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Best Ethnography podcasts we could find (updated August 2020)
Best Ethnography podcasts we could find
Updated August 2020
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The Ethnography Atelier podcast discusses research methods with accomplished qualitative researchers. We talk to guests about their experiences of conducting research in and around organizations, the challenges they faced and the understandings they gained. The podcast is an initiative of the Ethnography Atelier at emlyon business school which promotes ethnographic and other qualitative research. For more information please visit our website at www.ethnographyatelier.org
 
True. Smart. Fearless. Independent Study brings you thoughtful — and thought-provoking — audio stories from Charlottesville, Va. With an ethnographic eye and documentary voice, we make experimental radio in a learning lab led by a University of Virginia anthropologist. Join host Sarah Alberstein and staff as we explore all kinds of social issues and subcultures at UVa and beyond. Independent Study is distributed by Teej.FM, WTJU's podcast network.
 
Life is complicated, but we love simple answers. AI and robotics are changing the nature of work. Emojis change the way we write. Fossil Fuels were once the engine of progress, now we're in a race to change how we power the planet. We're constantly trying to save ourselves...from ourselves. This Anthro Life brings you smart conversations with humanity’s top makers and minds to make sense of it all. We dig into truth and hope in our creative potential through design, culture, and technology. ...
 
When you write a novel or build a game, you have to design a whole world. A world with culture, hierarchy, taboos, economy, fairness, traditions, careers, and origin stories. In Full Worlds, we hear authors and creators explain the worlds they built, without the story getting in the way.
 
The Familiar Strange is a podcast about doing anthropology: that is, about listening, looking, trying out, and being with, in pursuit of uncommon knowledge about humans and culture. Find show notes, plus our blog about anthropology's role in the world, at https://www.thefamiliarstrange.com. Twitter: @tfsTweets. FB: facebook.com/thefamiliarstrange. Instagram: @thefamiliarstrange. Brought to you by your familiar strangers: Ian Pollock, Jodie-Lee Trembath, Julia Brown, Simon Theobald, Kylie Won ...
 
“This is Product Management” interviews brilliant minds across the numerous disciplines that fuel the modern product manager. Episodes span from arts to science, tactics to strategies, confessions to professions. Take a deep dive into user experience, statistics, innovation, differentiation, design, development, metrics, and more with the latest podcast for product managers. Learn more and subscribe at thisisproductmanagement.com.
 
The Mindful Cranks broadly explores the cultural translation of Buddhism in the West, various facets of Buddhist modernism, and the mainstreaming of mindfulness in secular contexts. The podcast serves as a forum for voices that go beyond the dominant narratives which have been thus far uncritical of consumerism, medicalization, psychologization, corporatization and self-help approaches. Drawing from a wide range of disciplines — the humanities, philosophy, cultural studies, education, critic ...
 
These dialogues from the Wits School of Arts, Arts Research Africa project, are intended to stimulate practice, enable research, and inspire collective engagement around the question of Arts Research in Africa. Art lecturers and postgraduate students in the Wits School of Arts at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, are grappling with the challenge of positioning arts research in an African context. These podcasts seek to develop a dialogue with both national and international ...
 
The Third Wave Podcast explores the many minds of the emerging psychedelic renaissance. Through conversations with thought leaders across various disciplines, we explore how psychedelics, when used with intention and responsibility, catalyze transformation on both an individual and collective level. Are you a newbie fresh off an incredible first psychedelic experience? An experienced psychonaut with decades of use? Or just an interested bystander, curious about the relevance of psychedelics ...
 
best, c. is a new podcast project from Concordia's Ethnography Lab promoting graduate student research. Host/Producer: John Bryans Creative Producer: Anne-Marie Turcotte Sound Producer: Kris Millett Production Assistants: Adam van Sertima, Pauline Hoebanx, Juan Pablo Neri, John Deidouss
 
Service Lab is a podcast featuring talks given by leading service designers on their work and experiences. Our speakers include people like the Head of Service Design at GDS or Head of Product at UsTwo. And our talks range from case studies on online services to masterclasses on ethnography.
 
