show episodes
 
Need something new to talk about? Subscribe to the podcast that challenges the way you see everything. The Walrus Talks is a national event series that sparks conversations on the issues that matter most to Canadians. The events feature seven thought leaders and industry experts talking for seven minutes each, with seven different perspectives on a single topic. *The music in this podcast has been licensed and is called Intelligent Molecule by LexPremium.
 
Welcome to "Be Strong To Be Useful" or BSTBU, the "sister" podcast of the Multi-Hazards podcast at multi-hazards.libsyn.com. ! Host Vin Nelsen launches on a new podcast adventure! BSTBU is an excuse for Vin to unleash his inner creative monster into the world. There'll be more chance to address issues quickly, shorter episodes (hopefully), lots of solos and maybe some surprises like cool interviews with rappers and musicians, movie producers and actors, maybe music and movie reviews and othe ...
 
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show series
 
The pandemic has torn off the bandages & life support we've had. For 70+ years we've developed & maintained systems & institutions that are failing us. The elites, the billionaires & their political pals, can't save us. Grassroots, bottom-up movements based on science, nature & reality need to act now to change our system. Let's be the right change…
 
Inspired by the 2020 documentary "Totally Under Control," the madness that is LinkedIn, & the extreme inspiration of activist Dominic Frongillo, host Vin Nelsen responds to the politicians, Emergency Managers & Climate Change Adaptation experts who say "We got this!" The only proper response is people power. Step up and take action. One, two, many …
 
Decolonise yourself: What does it mean? Canada was born out of European colonisers taking over the land from indigenous peoples over the centuries and now. The system is still here and we are it. What can we do to root out the British Empire that still continues in Canada's system and culture . . . to root it out of our hearts? How can we engage wi…
 
Decolonise yourself: What does it mean? Canada was born out of European colonisers taking over the land from indigenous peoples over the centuries and now. The system is still here and we are it. What can we do to root out the British Empire that still continues in Canada's system and culture . . . to root it out of our hearts? How can we engage wi…
 
It’s a gut-wrenching, even agonizing video. As a distraught, bed-ridden Joyce Echaquan pleads for help, a nearby nurse and an orderly at a Quebec hospital do not seem particularly concerned with her condition. "You're stupid as hell," one can be heard saying in French: the other tells the mother of seven she’s made bad choices in life, asking what …
 
Are you a settler or are you indigenous? If you're indigenous, love your culture(s)! If you're a settler like me, let's connect with indigenous people and work together to bring justice and joy to indigenous communities and individuals all over Turtle Island (North America) and beyond. This is host Vin Nelsen's lifelong journey and especially the l…
 
Pandemic. SHTF. All kinds of chaos around us. What can we do? Be mindful. Meditate. Dr. Dzung Vo is a pediatrician and adolescent medicine specialist from BC Children's Hospital. His advice on mindfulness can cut through the noise and lack of order around us in society and help us stay sane and safe (https://www.straight.com/living/mindfulness-offe…
 
Welcome to "Be strong to be useful" or BSTBU! In this episode, Vancouver, Canada's host Vin Nelsen discusses what urgency is, why we need it and where he himself got it. He also talks about: *volunteering *multi-hazards *indigenous peoples *the global COVID-19 pandemic *online education: synchronous & asynchronous *Messiah Complexes *Being communit…
 
New sounds of the city. One of Canada’s largest centres—amiskwaciy-wâskahikan (aka Edmonton)—could be on the verge of Indigenizing the nomenclature of its political sub-divisions. Drawing on languages such as Blackfoot and Cree, the suite of newly-proposed names for Edmonton's 12 wards were recently voted on by city council, with a two-thirds major…
 
Welcome to "Be Strong To Be Useful" or BSTBU! Host Vin Nelsen does a Territorial Acknowledgment then launches on a new podcast adventure! BSTBU is the sister podcast for the Multi-Hazards podcast (multi-hazards.libsyn.com) and an excuse for Vin to unleash his inner creative monster into the world. There'll be more chance to address issues quickly, …
 
