show episodes
 
Kamuela Kaneshiro shares tales of people, legends, traditions, and Gods from the Pacific cultures occupying Asia, Australia, the Americas, and all the islands nations in between. These are the stories that influenced films, Marvel and DC comic books, Disney movies, Netflix series, TV shows, and books. Episodes include a featured song, and Hawaiian word.
 
Hawaii’s Best provides travel tips and resources for your next visit to Hawaii. Through our blog and podcast, we provide resources, travel tips, and local, Hawaiian cultural insights to help prepare you for your Hawaii vacation so you can experience true Hawaii. We feature the stories and culture of Hawaii's best experiences, influencers, and businesses. Whether you're traveling to Oahu, Maui, Kauai, Big Island of Hawaii, or Lanai; let's explore Hawaii together! Hawaii’s Best is for anyone w ...
 
From our humble beginnings as a small chain of eclectic Southern California convenience stores, Trader Joe’s has grown to become a national chain of 514 (and counting) neighborhood grocery stores, employing more than 50,000 Crew Members. How? By being comfortable with being different. For the first time, our Captains (store managers) and Crew Members (employees) are taking you Inside Trader Joe’s in a podcast series only Trader Joe's could deliver. Go inside: * A private Tasting Panel, where ...
 
Welcome to my podcast, where amazing things happen! I’m Shawnalei and id like to take you on a transformational journey filled with Motivational mindset, Success, Leadership, Law of Attraction and Business. Sometimes we find resources in order to help us along the way. I believe there there are no coincidences in life and we stumble upon things because there was a divine purpose. I created this podcast as a way of giving back. My passion for personal and professional growth has me constantly ...
 
More than 154 million treasures fill the Smithsonian’s vaults. But where the public’s view ends, Sidedoor begins. With the help of biologists, artists, historians, archaeologists, zookeepers and astrophysicists, host Lizzie Peabody sneaks listeners through the Smithsonian’s side door, telling stories that can’t be heard anywhere else. Check out si.edu/sidedoor and follow @SidedoorPod for more info.
 
This is a collection of newspaper articles written by Samuel Clemens, for various newspapers, between 1862 and 1881. After Feb 3rd 1863, he began using the pen name Mark Twain. This compilation is the work of Project Gutenberg and contains articles from TERRITORIAL ENTERPRISE, THE SAN FRANCISCO DAILY MORNING CALL, THE SACRAMENTO DAILY UNION, DAILY HAWAIIAN HERALD, ALTA CALIFORNIA, THE CHICAGO REPUBLICAN, and THE GALAXY. (Introduction by John Greenman)
 
Welcome! All My Relations is a podcast hosted by Matika Wilbur (Swinomish and Tulalip), and Desi Small Rodriguez (Northern Cheyenne) [previously by Dr. Keene] to explore our relationships— relationships to land, to our creatural relatives, and to one another. Each episode invites guests to delve into a different topic facing Native American peoples today. We keep it real, play some games, laugh a lot, and even cry sometimes. We invite you to join us!
 
Step into the home of four siblings from Hawaii who love to tease, laugh, debate, and share embarrassing childhood memories. Topics range from popular culture, life in Hawaii, comedic skits on current events, and much much more. This is our journey and we invite you to laugh and cry with us as we navigate this thing called life with those that know us best and for some reason choose to love us anyway.
 
He's been the face and the voice of breakfast... Now he's forcing himself into your ear-hole at a different time. Let Johnny and his team finish off the working day with topical chat and marvellous music. It'll get you home - and make you think. Hear Johnny on Radio X every weekday at 4pm across the UK on digital radio, 104.9 FM in London, 97.7 FM in Manchester, on your mobile or via www.radiox.co.uk.
 
