show episodes
 
The news of the week in audio, for many years compiled and written by the late Michelle Hilling of Archaeologica, is now the product of our dedicated volunteer team. Read by Laura Pettigrew, the Audio News is compiled from Archaeologica’s daily news updates. The musical interludes are original compositions by Anthony Pettigrew. The Audio News from Archaeologica is compiled from Archaeologica.org's daily news updates.
 
best, c. is a new podcast project from Concordia's Ethnography Lab promoting graduate student research. Host/Producer: John Bryans Creative Producer: Anne-Marie Turcotte Sound Producer: Kris Millett Production Assistants: Adam van Sertima, Pauline Hoebanx, Juan Pablo Neri, John Deidouss
 
Everywhere around us are echoes of the past. Those echoes define the boundaries of states and countries, how we pray and how we fight. They determine what money we spend and how we earn it at work, what language we speak and how we raise our children. From Wondery, host Patrick Wyman, PhD (“Fall Of Rome”) helps us understand our world and how it got to be the way it is.
 
If you want to understand how social scientists’ study human behaviour, how industry innovates or want to know more about how they can successfully work together and enhance each other, then you have come to the right place! Join our hosts as they engage with anthropologists, other researchers and industry specialists from all over the world. The discussions will be about their specific work in understanding people and how they apply that understanding to advance industry, scholarship and/or ...
 
This is experience by design, a podcast that brings new perspectives to the experiences we have everyday. Does standing in line always have to suck? Why are airports so uncomfortable? What does it mean to be loyal to a brand? Why do you love being connected but dislike feeling tethered to your smart phone? Can we train people to care about the climate? Join Sociologist Gary David and Anthropologist Adam Gamwell on an expedition to the frontiers of culture and business through the lens of hum ...
 
The Ethnography Atelier podcast discusses research methods with accomplished qualitative researchers. We talk to guests about their experiences of conducting research in and around organizations, the challenges they faced and the understandings they gained. The podcast is an initiative of the Ethnography Atelier at emlyon business school which promotes ethnographic and other qualitative research. For more information please visit our website at www.ethnographyatelier.org
 
Life is complicated, but we love simple answers. AI and robotics are changing the nature of work. Emojis change the way we write. Fossil Fuels were once the engine of progress, now we're in a race to change how we power the planet. We're constantly trying to save ourselves...from ourselves. Join Anthropologist and culture expert Dr. Adam Gamwell for curated conversations with humanity’s top makers and minds on our creative potential through design, culture, business and technology. Change yo ...
 
My name is Katherine Routledge. In 1914, I sailed from England to Easter Island, in the distant South Pacific, famous for its huge, stone statues. This is the story of a journey, and it is the story of a place. One that feels as near to me now as ever, even though I could hardly be farther away. This is The Mystery of Easter Island. Audio drama from Footsteps Media LLC.
 
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Service Lab

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Service Lab

Service Lab London

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Service Lab is a podcast featuring talks given by leading service designers on their work and experiences. Our speakers include people like the Head of Service Design at GDS or Head of Product at UsTwo. And our talks range from case studies on online services to masterclasses on ethnography.
 
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Full Worlds

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Full Worlds

Hampus Jakobsson

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When you write a novel or build a game, you have to design a whole world. A world with culture, hierarchy, taboos, economy, fairness, traditions, careers, and origin stories. In Full Worlds, we hear authors and creators explain the worlds they built, without the story getting in the way.
 
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#zimlove

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#zimlove

A Podcast about Zimbabwe. By Roma.

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#zimlove is a podcast where I, a foreigner who has been living and working in Zimbabwe for a couple years, tries to explain through the eyes of others, why I fell in love with this country. When I try to describe the beauty and diversity of this place, I fail because I cannot compete with hyperinflation and expensive safaris, which is the only thing that google spits out once you type in "Zimbabwe". In this podcast each person describes one true perspective on Zimbabwe from their own reality ...
 
