show episodes
 
Hidden History is a weekly podcast produced and hosted by Ellis Tucci that focuses on the elements of history that you didn't know you didn't know. Whether it's the history of the color purple, the science behind early electronic music, or the political history of the banana, we've got you covered.
 
Have you ever spent hours looking for something you simply lost? How about a hundred years? How about looking for a missing airplane? Or a vanished civilization? Every other Monday, Gone searches for everything lost. From D. B. Cooper to the Holy Grail, the Etruscan language to early Russian cosmonauts; if it disappeared, we’re looking. After all, just because something is gone, doesn’t mean it can’t be found. Gone is a production of Cutler Media and part of the Parcast Network.
 
Hidden Histories sees Helen Carr exploring some of the country's hidden treasures, as she and some of our finest historians scramble through the actual spaces where history happened. Whether she's visiting the whorehouses of Covent Garden, or retracing the steps of the Peasants Revolt, Helen and her guests are a delightful guide to the hidden histories that lie just off the beaten track.
 
Stories from our book, The White House's Unruly Neighborhood: Crime, Scandal and Intrigue in the History of Lafayette Square. The podcast is based on our tours of the Washington, D.C. region's wild, hidden history and on our other books. Our book is available at: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-white-houses-unruly-neighborhood-edward-p-moser/1131103788https://www.amazon.com/White-Houses-Unruly-Neighborhood-Lafayette-ebook/dp/B082ZVDCD7/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1555118270& ...
 
The History of Fun explores the hidden backstories behind the things you enjoy. This season, we’re diving into the amazing origins of your favorite holiday traditions. Join Polygon’s Russ Frushtick, Allegra Frank, and Chris Plante each week as they embark on a new quest to uncover these common-yet-mysterious customs. Produced by Polygon and the Vox Media Podcast Network.
 
They’ve been around for thousands of years…orchestrating some of history’s most controversial events. And if not for their radical actions, you may never have even known they existed. Every Thursday, take a journey through hidden passageways and become a member of Parcast’s diabolical series, SECRET SOCIETIES. Each society is explored in 2 episodes—exposing the people and context responsible for its founding, and analyzing the psychology behind their beliefs.
 
Hidden Legal Figures rediscovers the untold stories of the legal efforts that have shaped the American story. Each week, a new episode featuring nationally recognized experts in law and history help us understand all about the heroic and vital legal efforts that changed the fate of a nation. More than a Podcast. We're an oral museum.™
 
Welcome to the Night-Light/Spiritually-Speaking radio show, a forum for spiritual enlightenment, cosmic understanding and insight into those etheric realms that ever surround us. Host, Barbara DeLong and a wide variety of fastinating guests will be sharing with you spiritual information and philosophies that you can use to enlighten your lives and open you the creative sources you carry within. This venue allows me to reach out to greater numbers of you and to provide you with new insight an ...
 
Condensed Histories bridges the gap between history and popular culture. In each episode of Condensed Histories our host, Jem Duducu, takes an item of popular culture and looks under the surface to find real history hiding inside. From shows on Netflix, Prime or Disney Plus, to the lastest blockbuster films, and even video games, songs, board games and food, Jem shows us how much history is lurking in our everyday entertainment. Wandavision, The Dig, Warhammer, Queen’s Gambit, Assassin’s Cre ...
 
In three episodes, this podcast tracks a bestselling author’s quest to solve the mystery of the 1937 "Hindenburg" disaster. In his book "The Hidden Hindenburg," Michael McCarthy unearthed a whistleblower, a cover-up, and corruption on two continents. Listen here to the Zeppelin captains, a last surviving witness of the tragedy, and the story behind the story.
 
“The past is filled with incredible mysteries; the clues to solving them all around; hidden in plain sight. But these stories begin with some of the most famous vanishings in history." Join attorney Jennifer Taylor and investigator Chris Williamson as they re-open some of the biggest disappearance cases in all of history. Chasing clues, witnesses and new information Jennifer and Chris will take you on the ride of a lifetime and uncover new evidence in some of the biggest historical cold case ...
 
Are you a lover of mysteries, a seeker of the unknown? If so, welcome to Hidden: a podcast that takes a closer look at the shadowed fringes of our society. Join us every other Wednesday as we pull back the curtain to discuss all things cults, cryptids, and conspiracies.
 