Exploring Hawaii and its stories. Hawaii is a place filled with stories—both ancient and still unfolding at this very moment. Join us as we share these stories with the world. Transmission from Hawaii is a production of Wasabi Magazine (www.readwasabi.com) and hosted by Tony Vega, editor in chief of Wasabi Magazine. If you have any ideas for a future episode, please email mail@readwasabi.com.
 
Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox features engaging, akamai, one-on-one conversations with some of the most intriguing people in Hawaiʻi. Leslie brings out personal stories revealing experiences and values molding the people who shape our community. Long Story Short is a production of PBS Hawaiʻi. Visit our website at www.pbshawaii.org.
 
Aloha and welcome to "Da Local Perspective" Podcast. A lot of people have a really "simplistic" idea of what itʻs like to live in Hawaii. Most of the time they use words like... "paradise" "relaxing" "beach all day" "mai taiʻs" etc. (You know what im talking about), but for the locals who live and exist here; it is a totally different story. Donʻt get me wrong Hawaii is absolutely a beautiful place to live, but its more then just beaches and luʻauʻs as most people think. How exactly? I know ...
 
The word "Aloha" is familiar around the world. But how many people know what it actually means in the Hawaiian language? It's more than a greeting, more than "love", and actually more than you can translate into English. It's a feeling, it's a relationship, it's the exchange of life. "Sharing Aloha" is a podcast that will share the essence of "Aloha" through storytelling, inspirational talks, fun facts of Hawaiian history, and much more. The world today can be so negative. In times of a pand ...
 
Feed the Fire Podcast comes directly out of the Hawaiian Islands in Maui— and is a ministry of King's Chapel Lahaina with Pastor Robb Gorringe. Pastor Robb's humor, relatability, and passion for God will both encourage and challenge you into a deeper walk with God. For more, check our website at :: http://www.kclahaina.com
 
On his most recent album, "Peace Love Ukulele," ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro mixes jazz, rock, classical, traditional Hawaiian music, and folk, creating a sound that is technically masterful, emotionally powerful, and completely unique in the music world. Join Jake at this special event for a discussion about his music and then see him perform songs from his latest release.
 
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show series
 
Twelve companies of American missionaries were sent to the Hawaiian Islands between 1819 and 1848 with the goal of spreading American Christianity and New England values. By the 1850s American missionary families in the islands had birthed more than 250 white children, considered Hawaiian subjects by the indigenous monarchy and U.S. citizens by mis…
 
Aloha mai kakou, Please enjoy this broadcast of new Hawaiian music, most of which you have probably never heard before. Click here to support the show: Hawaiian Concert Guide Tip Jar Ali'i 'Iolani Kuana Torres Kahele Nani Wai'ale Ku'u Wehi 'o Ka Po Kalani Miles He Mele No Papa Hanalei Lani Michael Keale Come Back Home Hanohano Wailea Michael Keale …
 
Keenan Sue: Won State Championship in 2019 with Punahou High School in Honolulu. Graduated from Punaho, went to college at McCallister College in Minnesota, and coaches at the college. Also a pilot for Hawaiian Airlines for over 25 years. Keenan Sue Punahou High School Head Baseball Coach for 7th year talks about Practice Organization, Dealing with…
 
By Davy Crockett You can read, listen, or watchIn the late 1970s, Hawaii had the most runners per-capita than any other state. Some called it the “running capital of the world.” Hawaii was also an early adopter of the 100-mile race and other ultras distances races. Similar to the Fort Mead 100 in Maryland (see episode 75), Hawaii’s first 100-milers…
 
In this groundbreaking episode, Natalie & Drew expose the sick truth behind The Beach Boys, as well as the hidden dirt on pneumatic bank tubes, macadamia nuts, volcanos, and exactly how you get between all of the islands in Hawaii. What are Rhode Islanders up to? Where did the people in Hawaii come from? And, finally, what is the Hawaiian Death Tri…
 