The Mindful Cranks broadly explores the cultural translation of Buddhism in the West, various facets of Buddhist modernism, and the mainstreaming of mindfulness in secular contexts. The podcast serves as a forum for voices that go beyond the dominant narratives which have been thus far uncritical of consumerism, medicalization, psychologization, corporatization and self-help approaches. Drawing from a wide range of disciplines — the humanities, philosophy, cultural studies, education, critic ...
 
Anthropological Airwaves is the official podcast of American Anthropologist, the flagship journal of the American Anthropological Association. It is a venue for highlighting the polyphony of voices across the discipline’s four fields and the infinite—and often overlapping—subfields within them. Through conversations, experiments in sonic ethnography, ethnographic journalism, and other (primarily but not exclusively) aural formats, Anthropological Airwaves endeavors to explore the conceptual, ...
 
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Research, Action & Art

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Research, Action & Art

Ethnographie vor der Haustür und in der Welt, Universität zu Köln

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Raus aus dem wissenschaftlichen Elfenbeinturm und rein ins Ohr - das ist das Ziel des Lehrforschungsprogramms „Ethnografie vor der Haustür und in der Welt“ 2015/2016 unter dem Titel „Research, Action and Art“. Forschungs-, Kunst- und Integrationsprojekte aus Köln und der Welt treffen auf ethnologische Forschungsmethoden. Die teilnehmenden Studierenden stellen ihre Forschungsprojekte in diesem Podcast vor. In den Forschungen geht es um unterschiedliche Themenkomplexe wie Multikulturalismus, M ...
 
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AnthroPod

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AnthroPod

Society for Cultural Anthropology

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AnthroPod is produced by the Society for Cultural Anthropology (http://www.culanth.org). Each episode, we explore what anthropologists and anthropology can teach us about the world and people around us.
 
Question Authority helps DTC brands and marketers absorb best practices (or break bad habits) in the art & science of questions... be it zero-party data, the qualitative layer, ethnography, surveys, behavioral science, or other types of market research. Powered by EnquireLabs, Shopify's leading platform for surveys and question streams.
 
The Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies at the University of Washington promotes in-depth interdisciplinary study of all major post-communist subregions - Eastern and Central Europe, the Baltic region, the Caucasus and Central Asia, and Russia - in order to understand the legacies of the imperial and communist past as well as to analyze the emerging institutions and identities that will shape Eurasia's future. We share audio of interesting and relevant events ...
 
The Vasari Research Centre for Art and Technology is based at Birkbeck, University of London. It supports research projects, hosts related events, and has a range of unique connections to other media research institutions, large and small museums and galleries, and the creative industries. For more information: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/vasari/about/
 
Why is Sociology Important? What have been the key trends in social sciences? Sociology is the academic study of social behavior, including its origins, development, organization, and institutions. Social science uses various methods of empirical investigation and critical analysis to develop a body of knowledge about social order; social disorder and social change but is this method of exploring our world still relevant today? In this series of interviews Thinking Allowed presenter and soci ...
 
If you're tired of hearing slogans like "Innovate or Die" or the story about how Kodak went out of business, then you've come to the right place. Our goal is to give you just what you need to go out and build amazing things. AND we have a school for that. One that's open, practical, and free. We stalk some of the most interesting people in the world and convince them to teach what they know about building new ventures, navigating change, and (obviously) being an interesting person. So, we'll ...
 
We believe Mission and Margin is the business of healthcare. Business of Healthcare (BOH) interviews feature innovations sustainably improving healthcare Mission & Margin. Each discussion includes a healthcare executive and innovator concentrating on the same problem. Think “Nightline” or “How I Built This” just for healthcare. Recent guests have included Bernadette Spong, Chief Financial Officer, Orlando Health, Paul Kusserow, President & CEO, Amedisys, Blake Marggraff, Founder & Chief Exec ...
 
The University of Washington's Center for West European Studies is a Jean Monnet Center of Excellence. Founded over 25 years ago in the 1990s, the center has developed a well-earned reputation for implementing innovative teaching, outreach, and research programs in the study of Europe, the EU and and EU-US relations. The center's activities are co-funded by the Erasmus+ program of the European Union.
 