Raus aus dem wissenschaftlichen Elfenbeinturm und rein ins Ohr - das ist das Ziel des Lehrforschungsprogramms „Ethnografie vor der Haustür und in der Welt“ 2015/2016 unter dem Titel „Research, Action and Art“. Forschungs-, Kunst- und Integrationsprojekte aus Köln und der Welt treffen auf ethnologische Forschungsmethoden. Die teilnehmenden Studierenden stellen ihre Forschungsprojekte in diesem Podcast vor. In den Forschungen geht es um unterschiedliche Themenkomplexe wie Multikulturalismus, M ...
 
Podcasts from the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography. The School is renowned for its contributions to anthropological theory, its commitment to long-term ethnographic fieldwork, and its association with the Pitt Rivers Museum and the anthropology of visual and material culture. Home to over forty academic staff, over a hundred doctoral students, twelve Master’s programmes, and two undergraduate degrees (Human Sciences; Archaeology and Anthropology), Oxford anthropology is one of t ...
 
Sir Richard Francis Burton (1821 – 1890) was an English explorer, translator, writer, soldier, orientalist, ethnologist, linguist, poet, hypnotist, fencer and diplomat. He was known for his travels and explorations within Asia and Africa as well as his extraordinary knowledge of languages and cultures. According to one count, he spoke 29 European, Asian, and African languages.Burton's best-known achievements include traveling in disguise to Mecca, The Book of One Thousand Nights and A Night, ...
 
The Institute for Science, Innovation and Society (InSIS) researches and informs key contemporary and emerging issues and processes of social, scientific, and technological change. We combine the highest standards of scholarship and relevance to pursue and disseminate timely research in the UK and worldwide. We collaborate with leading thinkers around the world and welcome them to Oxford as visiting researchers. We nurture early career researchers through research fellowships in our various ...
 
We believe Mission and Margin is the business of healthcare. Business of Healthcare (BOH) interviews feature innovations sustainably improving healthcare Mission & Margin. Each discussion includes a healthcare executive and innovator concentrating on the same problem. Think “Nightline” or “How I Built This” just for healthcare. Recent guests have included Bernadette Spong, Chief Financial Officer, Orlando Health, Paul Kusserow, President & CEO, Amedisys, Blake Marggraff, Founder & Chief Exec ...
 
Platypus, the CASTAC Blog, presents "Down to a Science" a podcast that examines the world of science from social and historical perspectives. How does science work and does it have to work that way? Season 1 will discuss the economization of life, numbers and objectivity, and studying data science ethnographically. --- CASTAC’s mission is to facilitate communication within the AAA among anthropologists working in areas related to science, technology and computing, and to promote the visibili ...
 
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show series
 
This episode explores the comparative case method—as developed by Professor Kathleen Eisenhardt—with Professor Pinar Ozcan. This research strategy involves using one or more cases to create theoretical constructs, propositions and/or midrange theory from case-based, empirical evidence. In the conversation, we touched on the strengths and perils of …
 
Imagine that you volunteer for the clinical trial of an experimental drug. The only direct benefit of participating is that you will receive up to $5,175. You must spend twenty nights literally locked in a research facility. You will be told what to eat, when to eat, and when to sleep. You will share a bedroom with several strangers. Who are you, a…
 
Open source is the once-radical idea that code should be freely available to everyone. Open-source software was once an optimistic model for public collaboration, but is now a near-universal standard. But most open-source code is not developed by big teams or equitable collaborations; it’s maintained by unseen individuals who work tirelessly to wri…
 
News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Fluted tools were developed independently in North America and Arabia (details) Divers find rare intact Inca offerings in South American lake (details) Australian mining company apologizes for destroying Aboriginal heritage site (details) Northern Ireland’s Navan Fort may be part of larger temple complex …
 
In the West African nation of Togo, applying for the U.S. Diversity Visa Lottery is a national obsession, with hundreds of thousands of Togolese entering each year. From the street frenzy of the lottery sign-up period and the scramble to raise money for the embassy interview to the gamesmanship of those adding spouses and dependents to their dossie…
 