With California fully reopening on June 15, many restaurants are poised to drop capacity limits and masks. Good Food looks at the idea of hospitality, starting with longtime server Tiffany Coty at Lawry’s. Essayist and activist Priya Basil describes the roots of the word “hospitality” and the notion of give and take in and outside of the industry. …
 
It took this long to realise that there are very few 4-7 THANG listeners who don't have a Ford Escort memory. This week, we get yours! Plus Tom Grennan, a Kent Gorilla and Super Hoff! Enjoy! Hear Johnny on Radio X every weekday at 4pm across the UK on digital radio, 104.9 FM in London, 97.7 FM in Manchester, on your mobile or via www.radiox.co.uk…
 
Hi Johnny Vaughan fans – we have a new True Crime podcast we think you’ll enjoy called ‘If It Bleeds It Leads’ Could you be a criminal? What separates the way you think, from the criminal mind? Join the world’s leading professor of criminology, Prof. David Wilson and star of Silent Witness Emilia Fox as they discover what’s really going on behind s…
 
Despite enormous advances in medical science and public health education over the last century, access to health care remains a dominant issue in American life. U.S. health care is often hailed as the best in the world, yet the public health emergencies of today often echo the public health emergencies of yesterday: consider the Great Influenza Pan…
 
David Lodge meets Franz Kafka meets Stephen King? All attempts to classify The Scapegoat, let alone to summarize what happens in this compelling and terribly troubling first novel by Sara Davis, seem destined to fail. As the author tells Duncan McCargo, her book has not always been understood by readers in the ways she imagined - but then, The Scap…
 
Featuring exclusive interviews with the internationally renowned architects: Kengo Kuma; Alberto Campo Baeza; Špela Videcnik (OFIS); Fernanda Canales; Jonathan Sergison (Sergison Bates); and Jane Hall (Assemble) Entering Architectural Practice (Routledge, 2020) is a practical and honest guide for architecture students, entering the world of archite…
 
A new approach to puritan studies has been emerging in recent decades, but until now, no single volume has tried to gather in a comprehensive way the new histories of this literature. In A History of American Puritan Literature (Cambridge UP, 2020), edited by Kristina Bross and Abram Van Engen, eighteen leading scholars in the field help to mark a …
 
In this episode, I interview Anahid Nersessian, professor of English at UCLA, about her book, Keats’s Odes: A Lover’s Discourse (University of Chicago Press, 2021). In 1819, the poet John Keats wrote six poems that would become known as the Great Odes. Some of them—“Ode to a Nightingale,” “To Autumn”—are among the most celebrated poems in the Engli…
 
In an era of rampant Islamophobia, literary representations of Muslims and anti Muslim bigotry tell us a lot about changing concepts of cultural difference. In Islamophobia and the Novel (Columbia University Press, 2018), Peter Morey, Professor at the University of Birmingham, analyzes how recent works of fiction have framed and responded to the ri…
 
The Outside: Migration as Life in Morocco (Indiana UP, 2021) traces how migration has come to occupy a striking place in the lives of many Moroccans. A full 10 percent of the population now lives outside the country, affecting individual and collective life in countless unanticipated ways. In this intimate ethnography of rural Morocco, Alice Elliot…
 
We are here today with Manon Garcia, the author of We Are Not Born Submissive: How Patriarchy Shapes Women’s Lives, published this year, 2021, by Princeton University Press. The book was originally published in 2018 by Climats as On ne naît pas soumise, on le devient. This book was a phenomenon and a runaway bestseller when released in France. We a…
 
In 2014 and 2015, students at dozens of colleges and universities held protests demanding increased representation of Black and Latino students and calling for a campus climate that was less hostile to students of color. Their activism recalled an earlier era: in the 1960s and 1970s, widespread campus protest by Black and Latino students contribute…
 
What do startling photographic images of state violence from events such as the 6 October 1976 massacre at Thammasat University tell us about the nature of human rights in Thailand? In conversation with NIAS Director Duncan McCargo, Karin Zackari of Lund University discusses some of the key themes that emerge from her doctoral thesis, the first stu…
 