THIS WEEK: 'Chapter 2' of The Anti-Indigenous Handbook. A look into the "constellation of corporations, special interest organizations, politicians, lobbyists, and hate groups work[ing] to limit or eliminate… [Indigenous] self-determination,” the ‘Handbook’ gathers together reports from the US, Canada and Australia. In part one of our sit-down with…
 
Learning requires exploration of one's identity, and according to our next speaker, this is a First People’s principle of learning that applies to all of us. So on this international day of translation, and at this time when we can’t greet each other in person and with physical contact, this is an opportunity to communicate better with each other. …
 
The Anti-Indigenous Handbook: A collective effort spanning three countries, this 'Handbook' is the joint product of four media outlets: the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, The Guardian Australia, High Country News, and The Texas Observer. And though each case embodies anti-Indigeneity in its own particular way, what they have in common are c…
 
Settler panic in the Atlantic. Why do opponents of a new Mi’kmaq fishery in southwestern Nova Scotia speak as if it’s illegal when it has the support of a 21-year-old Supreme Court ruling? Why do they persist with arguments that the fishery could endanger the stock when not even 10 licenses are involved—an iota compared to the millions of pounds ca…
 
This week: Indigenous Gender and Sexuality Studies. A subject at the center of a talk delivered this past March by Dr. Jennifer Nez Denetdale, Professor of American Studies at the University of New Mexico, and the author of Reclaiming Diné History: The Legacies of Navajo Chief Manuelito and Juanita. Historic figures with a direct connection to Dene…
 
On this week’s collected, connected conversations (the last of our summer-long series), we bring you part two of our resource resistance retrospective. Yet, as part one revealed, these issues are hardly historical. Indeed, it was only six months ago that the Royal Canadian Militarized Police—in full riot gear and armed to the teeth—raided Wet’suwet…
 
Natural talent is overrated - at least according to singer-songwriter Corb Lund. He works hard to create it and believes that work - that constant challenge to focus and refine - is what separates the artists from the rest. And that art itself needs to be accessible to everyone, even the people that don't see country music as art. See acast.com/pri…
 
This week’s collected, connected conversations (the seventh in our summer-long series) make up the first part of a double-episode look at resource resistance, inspired by a struggle too big to ignore, one punctuated by striking video of back-to-back raids by militarized police against small Indigenous encampments in what's now known as interior Bri…
 
On this episode’s collected, connected conversations (the sixth in our summer-long series): we get down with data and tight with tech, tackling topics that range from social media to social services. Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): • Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University …
 
On this episode’s collected, connected conversations (the fifth in our summer-long series): navigating the harms and hopes associated with drugs. From alcohol to opioids, taxes to testing, you could say we’ve explored our fair share of substances on this show. Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): • Kim TallBear, associate …
 
It’s hard, as we go into the triple digits of days that some of us have been at home, isolating from friends and society, to maintain hope. When Olympian Waneek Horn-Miller talks about the health issues endured by the Indigenous people of Canada, she emphasises that hope is what gets her through. Her mother taught her that. She was a Hope-maker. He…
 
On this week’s collage of collected, connected conversations (the fourth in our summer series): appropriation and authenticity. The second half of our extended foray into the arts, our topics range from tacky souvenirs to the endless parade of Settlers pining to play Indian, as we question the images of Indigenous people: who gets to make and profi…
 
On this week’s collected, connected conversations (the third in our summer series), the arts take centre stage. A stage so wide, it’ll take two acts to cover it all. For our first act, we look at representation and misrepresentation, be it on-screen, on stage, or on the page. From gatekeepers to white fragility, it ain’t easy trying to be Indigenou…
 
The barriers to building inclusion can feel insurmountable. Especially when people are trying to be politically correct by ignoring differences. According to inclusion professional Ritu Bhasin, we need to notice the differences between us and learn about them, rather than deny that they exist. Ritu Bhasin is a speaker, author, and a leadership and …
 