Welcome to Hidden Truth Show with Jim Breslo, a weekly series which dives deeply into controversial and unresolved issues of our time to discover the truth, irrespective of political correctness, religion, or politics. In the new Season 2, “Transgender Movement,” we explore what it means to be transgender, ask who is really behind the movement, and question whether it is based on science or political correctness. Along the journey to find the truth, Jim interviews doctors, psychologists, the ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
Episode 108: In the 1850s and 1860s, the young city of Chicago was blighted by disease, its growth hampered by its lack of a sewer system. In order to solve the city’s constant public health crises, a group of engineers concocted a plan that would be unthinkable today: physically lifting an entire city out of the muck. Twitter: Link Patreon: Link S…
 
The precocious wife of President Andrew Jackson's Secretary of War brings down a Cabinet, and nearly brings on a civil war. From, The White House’s Unruly Neighborhood: Crime, Scandal and Intrigue in the History of Lafayette Square: https://www.amazon.com/White-Houses-Unruly-Neighborhood-Lafayette-ebook/dp/B082ZVDCD7/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=…
 
In part 2 of our deep dive into The Hidden History of the Human Race by Michael Cremo and Richard Thompson, we finish up on the "cut bones" section of the book and move on to looking at stone tools found in exceedingly ancient geological contexts. Once again the authors give many examples of excellent finds of stone tools, bone implements, tool wor…
 
In this episode of Hidden Histories I have released an interview with Terry Watson that I conducted on 25 July 2013 as part of my research for the book Tartan Gangs and Paramilitaries. Sadly Terry died in December 2020 after a long illness. His family kindly gave me permission to use this interview for a podcast episode.In the interview Terry talks…
 
In this episode, I speak with author Ralph Keyes. Ralph's new book, The Hidden History of Coined Words, is an exuberant celebration of the malleability of the English language to meet our needs as speakers. Keyes discusses not only the stories behind word formation, but also how words influence social discourse. Click HERE to order Ralph's new book…
 
A story of bat caves, field notes and righting a wrong reputation! Merlin Tuttle has spent his career studying bats and proving why they are an incredibly vital part of the ecosystem. His research, books, lectures and National Geographic style photography have led to the knowledge that bats are not spooky but spectacular! Meet the hero who showed t…
 
Today on New Books in History, Mark A. Waddell, Associate professor of History, Philosophy & Sociology of Science in the Department of History at Michigan State University in beautiful East Lansing Michigan, talks about his recent book, Magic, Science, and Religion in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2021). From the recovery of anci…
 
Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations is one of the most popular philosophical works by sales to the public, while in academic philosophy he is considered somewhat of a philosophical lightweight. In Marcus Aurelius (Routledge, 2020), John Sellars argues that this academic perception mistakes the Meditations as a failed work of theoretical argument, when ins…
 
The Death of Asylum: Hidden Geographies of the Enforcement Archipelago (University of Minnesota Press, 2020) arrives at an extraordinarily consequential moment for the future of asylum protections. Even as more and more people around the world find themselves displaced and endangered by violent conflict, climate change, and material deprivation, th…
 
During the Cold War, cultural diplomacy was one way that the governments of the United States and the Soviet Union tried to cultivate goodwill towards their countries. As Anne Searcy explains in her book, Ballet in the Cold War: A Soviet-American Exchange (Oxford University Press, 2020), dance was part of this effort. She focuses on two tours of th…
 
Since President Nixon coined the phrase, the "War on Drugs" has presented an important change in how people view and discuss criminal justice practices and drug laws. The term evokes images of militarization, punishment, and violence, as well as combat and the potential for victory. It is no surprise then that questions such as whether the "War on …
 
The American Revolution has traditionally been presented as one of the thirteen colonies standing up to a tyrannical empire. Not only does this gloss over the involvement of the thousands of American colonists who remained loyal to the British crown, but it also leaves out the response of the colonies who were also affected by British policies yet …
 
The Last Platoon: A Novel of the Afghanistan War (Bombardier Books, 2020) is a riveting book of infantry ground combat. As a work of fiction it is superb, showing the personal drama, drives and experiences of regular Marines combined with the high ambitions and political maneuverings of the highest ranks, including the President and Secretary of De…
 
The Death of Asylum: Hidden Geographies of the Enforcement Archipelago (University of Minnesota Press, 2020) arrives at an extraordinarily consequential moment for the future of asylum protections. Even as more and more people around the world find themselves displaced and endangered by violent conflict, climate change, and material deprivation, th…
 
Don Isaac Abravanel (1437–1508) was an important forerunner of Jewish modernity. A merchant, banker, and court financier; a scholar versed in both Jewish and Christian writings; a preacher and exegete; and a prominent political actor in royal entourages and Jewish communities; Abravanel was one of the greatest leaders and thinkers of Iberian Jewry …
 
Imagine a rodeo rider atop a bucking bronco, hat in hand, straining to remain astride. Is the rider in your mind's eye white? Is the person male? Popular imaginings and high level, televised, professional rodeo circuits have created a stereotyped image of who rodeo is by and for, but it is far too limited an image, and one that does not reflect rea…
 