In New Orleans Carnival Balls: The Secret Side of Mardi Gras, 1870-1920 (LSU Press, 2017), Dr. Jennifer Atkins draws back the curtain on the origin of the exclusive Mardi Gras balls, bringing to light unique traditions unseen by outsiders. The oldest Carnival organizations emerged in the mid-nineteenth century and ruled Mardi Gras from the Civil Wa…
 
1-800-Worlds: The Making of the Indian Call Center Economy (Oxford University Press, 2018) chronicles the labour practices, life-worlds, and media atmospheres of Indian call centre workers, and locates them within the socio-political context of the new Indian middle classes. Through a thick description of the nightly and daily routines of transnati…
 
A content warning before this interview. Today’s topic centres around human trafficking activites in the Mekong reagion and our guest does mention some of the physical abuse that does take place in these situations. “I’m still to this day, very supportive of the UN if I’m going to put my policy hat on if you like” This week, we bring you an intervi…
 
This podcast features an intellectually orgasmic conversation between Paul F. Austin, founder of The Third Wave, and Louie Schwartzberg, the award-winning producer, director, and cinematographer responsible for the breakaway film, Fantastic Fungi. Tune in to hear what they have to say about the creation and grassroots promotion of Fantastic Fungi, …
 
Ananya Chakravarti’s The Empire of Apostles: Religion, Accommodatio and the Imagination of Empire in Modern Brazil and India (Oxford University Press), recovers the religious roots of Europe's first global order, by tracing the evolution of a religious vision of empire through the lives of Jesuits working in the missions of early modern Brazil and …
 
Professor David Tavárez’s edited volume, Words & Worlds Turned Around: Indigenous Christianities in Colonial Latin America (Boulder: University of Colorado Press, 2017), is a collection of eleven essays from historians and anthropologists grappling with the big questions of the Christianization of Mexico after the Spanish Conquest and using sources…
 
Kathleen Klaus, Assistant Professor of Politics at the University of San Francisco has written a terrific book, Political Violence in Kenya: Land, Elections, and Claim-Making published in 2020 by Cambridge University Press. Kathleen’s book is richly researched and beautifully written. She draws on 15 months of survey and interview methods to center…
 
In this episode, I talk with Dr. Leah Zani, a public anthropologist and poet based in California, about her truly wonderful book Bomb Children: Life in the Former Battlefields of Laos (Duke University Press, 2019). Her research takes place half a century after the CIA’s Secret War in Laos – the largest bombing campaign in history, which rendered La…
 
Arts Research Africa — In this dialogue I speak to Dr Michael Schwab, the co-initiator and inaugural Editor-in-Chief of JAR, the Journal for Artistic Research. Michael was most recently a keynote speaker at the ARA2020 Conference, on the theme of artistic research in Africa, which was held here at Wits University in January.As a JAR editor and a le…
 
In today’s episode, I talk with Dr. Greg Beckett, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Western University, about his richly grounded book There is No More Haiti: Between Life and Death in Port-au-Prince (2019, University of California Press – and it is coming out in a paperback edition this November). This book is an examination of “crisis” in Ha…
 
News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Coprolites in Oregon caves reveal lengthy human occupation (details) Source of Stonehenge monoliths found (details) Grape pips help archaeologists study ancient economy (details) Epidemics revealed in human teeth (details)By Archaeological Legacy Institute
 
Using the narratives of women who use(d) drugs, this account challenges popular understandings of Appalachia spread by such pundits as JD Vance by documenting how women, families, and communities cope with generational systems of oppression. Prescription opioids are associated with rising rates of overdose deaths and hepatitis C and HIV infection i…
 
In his book The Globally Familiar: Digital Hip-Hop, Masculinity, and Urban Space in Delhi (Duke University Press, 2020), Gabriel Dattatreyan departs from the existing literature on masculinity in India, which focuses on largely middle-class, upper-caste embodiments of the same. His focus is on non-elite, urban, lower caste/class embodiments of masc…
 