Maybe it was easier to avoid heated debates before we were all living under pandemic rules. Or maybe this is just the result of our small bubbles of safety, but when we have different opinions.. getting caught up in Twitter arguments or disagreeing with family members, it’s easy to forget about what the other person is going through. In this talk, …
 
In our second summer series collection of connected conversations: a checkup on the state of Indigenous health. A thorough examination of how the Canadian health system can all too often operate against Indigenous well-being via ill-considered policies and practices. Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): • Mary Jane McCallu…
 
Something that gets brought into stark focus at a time like this is the value of things. The value of being able to hug a friend you haven’t seen in a long time. The value of being able to work from home and stay positive. The value of adapting to this new environment. Cobb spoke about the inherent value of things VS what they are financially value…
 
Once again this year, we at MEDIA INDIGENA have dug deep into our archives to bring you a summer-long series of collected, connected conversations, on a variety of topics: from drugs to data, the arts to activism. We begin with a subject some argue has always been at the heart of the Canadian project: genocide. Once dismissed outright as an object …
 
Amanda Parris is a playwright and the host of CBC’s, Exhibitionists and Marvin’s Room and she spoke about her fear of being forgotten by a culture that seems to prefer to forget stories like the ones that she tells and amplifies. How does denial affect us in our individual lives, and what can we do to remedy Canada’s Collective Amnesia? See acast.c…
 
THIS WEEK: A systemic look at media. It’s the second half of our extended conversation with our very own Candis Callison and Mary Lynn Young, co-authors of Reckoning: Journalism’s Limits and Possibilities. Published by Oxford University Press, it’s the work of former practitioners in the field who now study and teach the craft at the University of …
 
On this episode: part one of our extended conversation on the limits and possibilities of journalism. And these days, we hear little about the latter, a lot about the former—even before COVID-19 took its toll on the industry. Some blame media companies’ downfall on the digital: the interwebs and smartphones shredding the business model of now-obsol…
 
THIS WEEK: NAISA INDIGENA. And just who or what is a “NAISA”? It’s the Native American Indigenous Studies Association. Or as they put it, a “professional organization for scholars, graduate students, independent researchers, and community members interested in all aspects of Indigenous Studies.” Many of whom gather every year to share and discuss t…
 
THIS WEEK: Food and environmental justice. Topics at the heart of a talk given back in February by Dr. Priscilla Settee, Professor of Indigenous Studies at the University of Saskatchewan, and Adjunct Professor for the Natural Resources Institute at the University of Manitoba. A global educator and activist from Cumberland House Swampy Cree First Na…
 
It’s impossible to miss the common thread in the images of protest on all our screens these days. People have reached their limit. They are sad. They are angry. And despite a global pandemic, they are gathering in protest. Criticism will always follow protest, and much of the criticism is aimed at the so-called youth. Every generation seems to take…
 
THIS WEEK: The ‘Looting’ of America. As if a pandemic wasn’t enough to contend with, disturbing video came out on social media this week of blatant police brutality against a black resident of the Minneapolis-St. Paul area, video that has sparked outrage in streets across the US. Outrage met with tear gas, smoke bombs and rubber bullets. Meanwhile,…
 
On this week’s episode: “Indigenous Knowledge and Heavens,” the title of a talk delivered earlier this year by Inuk scholar, Dr. Karla Jessen Williamson. An Assistant Professor of Educational Foundations at the University of Saskatchewan, the Greenland-born academic is the first Inuk to be tenured at a Canadian university. Following Williamson’s le…
 
THIS WEEK: Weapons and exceptions. The Liberal government’s recently-announced ban on 1500 types of assault weapons is not going over well with certain gun owners. Could the exemption for, among others, Indigenous hunters make them a target? We cover which weapons the ban covers, and whether Canada always walks its talk concerning violence. Joining…
 
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