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Best Friedrich Nietzsche podcasts we could find (updated March 2020)
Best Friedrich Nietzsche podcasts we could find
Updated March 2020
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Save for his raucous, rhapsodical autobiography, Ecce Homo, The Antichrist is the last thing that Nietzsche ever wrote, and so it may be accepted as a statement of some of his most salient ideas in their final form. Of all Nietzsche’s books, The Antichrist comes nearest to conventionality in form. It presents a connected argument with very few interludes, and has a beginning, a middle and an end.
 
Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844–1900) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher. He wrote critical texts on religion, morality, contemporary culture, philosophy and science, using a distinctive German language style and displaying a fondness for aphorism. Nietzsche’s influence remains substantial within and beyond philosophy, notably in existentialism and postmodernism. Thus Spake Zarathustra is a work composed in four parts between 1883 and 1885. Much of the work deals with ideas such a ...
 
Beyond Good and Evil, by Friedrich Nietzsche A searing indictment of concepts like “truth” and “language” Beyond Good and Evil, by Friedrich Nietzsche is a deeply thought provoking book that forms one of the keystones of modern thought and politics. In this book, Nietzsche takes the position that our subservience to fixed perspectives that are forced on us by our language and our ideals make us incapable of perceiving reality. He propounds the theory that ideals are not fixed but change over ...
 
Of The Twilight of the Idols, Nietzsche says in Ecce Homo: “If anyone should desire to obtain a rapid sketch of how everything before my time was standing on its head, he should begin reading me in this book. That which is called ‘Idols’ on the title-page is simply the old truth that has been believed in hitherto. In plain English, The Twilight of the Idols means that the old truth is on its last legs.” Certain it is that, for a rapid survey of the whole of Nietzsche’s doctrine, no book, sav ...
 
A collection of three of Nietzsche's writings concerning the music of Wagner. In particular, he relates Wagner's music as degenerate, unrefined and unintelligent and relates it to a gradually degenerating German culture and society. The translator provides a detailed introduction. - Summary by the Reader
 
First published in 1886 at Nietzsche’s own expense, the book was not initially considered important. In it, Nietzsche denounced what he considered to be the moral vacuity of 19th century thinkers. He attacked philosophers for what he considered to be their lack of critical sense and their blind acceptance of Christian premises in their considerations of morality and values. Beyond Good and Evil is a comprehensive overview of Nietzsche’s mature philosophy.(Summary from Wikipedia)
 
Save for his raucous, rhapsodical autobiography, Ecce Homo, The Antichrist is the last thing that Nietzsche ever wrote, and so it may be accepted as a statement of some of his most salient ideas in their final form. Of all Nietzsche’s books, The Antichrist comes nearest to conventionality in form. It presents a connected argument with very few interludes, and has a beginning, a middle and an end. The reason to listen to this version is that H.L. Mencken, the famous journalist, turned Nietzsc ...
 
The philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche's autobiography, Ecce Homo, was the last prose work that he wrote before his illness in 1889. Coming at the end of an extraordinarily productive year in which he had produced The Twilight of the Idols and The Antichrist, Nietzsche shuns any pretense at modesty with chapter titles include “Why I am so Wise”, “Why I am so Clever” and “Why I Write Such Excellent Books”. His translator Anthony M. Ludovici states, Ecce Homo “is not only a coping-stone worthy of ...
 
Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844–1900) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher. He wrote critical texts on religion, morality, contemporary culture, philosophy and science, using a distinctive German language style and displaying a fondness for aphorism. Nietzsche's influence remains substantial within and beyond philosophy, notably in existentialism and postmodernism. Thus Spake Zarathustra (Also sprach Zarathustra), is a work composed in four parts between 1883 and 1885. Much of the w ...
 
In 1887, with the view of amplifying and completing certain new doctrines which he had merely sketched in Beyond Good and Evil (see especially Aphorism 260), Nietzsche published The Genealogy of Morals. This work is perhaps the least aphoristic, in form, of all Nietzsche's productions. For analytical power, more especially in those parts where Nietzsche examines the ascetic ideal, The Genealogy of Morals is unequalled by any other of his works; and, in the light which it throws upon the atti ...
 
I'm that YouTube Philosophy Guy! Find more than 1,500 videos in my main channel. Support my video and podcast work! https://www.patreon.com/sadler Due to popular demand - and with the work underwritten by my Patreon supporters - I have started converting my videos into MP3 files listeners can listen to anywhere they want! Once I reach a higher level of support on Patreon, I plan to start creating original episodes in a new podcast series. Want to help me get that started? Become a supporter!
 
Of The Twilight of the Idols, Nietzsche says in Ecce Homo: “If anyone should desire to obtain a rapid sketch of how everything before my time was standing on its head, he should begin reading me in this book. That which is called ‘Idols’ on the title-page is simply the old truth that has been believed in hitherto. In plain English, The Twilight of the Idols means that the old truth is on its last legs.”Certain it is that, for a rapid survey of the whole of Nietzsche’s doctrine, no book, save ...
 