Churchill v Stalin examines the duel between the British and Russian leaders over what kind of Europe would emerge at the end of the war; a duel during which Roosevelt secretly intervened behind Churchill's back to decide the outcome The original documentary was licensed by DRG to Little Dot Studios. Podcast edit production by Ance Priedniece. You …
 
The field of US foreign-relations history is not what it used to be, and that’s a good thing. Earlier historians narrowly defined the field as diplomatic history­­ and kept vast swathes of the United States’ interactions with the world from being explored. In the middle of the 1990s, for example, even the very consideration of gender in the history…
 
The choices that churches make about their musical style do more than simply change the sounds one hears in their gatherings, but actually form certain kinds of community. So Monique M. Ingalls, Associate Professor of Music at Baylor University, argues in her book Singing the Congregation: How Contemporary Worship Music Forms Evangelical Community …
 
The election of Barack Obama propelled the idea of a post-racial United States, or that the country had moved beyond race as a defining feature of social difference and beyond racism as an everyday reality. Dr. Danielle Fuentes Morgan examines the ways in which African American comedians and cultural producers took aim at such claims through the le…
 
The Community Relations Service (CRS) came into being alongside the Voting Rights Act—as part of the Act itself. And this organization was integrated into the Voting Rights Act in 1964 because President Lyndon Johnson wanted it to be included in that landmark legislation, in part because Johnson, as an adept politician and negotiator, saw the impor…
 
We are joined by master jeweler Jeffrey Appling to discuss ultrasonic technology in the use of cutting and shaping stone. Jeffrey has been using an ultrasonic drilling and coring machine to cut, drill, and shape even the hardest of stones and jewels with ease. The bit of the machine does not spin, the ultrasonic vibration simply allows the bit to s…
 
Sasha Roseneil, Professor of Interdisciplinary Social Science at the Institute of Advanced Studies and Dean of the Faculty of Social and Historical Studies at University College London joins today to talk about the new book The Tenacity of the Couple-Norm: Intimate Citizenship Regimes in a Changing Europe, out 2020 with UCL Press. The Tenacity of t…
 
When journalist Rory Kress met Izzie, she didn’t think twice before bringing her home. She found the twelve-week-old wheaten terrier in a pet shop and was handed paperwork showing Izzie had been born in a USDA-licensed breeding facility—so she couldn’t be a puppy mill dog, right? But a few years later, as Rory embarked on her own difficult journey …
 
Operation White Rabbit: LSD, the DEA, and the Fate of the Acid King (Simon and Schuster, 2020) traces the rise and fall—and rise and fall again—of the psychedelic community through the life of the man known as the “Acid King”: William Leonard Pickard. Pickard was a scientific prodigy, a follower of Timothy Leary, a con artist, a womanizer, a man wh…
 
Today on the New Books in History, a channel on the New Books Network, we’re here today with Christopher Close, Associate Professor of History at St. Joseph’s University in the incomparable city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to talk about his latest book, State Formation and Shared Sovereignty: The Holy Roman Empire and the Dutch Republic, 1488- 1…
 
“Economics is the long-run driver” in the history of Europe’s monetary union, writes Richard Pomfret in the first of a new Cambridge Elements series on the Economics of European Integration: The Road to Monetary Union (Cambridge University Press, 2021). “Politics often determined the timing of the next step ... but it has not determined the directi…
 
Ramsey McGlazer's Old Schools: Modernism, Education, and the Critique of Progress (Fordham University Press, 2020), traces the ways in which a group of modernist cultural practitioners (thinkers, politicians, artists, poets, novelists, and filmmakers) across varied linguistic and cultural contexts ((Italian, English, Irish, and Brazilian) resisted …
 
The search for a historical Gilgamesh is filled with red herrings. As Mesopotamia's best loved epic hero, images of Gilgamesh are littered throughout the ruins of the ancient cities of the Tigris and Euphrates. Ancient documents produced by Kings looking to bolster their image would claim that Gilgamesh was their "friend and brother". But despite t…
 
The so-called “Peking Man” fossils are some of the first ancient human remains discovered in mainland Asia. So when they disappeared during World War II, it was called one of the worst disasters in the history of archaeology. Now some archeologists claim to have tracked them down. The only problem is they’re underneath a parking lot. Credits Host: …
 
Former Air Force Intelligence Specialist Mike Turber now admits he made up the story he told us in 2019 that the “Tic Tac” UAPs seen by the Navy off the coast of San Diego are incredible U.S. anti-gravity craft, including that he rode in one and Trump had one flown to North Korea to scare Kim Jong-Un! He says he fibbed as part of a plan to bring ou…
 