Tania de Jong AM is a trail-blazing Australian soprano, global speaker, and award-winning social entrepreneur who has developed five businesses and three charities—including Mind Medicine Australia, which supports psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy for the treatment of mental illness. In this wide-ranging podcast, she and Paul F. Austin talk about …
 
Students on J-Term in Louisiana Although Lives of the Mind is on break for the summer, we’d like to share this special bonus episode to tide you over until the school year begins again this fall. Augustana College recently made the switch from trimesters to semesters. This January was the school’s first crack at intensive J-Term courses, many of wh…
 
Vanita Reddy, in her book Fashioning Diaspora: Beauty, Femininity and South Asian American Culture (Duke University Press, 2016), locates diasporic transnationality, affiliations and intimacies through the analytic of beauty. Through her analysis of Asian American literary fiction and performance artwork and installations, Reddy lingers on moments,…
 
With such high levels of residential segregation along racial lines in the United States, gentrifying neighborhoods present fascinating opportunities to examine places with varying levels of integration, and how people living in them navigate the thorny politics of race. Among the many conflicts revolving around race under gentrification is crime a…
 
News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Studies of pirate shipwreck suggests Blackbeard abandoned it intentionally (details) Viking age burials produce smallpox DNA that adds new twist to history (details) New studies from Mexican cave and other early sites put North American arrival at 30,000 years ago (details) New site in Jerusalem is from t…
 
In this paper, the authors highlight factors that contribute to system‐level interdependence and discuss the implications these factors have for resident assessment. Read the accompanying article to this podcast: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/medu.14147By Medical Education
 
Trying to measure engagement in self‐regulated learning? This paper stresses the value of prioritizing microanalysis given relationships with biomedical science learning outcomes. Read the accompanying article to this podcast: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/medu.14079By Medical Education
 
Welcome back to a new season! With Covid-19 restrictions still in place, we bring you another Zoom panel! For this reason, the audio quality will be a little different to our usual studio sound.This week, we are joined by Sophie Chao, who we interviewed previously about her use of multispecies ethnography during her time with the Marind People and …
 
In The Movement for Reproductive Justice: Empowering Women of Color through Social Activism (NYU Press, 2020), Pat Zavella shows how reproductive justice organizations' collaborative work across racial lines provides a compelling model for other groups to successfully influence change. In the context of the war on women's reproductive rights and it…
 
In Re-enchanting Modernity: Re-enchanting Modernity: Ritual Economy and Society in Wenzhou, China (Duke University Press, 2020), Mayfair Yang examines the resurgence of religious and ritual life after decades of enforced secularization in the coastal area of Wenzhou, China. Drawing on twenty-five years of ethnographic fieldwork, Yang shows how the …
 
What if the moral guardians of West African societies are postmenopausal women? This is the argument that Laura S. Grillo makes in her 2018 book, An Intimate Rebuke: Female Genital Power in Ritual and Politics in West Africa (Duke University Press, 2018). Drawing on anthropological fieldwork in Côte d’Ivoire that spans three decades, Grillo elabora…
 
In her fascinating book, Material Acts in Everyday Hindu Worlds (SUNY Press, 2020), Joyce Flueckiger analyzes the agency of materiality, that is, the ability of materials to have effect beyond what was intended. This ethnographic journey across three Indian locales examines the agency of various materials – from ornaments, to female guising, to cem…
 
Those who exit a religion—particularly one they were born and raised in—often find themselves at sea in their efforts to transition to life beyond their community. In Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple UP, 2020), Schneur Zalman Newfield, who went through this process himself, interviews seventy-fo…
 
On this months’s podcast we have Aaron Brien (Apsáalooke), a member of the Night Hawk Dance Society and faculty in Salish Kootenai College’s Tribal Historic Preservation and Native American Studies programs and Dr. Shandin Pete (Salish/Diné), Director of the Indigenous Research Center at Salish Kootenai College. We talk briefly about how the two go…
 
