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Best Greg C podcasts we could find (updated August 2020)
Best Greg C podcasts we could find
Updated August 2020
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Broadcasting paranormal news and fun stories from our CreepGeeks Bunker Studio in the Mountains of Western North Carolina! We’re an offbeat news podcast that takes a light-hearted approach to the strange, the stupid, paranormal & tech topics circulating the web. You can call the show and leave us a message! 1-575-208-4025 Your Hosts Greg and Omi
 
SportsAvengers.com is quickly becoming one of the leading Internet Sportstalk Networks online. They rank in the Top Ten consistently, according to Live365.com, the largest streaming audio site in the world, averaging about 2.5 million hits per month. SportsAvengers has listeners in over 80 countries, and their staff includes former professional athletes from all major sports, including Lonnie Marts, Eugene Chung, Ron Duguay, and former veteran media columnist Greg Larson.
 
Mixing drama, learning and digital media, theatre company C&T strive to make its work stand for more than theatre. In these regular podcasts, C&T examine these overlapping interests, exploring, through interviews, reviews and debate, new approaches to applied theatre, drama education, creative work with young people, community theatre, digital and popular culture. More than theatre is supported by the University of Worcester, UK and the Elmley Foundation.
 
The Unfiltered Gentlemen ‘Craft Beer-cast’ is a weekly podcast centered around craft beer: the liquid, the lifestyle, and everything in between. Every week Greg, Scott, and Dan, with some help from their beer-reviewing contributors from around the globe, are keeping you entertained and well hydrated with their craft beer reviews, beer experiments, and all the essential Booze News. Every few weeks, we sit down with the head brewer or owner of local craft breweries to sample their craft and fi ...
 
Welcome to the Stuff I Heard podcast, where I talk about podcasts, Netflix, time travel, multiverse, Elon Musk, grilling, patriotism, religion, politics, and life... Instagram: jtatpeek or StuffIHeardPodcast YouTube: Joshua Peek Email: stuffiheardpodcast@gmail.com Let's change the world by building our community! I'm inspired by Bert & LeeAnn Kreischer, Joe Rogan, Pete Holmes, Whitney Cummings, Casey Neistat, and... Greg Steele "5 in 40" Danny McWilliams "Stuff I Kinda Care About" Alex Smith ...
 
Tech Talks are a podcast imagined and created by the folks over at the Center for Democracy and Technology. We're a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that believes in the power of the Internet – and works to protect it, and the people it empowers. Let us know what you think – #techtalkcdt
 
It has been said that leaders are readers. I whole-heartedly agree with that. I believe that the person you will be 5 years from now will be determined by the people you associate with and the books you read. Well your on your own with the association part, but I can help with the book reading side of the equation. The Leaders Bookshelf is a weekly podcast featuring great books that will propel you forward in life... Tune in! Featuring authors like Stephen Pressfield, Tom Rath, Michael Gerbe ...
 
The world of brand and agency marketing is constantly changing. The best way to keep up? Listen in as Nick Taylor of Lippe Taylor sits down with marketers, makers, brand executives, agency veterans, technologists, friends and key voices of innovation in the marketing ecosystem. Each week he and his guests will bring you relevant discussions and bite-sized insights on the topics driving shifts in marketing, advertising, social media, influencer marketing, technology and consumer buying behavi ...
 
The SE Tech Podcast, hosted by Morris, Manning & Martin, LLP, is a place to build connections and learn about startup and fast-growth tech companies in the Southeast. We interview founders and entrepreneurs to discuss their companies, business models, and experiences. Inquiries are welcome and can be sent to Samantha Crotty at scrotty@mmmlaw.com. Disclaimer: The content presented on the SE Tech Podcast is for informational and educational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice, n ...
 
The unseen creature whose ravenous fangs dog your every step as your footfalls echo down the midnight alleyway. — A long, icy shadow looming over you, making the hairs on your neck rise and your breath turn to ragged puffs of mist. — Unearthly howls that pierce the night, pulling you from the comfort of sleep with feverish, heart-pounding dread. — Welcome to Tales to Terrify, a weekly horror fiction podcast that gets under your skin, lays eggs and hatches writhing baby horrors nursed on your ...
 