During the middle decades of the twentieth century, the production of America’s consumer culture was centralized in New York to an extent unparalleled in the history of the United States. Every day tens of thousands of writers, editors, artists, performers, technicians, and secretaries made advertisements, produced media content, and designed the s…
 
This episode features three interviews with organizers and scholars concerned with Asian migrant sex work: SWAN Vancouver (Alison Clancey and Kelly Go), Dr. Lily Wong, and Dr. Yuri Doolan. On March 16, 2021, Robert Aaron Long targeted three Atlanta-area spas and massage parlors and killed eight people: Delania Ashley Yuan González, Xiaojie Tan, Dao…
 
Paul Radin was one of the founding generation of American cultural anthropologists: A student of Franz Boas, and famed ethnographer of the Winnebago. Yet little is known about Radin's life. A leftist who was persecuted by the FBI and who lived for several years outside of the United States, and a bohemian who couldn't keep an academic job, there ar…
 
In this episode, we speak with Cheryl Woodruff Brooks, author of Washington was a cosmetic entrepreneur whose company turned her into one of of America's first black millionaires. She was founder and president of Apex Enterprises consisting of Apex Beauty Colleges, Apex Publishing Company, Apex News & Hair Company, Apex Laboratories and Apex Drug C…
 
In Millennials Killed the Video Star: MTV’s Transition to Reality Programming (Duke University Press, 2021), Dr. Amanda Ann Klein examines the historical, cultural, and industrial factors leading to MTV's shift away from music videos to reality programming in the early 2000s and 2010s. Drawing on interviews with industry workers from programs such …
 
"Antipsychiatry," Esalen, psychedelics, and DSM III: Radical challenges to psychiatry and the conventional treatment of mental health in the 1970s. The upheavals of the 1960s gave way to a decade of disruptions in the 1970s, and among the rattled fixtures of American society was mainstream psychiatry. A "Radical Caucus" formed within the psychiatri…
 
America and Canada both saw historic sports milestones in 1993. While the Dallas Cowboys and Chicago Bulls reigned supreme, the Toronto Blue Jays won a second consecutive World Series on a walk-off homer, and the Montreal Canadiens emerged as the last Canadian team to win a Stanley Cup. While stars like Michael Jordan, Wayne Gretzky and Joe Montana…
 
This week we talk to Professor Cheryl Cooky, co-author of the new study One and Done: The Eclipse of Women’s Televised Sports, 1989–2019. Cooky talks about the study’s methodology, the origins of the study, and some surprising findings from the report. We also have “Choice Words” about why Major League Baseball chose to move the All-Star Game from …
 
So by the early 1500s Portugal controlled the major ports along northern Mozambique and into modern day Kenya all the way up to Mombasa. However, they did not seek to take over the land so to speak – at least at first. The idea was to build fortified ports so that they could enhance trade with those inland without resorting to boots on the ground. …
 
Terri-Ann Russell’s struggle after the sudden death of her son is a compelling story of love lost followed by the most painful sorrow and ultimate triumph of hope over fear. It’s her story of despair that nearly drove her to suicide. It’s her son’s story of guiding and protecting his beloved mom from the afterlife as a living spiritual presence in …
 
Episode 107: Let’s take a ride through history while examining the state of American transit infrastructure, the lost streetcars of the past, and the 1940s corporate conspiracy that may have stripped transit from your city. Twitter: Link Patreon: Link Sources and Further Reading Report Card on America’s Infrastructure: Link Railroads in the Late 19…
 
In Warhol's Mother's Pantry: Art America and the Mom in Pop (Mad Creek Press, 2020), M.I. Devine introduces readers to a collection of 21st-century multi-genre essays inspired by Andy Warhol's mother, Julia, that provide a literary and cultural history of new pop humanism. "Here are Leonard Cohen’s last songs and Molly Bloom’s last words; Vampire W…
 
In Training for Catastrophe: Fictions of National Security After 9/11 (University of Minnesota Press, 2021), author Lindsay Thomas studies the relationship between fiction and U.S. national security — specifically, the instrumentalization of fiction in preparedness materials, in which fictional events are phrased not only as real, but as producing …
 
Education is thought to be the route out of poverty, but history disagrees. For generations, Americans have looked to education as the solution to economic disadvantage. Yet, although more people are earning degrees, the gap between rich and poor is widening. Cristina Groeger delves into the history of this seeming contradiction, explaining how edu…
 
What role did culture play in the British Empire? In Imperial Encore: The Cultural Project of the Late British Empire Caroline Ritter, an Assistant Professor of History at Texas State University, explores the importance of culture in maintaining Imperial domination, and then in supporting post-Imperial British influence. Using core case studies of …
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login