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Down to a Science, the CASTAC Podcast

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Down to a Science, the CASTAC Podcast

CASTAC (The Committee for the Anthropology of Science, Technology & Computing)

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Platypus, the CASTAC Blog, presents "Down to a Science" a podcast that examines the world of science from social and historical perspectives. How does science work and does it have to work that way? Season 1 will discuss the economization of life, numbers and objectivity, and studying data science ethnographically. --- CASTAC’s mission is to facilitate communication within the AAA among anthropologists working in areas related to science, technology and computing, and to promote the visibili ...
 
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show series
 
What can years of ethnographic engagement with rural Indonesia teach us about capitalism, development, and resistance? On this episode of Ethnographic Marginalia, our guest is Dr. Tania Li, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto. Tania tells us about three decades of research on development programs, local activism, and class format…
 
From mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue to chronic bacterial infections such as yaws, Southeast Asia is home to a wide range of tropical diseases. For a long time, the arrival in the region of these and other dangerous tropical diseases was believed to be connected to the introduction of agriculture. But how long have these diseases…
 
Today I talked to Helga Nowotny about her new book In AI We Trust: Power, Illusion and Control of Predictive Algorithms (Polity, 2021). One of the most persistent concerns about the future is whether it will be dominated by the predictive algorithms of AI - and, if so, what this will mean for our behaviour, for our institutions and for what it mean…
 
China’s written history goes back more than 3,000 years, stretching deep into the Bronze Age. But just how far back does it go, and how reliable are those first legendary texts when discussing a world that had already been lost for centuries? They speak of powerful kings and capital cities, and a dynasty called the Xia, but can we find them in the …
 
The Salton Sea is a kaleidoscope. To some people, it's a waste land, a place of death only suitable for a dumping ground. For others, it's a clarion call, a warning for what humanity faces in our anthropogenically climate changed future. For still others, it's simply home. In The Settler Sea: California's Salton Sea and the Consequences of Colonial…
 
Up to Heaven and Down to Hell (Princeton UP, 2021) is a vivid and sometimes heartbreaking account of what happens when one of the most momentous decisions about the well-being of our communities and our planet--whether or not to extract shale gas and oil from the very land beneath our feet--is largely a private choice that millions of ordinary peop…
 
It's a common truism that history is often written by the victors, but it is equally true that the actual story is more complicated. One of the most poignant examples of this is the "discovery" of the new world by Christopher Columbus. So today I am super excited to have author Andrew Rowen back on the podcast. Andrew caught our attention back in 2…
 
On today’s podcast Jessica interviews Dr. Joe Stahlman (Tuscarora descent), Director of Seneca Nation’s Seneca-Iroquois National Museum-Onöhsagwë:de' Culture Center and Seneca Nation’s Tribal Historic Preservation Office. Joe takes us through his career journey, including what it’s like to direct both a museum and a THPO office. Along the way we di…
 
Societies all over the world are getting older, the result of the fact that we are living longer and having fewer children. At some point in the near future, much of the developed world will have at least twenty percent of their national populations over the age of sixty-five. Bradley Schurman calls this the Super Age. Today, Italy, Japan, and Germ…
 
Societies all over the world are getting older, the result of the fact that we are living longer and having fewer children. At some point in the near future, much of the developed world will have at least twenty percent of their national populations over the age of sixty-five. Bradley Schurman calls this the Super Age. Today, Italy, Japan, and Germ…
 
Eric Garza is the founder and primary instructor at Quillwood Academy, an online institution of higher learning dedicated to helping people throughout the English-speaking world learn to navigate the changing world in which we all live. His background is diverse, spanning ecology and evolution, environmental science and policy, ecological economics…
 
It can be easy to forget that experience design, whatever the kind, is about people. More than that, it is about making not only experiences better, but more importantly their lives better. As experience designers, we can help in ways great and small. It can be an overused phrase to be customer, or patient, or user centric. And we can lose sight wh…
 
News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Study of volcanic ash provides new date for one of world’s earliest Homo sapiens skulls (details) Rare leather scale armor found in ancient Chinese tomb (details) Study indicates that Medieval warhorses were unexpectedly small in stature (details) Study of rare African script offers insight to early evolu…
 
