Grovercleveland public
[search 0]
More

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Loading …
show series
 
The nation goes to Mars. In a book, at least. A look at the cultural 1890's decade. Science fiction, A new form of voiced patriotism, Exploding growth in cities. And an American Winston Churchill. Music by the excellent Kevin MacLeod (find him on free music archive.org) and Lee Rosevere (find him on Bandcamp). We are part of Airwave Media Podcast N…
 
In this second look at the decade of the 1890's. Economic disaster and marching citizens. Pitchfork and tin making rebellion. Competing metals and ideas. An election only makes clearer the divisions in society - it does not create them. An author struggle to captures these modern conflicts and develop a new fairy tale. Music by the excellent Kevin …
 
How did things get modern in America? The popularity of a color derived from coal tar is just one of the ways. A look at the 1890's, a decade where America developed in many ways. A look at the 1890's, a decade where America developed in many ways. This is part of a FOUR PART series of podcasts on My History Can Beat Up Your Politics. X-rays, flyin…
 
It's the most abstract of the economic stats and yet, it's the most personal. It's the one that often has turned Presidents into crusaders. And sometimes turned the American people into the critical actors, volunteers or even 'the problem'. Pins, gardens and tough talk on this episode about Presidents, shrinking dollars, and rising prices. We are p…
 
Auctioning people for paid jobs, Resisting smoking and liquor bans, Actors in trouble, Fistfight in Congress, Prosperity around the corner and News articles spreading fear and encouraging violence. With Jon Blackwell, Wall Street Journal Editor and creator of the Twitter handle This Day in 1921, we discuss significant news stories of 1921 that have…
 
Jose Huizar grew up in Boyle Heights – a working-class Latinx neighborhood in L.A. Eventually, he became their councilperson. He ran on promises of solidarity and community. And, for the most part, people trusted Huizar... until the day the FBI raided his home and offices, looking for evidence of corruption. The Feds would go on to say that Huizar …
 
Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren's policy of Indian population removal, which lead to the Trail of Tears and thousands of deaths, was not uncontested or passively allowed at the time. Nearly half of Congress opposed it, as did petition writers all over the nation. So did one of the President's former friends and of course, most of the elected re…
 
Vice President under Monroe, Tompkins was a popular populist republican governor of New York and symbol of young America. But he had a problem. Tim Pearson's book on Vice Presidents is Second Fiddle - https://www.amazon.com/Second-Fiddle-Strange-Elected-President/dp/0692877401/ This episode's sponsor - Light Stream credit card consolidation www.lig…
 
We look at the Anti-Masonic Party of the 1820s and 1830s from backwater movement to national stage and its lasting influence on one of the two major parties today, and on political conventions. Was it truly a conspiracy theory-based movement? What can it say about today's politics. And a candidate who didn't want to run for President. We look at al…
 
We take a look at a few topics, the "Joe Manchins" of History, Senators who have disagreed with their own parties Presidents, while also helping in some ways. FDR, Clinton and Lyndon Johnson dealt with their own versions of the dynamic in politics today. We are also reminded in telling this story that Clinton had a 50-50 Senate, in a form. And a bi…
 
WIth Matthew from the Political Darkside podcast, Bruce discusses Joe Biden, his story, and the issues of crime, business, busing and more. Find Matthew's podcast at www.politicaldarkside.com Sponsored by Conflict of Nations App - Check out Conflict of Nations WW3 Player to Player Strategy Game Support the Podcast on Patreon: www.patreon.com/mhcbuy…
 
Of the many things Grover Cleveland is remembered for, his still extant wedding cake stands out for the few visitors to his birthplace home in Caldwell, N.J. He's not a President much remembered though podcasts have revived knowledge about him a bit. We discuss Cleveland, his legacy, and a great fight of the 1880's that determined executive power. …
 
Andrew Carnegie went from a bobbin-boy child worker to becoming the richest man in America. He also inspired generations of philanthropists, and his money is still at work today educating minds, funding books and pushing for world peace. But his story raises questions. His attitude towards unions was friendlier than most business people of his day …
 