Conversations with people making the news and the journalists who cover them. Legislators and guests with expertise in a wide range of topics including: the economy, technology, education, the environment, the military, and many more talk with reporters who cover their shared area of interest.
 
In Dead Pilots Society, scripts that were developed by studios and networks but were never produced are given the table reads they deserve. Starring actors you know and love from television and film, a live audience, and a good time in which no one gets notes, no one is fired, and everyone laughs. Presented by Andrew Reich (Friends; Worst Week) and Ben Blacker (The Writers Panel podcast; co-creator, Thrilling Adventure Hour).
 
Sir Thomas More is a collaborative Elizabethan play by Anthony Munday and others depicting the life and death of Thomas More. It survives only in a single manuscript, now owned by the British Library. The manuscript is notable because three pages of it are considered to be in the hand of William Shakespeare and for the light it sheds on the collaborative nature of Elizabethan drama and the theatrical censorship of the era. The play dramatizes events in More's life, both real and legendary, i ...
 
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show series
 
Sixteen athletes from eleven sports arenas. Each chapter tells a different story, as each superstar shares the habit that helped them accomplish their goals and reach the pinnacle of their profession. Sports fanatic or not. Guaranteed to tap into your athletic edge, Jeremy Bhandari's Trust the Grind: How World-Class Athletes Got to the Top (Mango P…
 
The beginning of the modern contraceptive era began in 1882, when Dr. Aletta Jacobs opened the first birth control clinic in Amsterdam. The founding of this facility, and the clinical provision of contraception that it enabled, marked the moment when physicians started to take the prevention of pregnancy seriously as a medical concern. In Contracep…
 
Two prominent Israeli liberals argue that for the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians to end with peace, Palestinians must come to terms with the fact that there will be no "right of return." In 1948, seven hundred thousand Palestinians were forced out of their homes by the first Arab-Israeli War. More than seventy years later, most of the…
 
As we enter the third decade of the 21st century, American nuclear policy continues to be influenced by the legacies of the Cold War. Nuclear policies remain focused on easily identifiable threats, including China or Russia, and how the United States would respond in the event of a first strike against the homeland. In their new book, The Button: T…
 
Professor David Tavárez’s edited volume, Words & Worlds Turned Around: Indigenous Christianities in Colonial Latin America (Boulder: University of Colorado Press, 2017), is a collection of eleven essays from historians and anthropologists grappling with the big questions of the Christianization of Mexico after the Spanish Conquest and using sources…
 
Lady Cecily Kay has just returned to England when she encounters Sir Barnaby Mayne. It’s 1703, Queen Anne is on the throne, and London’s coffee houses are buzzing with discussions of everything from science and philosophy to monsters and magic. Of course, Cecily has no plans to join the ongoing conversations; coffee houses bar the door to female vi…
 
For most Americans, the war the United States waged in the Pacific in the Second World War was one fought primarily by the Navy and the Marine Corps. As John C. McManus demonstrates in Fire and Fortitude: The US Army in the Pacific War, 1941-1943 (Dutton Caliber), however, this obscures the considerable role played by the soldiers of the United Sta…
 
In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, we’re hearing an awful lot about the fraught relationship between science and media. In his book, News from Mars: Mass Media and the Forging of a New Astronomy, 1860-1910 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019), historian of science Joshua Nall shows us that a blurry boundary between science and journalism was …
 
This sweeping new history recognizes that the Civil War was not just a military conflict but also a moment of profound transformation in Americans' relationship to the natural world. To be sure, environmental factors such as topography and weather powerfully shaped the outcomes of battles and campaigns, and the war could not have been fought withou…
 
Professor David Tavárez’s edited volume, Words & Worlds Turned Around: Indigenous Christianities in Colonial Latin America (Boulder: University of Colorado Press, 2017), is a collection of eleven essays from historians and anthropologists grappling with the big questions of the Christianization of Mexico after the Spanish Conquest and using sources…
 
Check out Constance Sabella's art, reach out to her at sabella.constance@yahoo.com and tell her you heard about her on the podcast Stuff I Heard by Joshua Peek. She's working on putting her art online somehow for viewing and purchasing. I have linked her watercolor of the "Rain" painting I bought for my Mama on my instagram jtatpeek Check it out. P…
 