Bijal Shah shares story of the meteoric rise of Guild Education, the Denver-based ed tech firm that has quickly emerged as the leading marketplace for corporate education. True to its B-Corporation status, Guild focuses on building shared success for its corporate partners, adult learners and education and training providers. As a new start-up, Gui…
 
Mainland Southeast Asia is one of the most fascinating and complex cultural and linguistic areas in the world. This book provides a rich and comprehensive survey of the history and core systems and subsystems of the languages of this fascinating region. Drawing on his depth of expertise in mainland Southeast Asia, Enfield includes more than a thous…
 
What can years of ethnographic engagement with rural Indonesia teach us about capitalism, development, and resistance? On this episode of Ethnographic Marginalia, our guest is Dr. Tania Li, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto. Tania tells us about three decades of research on development programs, local activism, and class format…
 
What can years of ethnographic engagement with rural Indonesia teach us about capitalism, development, and resistance? On this episode of Ethnographic Marginalia, our guest is Dr. Tania Li, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto. Tania tells us about three decades of research on development programs, local activism, and class format…
 
Today I talked to Colleen Ammerman about her new book (co-authored with Boris Groysberg) Glass Half Broken: Shattering the Barriers That Still Hold Women Back at Work (HBR Press, 2021). The statistics are annoying, exasperating: choose your adjective. The proportion of female CEOs struggles to break 10%. On Fortune 500 boards, only about 0% of the …
 
Heroic science. Chaotic politics. Billionaire entrepreneurs. Award-winning journalist Brendan Borrell brings the defining story of our times alive through compulsively readable, first-time reporting on the players leading the fight against a vicious virus. The First Shots: The Epic Rivalries and Heroic Science Behind the Race to the Coronavirus Vac…
 
How did Latin splinter into the Romance languages? In this episode, we explore how Latin transformed from a single, widely dispersed language into a series - French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, and so on - of related but no longer mutually intelligible tongues. Patrick's book is now available! Get The Verge: Reformation, Renaissance, an…
 
Tracing the dramatic conflicts both inside organized medicine and between the medical profession and the larger society over quality, equality, and economy in health care, Peter A. Swenson illuminates the history of American medical politics from the late nineteenth century to the present. Disorder: A History of Reform, Reaction, and Money in Ameri…
 
During World War I, the British Empire enlisted half a million young men, predominantly from the countryside of Egypt, in the Egyptian Labor Corps (ELC) and put them to work handling military logistics in Europe and the Middle East. British authorities reneged on their promise not to draw Egyptians into the war, and, as Kyle Anderson shows, the ELC…
 
Ideamarket allows you to invest cryptocurrency into ideas and solving the information problem we all face: How do you know who to trust and what to pay attention to? In this episode, Mike Elias and James Ellis from Ideamarket break down the future of trust online. Topics Discussed In This Episode: [01:22] What is the two-sentence elevator pitch for…
 
How can we make creative industries fair and inclusive? In Reimagining the Creative Industries: Youth Creative Work, Communities of Care (Routledge, 2021), Miranda Campbell, an associate professor in the School of Creative Industries at Ryerson University, explores this question theoretically and empirically to present a new vision for both young c…
 
Another bonus episode! A conversation with composer Matthew Aucoin, whose opera Euridice had a run at the Met last month, and who just wrote a new book about the history and culture of opera, The Impossible Art: Adventures in Opera. More over at soundexpertise.org! Questions? Thoughts? Share them with Will on Twitter @seatedovation…
 
News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Carving of royal falconer found in Oslo excavations (details) New dating shows so-called “Viking” horned helmets are actually from the Bronze Age (details) Palace toilet from Iron Age Jerusalem shows even elites had worms (details) List of Maya food plants suggests resilience to drought was higher than be…
 
This is part 1 of a two-part episode. In this part, we're talking to media practitioner and artist-researcher Prakash Krishnan from Do The Kids Know? about his podcast as well as the ways we can use our positions in academia to advance our activism.Contributors: Dean's Office, "Best, Concordia" Podcast, and the Ethnography Lab at Concordia.Prakash …
 