How did 9/11 the day become 9/11 the idea? That question drives award-winning host Dan Taberski (Missing Richard Simmons, Running From COPS, The Line) to shift his focus to what happened on 9/12, and every day after that. 9/12 is a poignant, surprising, and surprisingly funny seven episode series about people who wake up on 9/12 having to navigate …
 
Nixon's first bombing campaigns had the names of mealtimes which seem to also correspond with the years of his first term: 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972. In this episode we look at Nixon, Kissinger and the Paris Peace Accords that ended the Vietnam War. In addition to providing some additional context for the Saigon 1975 situation so much in the news toda…
 
With podcast host of Revolutions and History of Rome Mike Duncan, we talk about the Marquis de Lafayette. He left an aristocratic life in France to fight in the American Revolution, and did so with bravery and zeal. He remains the central figure of American-French cooperation. Mike talks about Lafayette's role not just in American history but in Fr…
 
We look at the 1975 Operation Frequent Wind - the evacuation of Saigon and the comparisons to today's events, the politics at the time and now and more. Also - FOR UNBIASED NEWS (or to have a fair chance at seeing the bias), download the app at Ground.News/myhistory. Support our sponsor. The first thing to know is, despite the image of failure, tho…
 
Break your news bubble and see biases in coverage clearly -Download our sponsor Ground News's App at - Ground.News/myhistory All about Signers in this one. We talk to Jason Petri, listener to MHCBUYP about his playing card deck project, and we discuss: :the lives of the signers What can Button Gwinnett, Stephen Hopkins or Thomas Heyward Jr. do for …
 
Opponent of the filibuster and sometimes a royal pain for the President he served under, Dawes is probably one of the most accomplished Vice Presidents of the United States. In his life time he would win a Nobel Peace Prize, posthumously he would win a Grammy. Friend to both William McKinley and William Jennings Bryan, a banker who could play that …
 
A Democratic President and a liberal Senator push a free-market reform in the late 1970s that affects us all today. We look at the story of the Airline Deregulation Act of 1978. Among the topics - legroom politics, cold fried chicken, consumer rights, cargo politics, Carter's legislative ability or lack of it, champagne denial, mistreated pets, and…
 
We are joined by Richard Bey of "The Richard Bey" show and "People are Talking" fame for a talk on a lot of things. We are pleased to have Richard as a long time listener of the show. Richard takes aim at the current depiction of cancel culture as a new thing, which is especially easy for him as he was canceled himself at least twice. Richard and B…
 
Vaccine history, acceptance and denial. The man who saved Boston and never got credit. Law and the citizen and medicine. FDR's polio - if it was polio - and what it meant for America. From 2014, with an update for our times. And we encourage all - Get your COVID-19 shot when eligible. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices…
 
You know about the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the shot heard around the world, the minutemen and their trifold hats and muskets. But how much do you really know about the day's events? This episode we look at the day of fighting at Concord, when a British raiding party turned into a display of American resistance and a trial run for American…
 
We speak to Dennis Kucinich about his fight to save Cleveland's municipal power system as mayor of the city in 1970's. He risked not only his career but his life during that battle, and he gives us some of the details from his new book -"The Division of Light and Power" Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices…
 
We know Jefferson and Franklin, but what about the other signers - John Hart, John Penn, William Williams, Richard Stockton, William Whipple, John Morgan, William Floyd, George Read and others Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesBy Bruce Carlson
 
One violent event, captured in the best media technologies of its time and brought to American living parlors, completely changed American politics during the Reconstruction period. A convention at the stately Mechanics' Institute in New Orleans, determined to create a new constitution where all races could vote, was forcefully ended by police in w…
 
This episode is all about voting in the federal capital we now call the District of Columbia. We talk about a movement to get voting rights that succeeded for a group of (then) D.C. residents 180 years ago, And about the petitions, committees, tea parties, bus trips and statements by Presidents over the years, and the reactions of Congress to them.…
 
Known for being Lincoln's first VP and dropped from the ticket, Hamlin was actually as well-known as the President he served under. He was a fighter against the expansion of slavery and an important Senator. It was not out of the question that Hamilin could have been in Lincoln's spot. History has forgotten, but we'll give him a few words in this l…
 
For Wall Street Insiders, Black Monday was not the worst day. The next day, Terrible Tuesday was an agonizing test of the financial system. As part of our series on the commercial history of the United States, we examine the events of Tuesday the 20th. And we look at the history of insurance in America, the reasons there is a stock market, what was…
 