In the developing world, political turmoil often brings an end to promising economic growth stories. During its period of rapid economic growth in the 1990s and 2000s, China experienced a remarkable surge in the number of public protests. Yet these protests did not destabilize the regime. Yao Li’s book, Playing by the Informal Rules: Why the Chines…
 
A story about an alien invasion typically revolves around diplomacy, military strategy, technological one-upmanship, and brinksmanship. But the invaders in Andy Weir’s Project Hail Mary: A Novel (Ballantine Books, 2021) are anything but typical. Rather than a scheming sentient enemy, Weir gives us Astrophage, an opponent who is mindless—and microsc…
 
Today I talked to Paul Davis about her new book Beating Burnout at Work: Why Teams Hold the Secret to Well-Being and Resilience (Wharton School, 2021) What if companies held executives responsible for the turn-over rate, absenteeism rate, and the degree to which employees in the department they direct had higher-than-usual chronic mental and physic…
 
Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren’t an island, and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we’d bring in an expert about something? Email us at cgessler05@gmail.com or dr.danamalon…
 
Todd H. Weir and Hugh McLeod, two leading historians of religion, have teamed up to edit a volume in the Proceedings of the British Academy that explores how conflicts between secular worldviews and religions shaped the history of the 20th century. With contributions considering case studies relating to Judaism, Christianity, Islam, atheism and com…
 
More than anywhere else in the world, Asia is experiencing an infrastructure boom. Although it is driven by both internal and external factors, this boom has accelerated noticeably as a result of China’s Belt and Road Initiative, which seeks to extends port, railway and other connections throughout and across Southeast Asia. But what is the cost of…
 
What does ethnography look like when presented as fiction? In this episode, we talk with Alexandros Plasatis, author of the new book Made by Sea and Wood, in Darkness (Spuyten Duyvil, 2021) a linked book of short stories based on the lives of Egyptian immigrant fishermen and other marginalized residents of a Greek town. Alexandros describes the fie…
 
Plato and the Mythic Tradition in Political Thought (Harvard UP, 2020) is an ambitious reinterpretation and defense of Plato’s basic enterprise and influence, arguing that the power of his myths was central to the founding of philosophical rationalism. Plato’s use of myths—the Myth of Metals, the Myth of Er—sits uneasily with his canonical reputati…
 
A young man who turns his desire to join the army into a long stint as a volunteer ambulance driver. A teacher living in an old slum who is the only one brave—or foolish—enough to confront the gangs. A refugee who becomes a community organiser. A woman in a traditional village looking at the new development quickly encroaching on their land. A bore…
 
At the intersection of epistemology and philosophy of language is a puzzle. First, it seems we don’t need less evidence for a claim that we know something if the practical importance of the knowledge claim shifts. Second, it seems we shouldn’t assert that we know something if we don’t. Third, it seems that if the practical importance of a knowledge…
 
He's the destroyer of evil, the pervasive one in whom all things lie. He is brilliant, terrifying, wild and beneficent. He is both an ascetic and a householder, both a yogi and a guru. He encompasses the masculine and the feminine, the powerful and the graceful, the Tandava and the Laasya, the darkness and the light, the divine and the human. What …
 
The title of Edward Westermann's new book, Drunk on Genocide: Alcohol and Mass Murder in Nazi Germany (Cornell University Press, published in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, 2021), suggests that it is about the use of alcohol by perpetrators of the Holocaust. And it is. Westermann documents extensively how alcohol serv…
 
In 2013, Whole Foods CEO John Mackey started a movement with Conscious Capitalism, a New York Times bestseller that taught the power of the heroic spirit of business. Since then, readers and fans have been asking Mackey for a follow-up on leadership. Now he's answered their call, to inspire entrepreneurs and trailblazers to take the next step: as l…
 