Nature and the Nation explores politics, philosophy, psychology, sociology and economics from a naturalistic, paleoconservative perspective, using the format of a book review. I examine books published in a wide array of time periods, with a special emphasis on the early to middle 20th century, the ancient Greeks, and of course the present.
 
Currently I am diving into two books: “Beyond Good and Evil” by Friedrich Nietzsche and “Discourse on Method and The Meditations” by Rene Descartes. I am by no means an expert, I am just an enthusiastic student and learner. Join me on my journey exploring the greatest minds of our civilization. Thank you for listening, I hope you enjoy! :) Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/huxleysworld/support
 
Welcome to Banned Books, where we read and converse with the rebel children, the holy mischief-makers of God, who fight against the kind of useless religious, spiritual, and moral methods of life improvement that seeks to smother the glory of God in Jesus Christ. We want to introduce you to those who forgot everything except Jesus Christ and him crucified. We all struggle with fear of being last, lost, least, littlest, and dead, and so we are here to encourage, challenge, provoke, and maybe ...
 
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I’m Not Really A Joiner. Gillespie and Riley finish their reading and discussion of Friedrich Nietzsche’s “Antichrist.” This episode, state religion, Christian civil religion, and being your own god. Text: The Antichrist (1888), Aphorisms 16 Show Notes: Nietzsche (bio) — Questions? Comments? Show Ideas? Send them to us at BannedBooks@1517.org. And,…
 
This lecture discusses the 19th century philosopher, Friedrich Nietzsche, and focuses on his work Thus Spoke Zarathustra, specifically his discussion in part 1 of the State as a locus of superfluous people and as a corrupter of the strong. He differentiates between a State and a people or nation (Volk) in terms of the values and the way power opera…
 
This lecture discusses the 16th century philosopher, theologian, and mathematician, Blaise Pascal, and focuses on his work, the Pensees. Specifically it discusses the role that "diversions" (divertissments) play in our lives. We engage in them at least in part, to avoid facing up to our actual condition, which is typically more miserable than we ac…
 
This lecture discusses the 16th century philosopher, theologian, and mathematician, Blaise Pascal, and focuses on his work, the Pensees. Specifically it discusses about how self-love (amour propre) renders human beings averse to acknowledging the truth about themselves, others, and the world. Self love makes us prefer a false self-image to the trut…
 
This lecture discusses the 16th century philosopher, theologian, and mathematician, Blaise Pascal, and focuses on his work, the Pensees. Specifically it discusses his distinction between two different mindsets or perspectives, the "intuitive mind" (l'esprit de finesse) and the mathematical mind (l'esprit de géométrie). Both of these have to do with…
 
Luther moves pretty fast. You don’t stop and read carefully once in a while, you could miss it. Gillespie and Riley continue to read and discuss Martin Luther's commentary on Galatians (1535). This episode, Jesus, jerks, COVID-19, and foxes. Text: Martin Luther's Commentary on St. Paul's Epistle To the Galatians (1535) Show Notes: Astonished Heart …
 
This lecture discusses the 16th century philosopher, theologian, and mathematician, Blaise Pascal, and focuses on his work, the Pensees. Specifically it discusses his views on the "two infinites" - the infinitely great and the infinitely small (the latter of which, in his view still contains a great amount of stuff) - and their implications for hum…
 
Luther’s Gospel Piñata! Gillespie and Riley read and discuss Martin Luther’s 1535 Galatians commentary. This episode, true wisdom, Satan, and the point of Paul’s letter to the Galatian church. Text: Martin Luther's Commentary on St. Paul's Epistle To the Galatians (1535) Show Notes: Jefferson’s Bible — Questions? Comments? Show Ideas? Send them to …
 
This lecture discusses the 16th century philosopher, theologian, and mathematician, Blaise Pascal, and focuses on his work, the Pensees. Specifically it discusses what "tyranny" - including but going beyond the political sense - consists in. In his view, the basis of tyranny is the desire to dominate beyond one's own area of legitimate value, compe…
 
This lecture discusses the 16th century philosopher, theologian, and mathematician, Blaise Pascal, and focuses on his work, the Pensees. Specifically it discusses his advice about how to get a person to accept criticism or correction. Pascal notes that nobody wants to be told he or she is simply wrong about an issue, but people are willing to admit…
 
This lecture discusses the short story by the science fiction and fantasy author, Ursula K. Leguin, and the ethical problem for the citizens of the city of Omelas raised by her narrative.To support my ongoing work, go to my Patreon site - www.patreon.com/sadlerIf you'd like to make a direct contribution, you can do so here - www.paypal.me/ReasonIOY…
 
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