social distancing, restrictions on 'normal' activities - we've all been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. But how has it impacted on our mood and mental wellbeing? We chat to Dr Maxime Taquet from the Department of Psychiatry about 'mood homeostasis' (the interplay between people's activities and the way they feel), and how this has bee…
 
Their distinctive 'teacher teacher' call is synonymous with British gardens, but great tits are facing a big problem - climate change. As our springtime becomes warmer and begins earlier, peak caterpillar abundance is also shifting earlier. As a crucial food source for great tit chicks, this is cause for concern. In this episode of the Big Question…
 
Remember those days when it was possible to climb aboard a plane and jet off around the world? Well, while we might be yearning for foreign shores, there's no denying that air travel comes with a big ol' carbon footprint. But is it possible to make aeroplanes 'greener'? We chat to Dr Chiara Falsetti, a researcher at the Oxford Thermofluids Institut…
 
The moon may be the closest planetary body to us, but we still have a lot to learn about it. For example, what is the water-cycle like on an airless body such as the moon? How much water can be found there, and could we one day utilise this water for space exploration? In this episode of the Big Questions Podcast, we chat to Dr Katherine Shirley, a…
 
We're over a year into the coronavirus pandemic, and it's affected our lives in many ways - including, for many of us, how we sleep. You may have experienced changes to your sleep pattern (particularly if you waved goodbye to your commute last March), your quality of sleep, or even had some very weird or vivid dreams! If so, you're not alone. Join …
 
If you've ever been lucky enough to hear a lion roar (whether that's at the zoo or in the wild - hopefully at a safe distance!), you'll know that it's a truly bone-shaking experience. But do lions have a unique roar, or do they all sound the same? How could knowing this help with conservation efforts? Join us for this episode of the Big Questions p…
 
Reducing the risk to people of volcanic eruptions is an important job for geoscientists. In this episode, we talk about four tools geoscientists can use including earthquakes, deformation, gases, and well water temperatures. This would make a great introduction to students before having them do the Thunder Island volcano simulation activity. Intere…
 
Remote sensing is a powerful tool - it can be used to map the topography of the ocean floor, track the ash plume of an erupting volcano, or understand drought patterns on tribal lands. As the technology becomes easier for tribal land managers to use, the biggest challenge isn’t navigating the data - it’s navigating the human relationships and conve…
 
Rivers are so important as they provide water for drinking and agriculture. They are also important as they move mountains (over time) to the ocean! In this episode, we talk about the basic morphology of rivers - bedrock and alluvial rivers as well as the concepts of young, mature, and old rivers. It is a very basic introduction to ways of looking …
 
In this year's Valentine's episode, we're exploring one of the most special relationships around. That's right - the one between us and our dogs! We often hear pooches described as "(wo)man's best friend", but for how long has this been the case? Join Prof Greger Larson, an expert in palaeogenomics and bio-archaeology, as we journey back thousands …
 
The formation of Banded Iron Formations (BIFs) are so important as a resource of the element iron, but also as they tell us about how our atmosphere evolved some 2,500 million years ago. In this episode, we talk about the major theory of the formation of BIFs as well as some alternative theories, and what BIF's can tell us about how the evolution o…
 
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