Political Theorist Robert Bartlett spoke with the New Books in Political Science podcast about two of his recent publications, which take on translating the work of two distinct classical thinkers, Aristotle and Aristophanes. In discussing these thinkers, we talked about two of Aristophanes’ earliest extant plays, The Acharnians and The Knights. We…
 
One year to the day after George Flloyd’s murder, Dr. Jamila Lyiscott discusses her book on racial justice in education: Black Appetite. White Food. Issues of Race, Voice, and Justice Within and Beyond the Classroom (Routledge, 2019) A community-engaged scholar-activist, nationally renowned speaker and spoken word artist, Assistant Professor of Soc…
 
Overcoming Challenges in the Mental Capacity Act 2005: Practical Guidance for Working with Complex Issues (Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2019) both delivers on what promises and more: it gives practical and ethical guidance for mental health law practitioners, and applicable tools to apply the Mental Capacity Act 2005. It also provides the ethical a…
 
Here comes the podcast, with its myths like always. We’re covering the origins of the classic, Beauty and the Beast, and decide that if we try, we can all be disembodied himbos. Content Warning: This episode contains conversations about or mentions of Stockholm syndrome, family abuse, death, imprisonment, institutionalization, illness, misogyny, in…
 
Artwork as opposed to experiment? Engineer versus artist? We often see two different cultural realms separated by impervious walls. But some fifty years ago, the borders between technology and art began to be breached. In Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture (MIT Press, 2020), W. Patrick McCray shows how…
 
Elizabeth A. Povinelli’s inheritance was passed down not through blood or soil but through a framed map of Trentino, Alto Adige—the region where family's ancestral alpine village is found. Far more than a map hanging above the family television, the image featured colors and lines that held in place the memories and values fueling the Povinelli fam…
 
In 1976, the San Francisco Giants headed north of the border and became the Toronto Giants - or so the sportswriters of the time would have you believe. In The Giants and Their City: Major League Baseball in San Francisco, 1976-1992 (Kent State UP, 2021), the journalist and scholar Lincoln Mitchell explains how the team and the city narrowly avoide…
 
In the 1970s, American curator Donna Stein served as the art advisor to Empress Farah Diba Pahlavi, the Shahbanu of Iran. Together, Stein and Pahlavi generated an art market in Iran, as Stein encouraged Pahlavi’s patronage of the Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art. Today, the contemporary section of the Iranian National Collection―most of which cont…
 
After a cascade of failures left residents of Flint, Michigan, without a reliable and affordable supply of safe drinking water, citizens spent years demanding action from their city and state officials. Complaints from the city's predominantly African American residents were ignored until independent researchers confirmed dangerously elevated blood…
 
In his new book Why Should We Obey the Law? (Polity Press, 2018), George Klosko, the Henry L. and Grace Doherty Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia, has provided an introduction to the competing theories behind why people should obey the law. What Klosko refers to as “political obligations” exist in all societies, but he seeks to re…
 
The laws that govern psychiatric treatment under coercion have remain largely unchanged since the eighteenth century. But this is not because of their effectiveness, rather, these laws cling to outdated notions of disability, mental illness and mental disorder why deny the fundamental rights of this category of people on an equal basis with all oth…
 
Holocaust and Genocide historians have spent much time and effort recently considering the connections between the experiences and ideas of colonialism and subsequent mass atrocity violence. Jonas Kreienbaum's recent book A Sad Fiasco: Colonial Concentration Camps in Southern Africa, 1900–1908 (Berghahn Books, 2019) is an important contribution to …
 
Author Diana Stevan's sequel to the award-winning Sunflowers Under Fire. Lukia's story continues in Lilacs in the Dust Bowl (Peregrin Publishing, 2015), an inspirational family saga about love and heartache during the Great Depression. In 1929, when Lukia Mazurets, a widow and a Ukrainian peasant farmer, immigrates to Canada with her four children,…
 
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