Lincoln's turbulent period as President-elect also featured a novel twist: a thirteen-day train ride through the states that had cast their votes for him, and two that had not. He countered large cheering crowds and some security risks, while he managed to avoid opining on the fast-paced events of the day and to avoid compromising with violence. We…
 
Worried hands gripping phones. Black screens with green digits, going downward. Faces pressed against fancy brokerage office glass. Busy signals. The history of Black Monday 1987 crash and the history of what came before it, from stock commodities and even butter and eggs. This is the first of what will be a two-parter on commerce, risk and the att…
 
5,000 or more people died in Philadelphia between August and November of 1793. Thousands of others, including the President, fled the capital of the country. In this recast of a 2014 episode, we look at this epidemic and the reaction to it at the time, what healthcare looked like in the 1790's, and other topics. Learn more about your ad choices. Vi…
 
In this episode, no big deal, we just tackle about every significant problem we have in our politics today. norm-breaking, free-speech and free-speech limits, threats and violence, double impeachments, pushing envelopes and reverse virtue signaling is all part of this episode. Also, Abigail Adams, a treaty won by a forceful speech, a shadowy organi…
 
About Presidents and their parties, particularly situations where a former President who was not re-elected is still in the political picture. There can be some interesting challenges for the party. We look at four cases in history, Gerald Ford's golfing and soft-pedaling in 1980, Truman's attack on a front-runner in 1956, Bush's largely successful…
 
Stealth ads. Secret advice. Kids in uniforms. Soft money and hard choices in the information age. As we discuss in this cast, a Presidential election was almost completely settled a year before it happened. Some knew an election was going on and some didn't. In a time when money was soft and people said things like: 'This website's taking a long ti…
 
Edward Stettinius, Jr. served a short but important time as Secretary of State serving F.D.R. and Truman. Without him, there may not have been a UN. And because he got very little credit, he was able to be successful. With journalist Bill Scher, host of the "When America Worked" Podcast we discuss Stettinius and pragmatists in general, and Bill tal…
 
In this episode, we speak with Cheryl Woodruff Brooks, author of Washington was a cosmetic entrepreneur whose company turned her into one of of America's first black millionaires. She was founder and president of Apex Enterprises consisting of Apex Beauty Colleges, Apex Publishing Company, Apex News & Hair Company, Apex Laboratories and Apex Drug C…
 
We know the globe-running, meeting master Vice President Cheney, but did you know his parents were hardcore Democrats? or that he thought his father turned into a bird (albeit at a pretty young age). As we discuss with Tim Pearson, author of Second Fiddle, a book about Vice Presidents. Cheney's story goes from the football field, to Yale, to the sl…
 
Events 100 years ago have nothing at all to do with today's events, unless you consider new technologies changing the pace of life, the immigration issue, a new administration changing messaging and policies, racism and racial violence, crime, labor struggles, international conflicts and government spending on the poor. And,new kindsofpoems. (Music…
 
The Constitution contains two possible forms of presidential removal outside of election, one is the much-discussed impeachment process. The other is the 25th Amendment's fourth section. We discuss 25 Section 4 with Professor Brian C. Kalt, Professor of Law & Harold Norris Faculty Scholar at Michigan State University, including how the amendment wo…
 
The 13th Vice President of the United States remains obscure. Where King's name does come up, it's often with the wrong picture. Or he's confused with Rufus King. According to our guest, Thomas Balcerski, Associate Professor of History at Eastern Connecticut University, he should be in the discussion. Balcerski is author of Bosom Friends: The Intim…
 
In 1892, a dreaded disease caused a President to navigate local health situation and created a new law. We look at the precedent-setting quarantine order of the 23rd President, Benjamin Harrison. While we are at it, we look at Harrison's presidency, policies, his influence on future events, his failed attempt to obtain fair elections for both Afric…
 
From the early attempts to depict Washington, to the first Congressional attempts to block Confederate statues, to today's debate. In this episode Bruce examines the history behind statues in America, and Bruce looks at every debating point and angle he can think of regarding Confederate statues, the dates of their construction and their removal. P…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login