In Breakaway Americas: The Unmanifest Future of Jacksonian America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2020), Thomas Richards Jr., a history teacher at Springside Chestnut Hill Academy, argues that the map of North America was not preordained. Richards uses the Republic of Texas, the 1830s Patriot War, the Mormon exodus, and several other examples fro…
 
In 2009, a novel was released in Norway with a fairly simple premise; the author would simply write about himself, his life and his attempts to write. The autobiographical novel would be the first in a 6-volume series that would eventually total over 3,500 pages written in just 3 short years. The frenzied pace at which it was produced would only be…
 
Despite the devastation caused by the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and 60-foot tsunami that struck Japan in 2011, some 96% of those living and working in the most disaster-stricken region of Tōhoku made it through. Smaller earthquakes and tsunamis have killed far more people in nearby China and India. What accounts for the exceptionally high survival r…
 
It is often said that bioethics emerged from theology in the 1960s, and that since then it has grown into a secular enterprise, yielding to other disciplines and professions such as philosophy and law. During the 1970s and 1980s, a kind of secularism in biomedicine and related areas was encouraged by the need for a neutral language that could provi…
 
“The most interesting women in the world!” That’s how Claire Robertson describes African women, and it’s hard to disagree with her after reading Holding the World Together: African Women in Changing Perspective (University of Wisconsin Press, 2019), co-edited with Nwando Achebe. In 16 chapters, 19 contributors explore everything from issues of repr…
 
Beginning in the 1950s, a group of academics, businesspeople, and politicians set out on an ambitious project to remake North Carolina’s low-wage economy. They pitched the universities of Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill as the kernel of a tech hub, Research Triangle Park, which would lure a new class of highly educated workers. In the process, the…
 
In this episode, I talk with Dr. Leah Zani, a public anthropologist and poet based in California, about her truly wonderful book Bomb Children: Life in the Former Battlefields of Laos (Duke University Press, 2019). Her research takes place half a century after the CIA’s Secret War in Laos – the largest bombing campaign in history, which rendered La…
 
Nozomi Naoi’s Yumeji Modern: Designing the Everyday in Twentieth-Century Japan (University of Washington Press, 2020) is the first book-length English-language study of one of Japan’s iconic twentieth-century artists, Takehisa Yumeji (1884–1934). While he is most famous for portraits of beautiful women and stylish graphic design―which remain enormo…
 
Under dictatorship in Argentina, sex and sexuality were regulated to the point where sex education, explicit images, and even suggestive material were prohibited. With the return to democracy in 1983, Argentines experienced new freedoms, including sexual freedoms. The explosion of the availability and ubiquity of sexual material became known as the…
 
What were some of the major transformations taking place for Muslim communities in the Russian Empire of the eighteenth century? How did the introduction of a state-backed structure for Muslim religious institutions alter Islamic religious authority in the empire? And who exactly was Abu Nasr Qursawi and what was his reformist project to grapple wi…
 
Popular culture helps shape how audiences imagine Biblical personalities in our contemporary moment. For many, Warner Sallman’s portrait of Jesus fixes him as white, others envision Moses as Charlton Heston because of Cecil B. DeMille’s film, The Ten Commandments, and the Jezebel stereotype is more well known than the Biblical figure. This merging …
 
Mormonism's founder, Joseph Smith, claimed to have translated ancient scriptures. He dictated an American Bible from metal plates reportedly buried by ancient Jews in a nearby hill, and produced an Egyptian "Book of Abraham" derived from funerary papyri he extracted from a collection of mummies he bought from a traveling showman. In addition, he re…
 
Kathleen Klaus, Assistant Professor of Politics at the University of San Francisco has written a terrific book, Political Violence in Kenya: Land, Elections, and Claim-Making published in 2020 by Cambridge University Press. Kathleen’s book is richly researched and beautifully written. She draws on 15 months of survey and interview methods to center…
 
In this episode, I talk with Dr. Leah Zani, a public anthropologist and poet based in California, about her truly wonderful book Bomb Children: Life in the Former Battlefields of Laos (Duke University Press, 2019). Her research takes place half a century after the CIA’s Secret War in Laos – the largest bombing campaign in history, which rendered La…
 
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