How have the everyday practices of parenting been shaped by patriarchy and coloniality? What are the transformative potentials of feminist parenting? In Feminist Parenting: Perspectives from Africa and Beyond, an anthology edited by Rama Salla Dieng and Andrea O’Reilly published in 2020 by Demeter Press, 28 writers from Africa, its diaspora, and ar…
 
News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Push for development in India paves over the past (details) Excavation seeks mass graves of Tulsa race massacre victims (details) New Bronze Age burial pushes back the date for earliest horse riding (details) Underwater research off Australia finds new early sites (details)…
 
Will Rollason is senior lecturer of anthropology at Brunel University London. He’s written a fascinating book titled Motorbike People: Power and Politics on Rwandan Streets (Lexington Books, 2020). Will’s book is an ethnography of taxi-moto drivers in Kigali, Rwanda’s capital city. Not only is his book a rich account of the everyday lives of motorc…
 
Dr. Julie Holland—a psychiatrist specializing in psychopharmacology and author of the recently-released book, Good Chemistry: The Science of Connection From Soul to Psychedelics—riffs with Paul F. Austin on oxytocin, music, death, and using psychedelics to activate our parasympathetic state of being. Get ready for a ride that covers topics ranging …
 
It's no surprise that many of us find ourselves increasingly on mobile devices or the internet. We shop online with ease, connect with friends and family on social media, check the news, and play games. And especially during the era of COVID millions, more people are figuring out if they can work remotely. In this episode, Adam sits down with Dr. J…
 
L. L. Wynn’s book Love, Sex, and Desire in Modern Egypt: Navigating the Margins of Respectability (University of Texas Press, 2018) is an interrogation of urban life and gendered mobilities in Cairo, Egypt. She discusses categories of kinship, tourism, friendship, love, and sex through the lens of “respectability”; and in the process illustrates ho…
 
Mark Anderson’s From Boas to Black Power: Racism, Liberalism and American Anthropology (Stanford University Press) is at once a story about US anthropology and US liberalism from the 1930s to the 1960s. By interrogating the Boasian intervention into the idea of biological race, Anderson shows how, despite their progressive and anti-racist intention…
 
What’s love got to do with it? Intimate Geopolitics: Love, Territory and the Future on India’s Northern Threshold (Rutgers University Press, 2020) by feminist political geographer Sara Smith tell us - everything! Smith’s book centers intimacy in the consideration of geopolitics which is otherwise only seen as a game between nation states. The accou…
 
News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Dismantling a Confederate monument reveals time capsule (details) Divers find ancient ocher mines on Yucatan peninsula (details) Rock engravings found in Israeli burial chamber (details) Archaeologists uncover the history of Ethiopian lake (details)By Archaeological Legacy Institute
 
By the time Bolivian President Evo Morales was deposed in December 2019, it had become increasingly clear that Latin America’s Pink Tide – the wave of left-leaning, anti-poverty governments which took hold of the region in the mid-2000s – was fast receding. Many have attempted to explain the rise and fall of that extraordinary historical movement, …
 
Ismael Garcia-Colon, Colonial Migrants at the Heart of Empire: Puerto Rican Workers on U.S. Farms (University of California Press, 2020) is the first in-depth look at the experiences of Puerto Rican migrant workers in continental U.S. agriculture in the twentieth century. The Farm Labor Program, established by the government of Puerto Rico in 1947,…
 
Christopher Titmuss is perhaps the most senior teacher of Vipassana and Insight Meditation in the Western modern world. Titmuss was an ordained monk in Thailand, spending six years there from 1970 to 1976. During that time, he resided for three years in a monastery with Ajahn Dhammadharo, his Vipassana (Insight Meditation teacher) and Ajahn Buddhad…
 
In Food In Cuba: The Pursuit of a Decent Meal (Stanford University Press, 2020), Hanna Garth examines the processes of acquiring food and preparing meals in the midst of food shortages. Garth draws our attention to the social, cultural, and historical factors Cuban’s draw upon to define an appropriate or decent meal and the struggle they undergo to…
 
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