Does ‘citizenship’ exist in a socialist or communist context? If it does, what would this mean in the case of Vietnam? To what extent do the Vietnamese state and Vietnamese citizens perceive citizenship differently? And how are those differences negotiated? Why does the wave of recent popular protests in neighbouring countries concern the Vietnames…
 
In Nature′s Evil: A Cultural History of Natural Resources (Polity Press, 2021), Alexander Etkind views the history of humankind through the prism of natural resources – how we acquire them, use them, value them, trade them, exploit them. History needs a cast of characters, and in this story the leading actors are peat and hemp, grain and iron, fur …
 
This collection of articles, edited by Matthew Romaniello, Alison Smith, Tricia Starks, takes up the history of material culture over the past several centuries of Russian history. Widely diverse objects such as maps, textiles, building materials, cigarette cases,fish guts (yes...), samovars, samizdat, and even the T-34 tank are viewed in light of …
 
In Nature′s Evil: A Cultural History of Natural Resources (Polity Press, 2021), Alexander Etkind views the history of humankind through the prism of natural resources – how we acquire them, use them, value them, trade them, exploit them. History needs a cast of characters, and in this story the leading actors are peat and hemp, grain and iron, fur …
 
In 2021, a team of divers led by renowned maritime archaeologist Dr Michael Flecker and sponsored by the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute surveyed two historic shipwrecks discovered in the Singapore Strait, working for several months to bring their submerged cargos to the surface. Chinese trade ceramics found in these cargos date their demise to the fou…
 
China’s late Neolithic period saw the emergence of increasingly powerful groups of elites who buried themselves in lavishly decorated tombs and built palaces and public buildings at the hearts of their fortified settlements. From these political centers, the elites built and ruled a patchwork of small, competing states. But by around 2000 BC, all o…
 
Quyền Văn Minh (b. 1954) is not only a jazz saxophonist and lecturer at the prestigious Vietnam National Academy of Music, but he is also one of the most preeminent jazz musicians in Vietnam. Considered a pioneer in the country, Minh is often publicly recognized as the “godfather of Vietnamese jazz.” Playing Jazz in Socialist Vietnam: Quyền Văn Min…
 
News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Ancient human DNA extracted from lice glue exhibits prehistoric migration patterns of Argentina’s early Ansilta culture (details) Jin Dynasty tomb from northern China holds murals depicting good luck symbols (details) 3D CT scan allows for virtual unwrapping of the mummy of Amenhotep the First (details) N…
 
Why did leading historians in both Indonesia and the Philippines become involved in projects to write national histories during the 1970s? How far were these projects essentially political undertakings to legitimate the Suharto and Marcos regimes respectively? In conversation with Duncan McCargo, Rommel Curaming discusses how he managed to intervie…
 
Aro Velmet's Pasteur's Empire: Bacteriology in France, Its Colonies, and the World (Oxford UP, 2020) is a complex history of the Pasteur Institutes, a network of scientific laboratories established in France and throughout the French empire, beginning in the last decade of the nineteenth century. The book examines the crucial roles Pastorians and P…
 
Today I talked to Nathalie Nahai new book Values, Uncertainty and the Psychology of Brand Resilience (Kogan Page, 2022) David Brooks once joked that in the end the “revolution” promised us by the Baby Boomers amounted to nothing much more than the founding of Whole Foods. What will Millennials bring us? Already it seems that the answer is a workfor…
 
In Empires of Vice: The Rise of Opium Prohibition across Southeast Asia (Princeton University Press, 2020) Diana Kim situates the regulation of vice at the heart of colonial state building. Through a layered comparison of opium prohibition in Burma, Malaya and Vietnam she shows how petty bureaucrats told stories to one another about opium that incr…
 
States have defined China from the very beginning of its recorded history more than 3,000 years ago, but how did they come into being? Professor Li Liu of Stanford University is one of the world’s leading experts on the prehistoric archaeology of China, and she returns to Tides for the second time to tell us about states, elites, and why they’re so…
 
Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found them…
 
Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found them…
 
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