show episodes
 
There's never been a better time to understand what's going on in Asia. That's why we talk to the people who know it best. The Asia In-Depth podcast brings you conversations with the world's leading experts and thought-leaders on the politics, economics, and culture of Asia — and beyond. Subscribe today.
 
The World Unpacked is a biweekly foreign policy podcast, hosted by Laura Lucas Magnuson, that breaks down the hottest global issues of today with experts, journalists, and policymakers who can explain what is happening, why it matters, and where we go from here. Tune in to get smart on foreign policy.
 
Popular Front is an independent podcast that focuses on the niche details of modern warfare and under-reported conflict. If you want to know how suicide car bombs are built, which paramilitary factions are operating where, or what volunteer militias are fighting for, this podcast is for you. It's detailed, uncensored, and free from industry elitism. See more at www.popularfront.co
 
Take a step back from noisy political debates and tune in to rich conversations on India and the world. The Pragati Podcast is a weekly talkshow on public policy, economics and international relations. Science-geek-turned-policy-wonk Pavan Srinath talks to scholars and experts on everything from India's unique genetics to why China isn't really trying to take over the world. New episodes out every Thursday. The Pragati Podcast is the titular podcast of the online magazine Pragati, and has a ...
 
Want to learn more about China first-hand, from reporters on the ground? In every episode, we take a deep-dive into a specific topic, mixing independent reporting and exclusive interviews to bring you unique insights into an emerging potential superpower. Now, we’re featuring regular updates on the coronavirus pandemic from across the country. Brought to you by the South China Morning Post.
 
Intelligence Squared is the world’s leading forum for debate and intelligent discussion. Live and online we take you to the heart of the issues that matter, in the company of some of the world’s sharpest minds and most exciting orators. Join the debate at www.intelligencesquared.com and download our weekly podcasts every Tuesday and Friday. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared.
 
Each week, Foreign Policy’s editor in chief, Jonathan Tepperman, will recommend one podcast from around the world, interview the host, and play an excerpt. This curated show is designed to help listeners interested in the things we are—great stories, compelling interviews, and cogent analysis on international affairs—sort through the overwhelming variety of podcasts out there and find the best ones. And occasionally you’ll hear audio from our own newsroom. FP Playlist replaces our flagship p ...
 
The China Africa Project is a multimedia resource dedicated to exploring every aspect of China’s growing engagement with Africa. Through a combination of original content and curation of third-party material from across the Internet, the CAP’s objective is purely informational. None of the blog’s authors or producers have any vested interest in any Chinese or African position.
 
We live in a confusing time, bombarded every day with news from around the world that can be hard to follow, or fully understand. Let Worldly be your guide. Every Thursday, senior writer Zack Beauchamp, senior foreign editor Jennifer Williams, and staff defense writer Alex Ward give you the history and context you need to make sense of the moment and navigate the world around you. Produced by Vox and the Vox Media Podcast Network.
 
China 21 is produced by the 21st Century China Center at UC San Diego’s School of Global Policy and Strategy. We are a leading university-based think tank that produces scholarly research and informs policy discussions on China and U.S.-China relations. This podcast features expert voices, insights and stories about China’s economy, politics, society, and the implications for international affairs. Learn more at china.ucsd.edu
 
As I travel I have the chance to meet a host of very smart and accomplished people around the world. The objective of this podcast is for me to learn from them whether it is in business, investing, future and tech, or health. I welcome everyone to join my journey as we learn and grow together with this podcast.
 
The Democracy Works podcast seeks to answer that question by examining a different aspect of democratic life each week — from voting to criminal justice to the free press and everything in between. We interview experts who study democracy, as well as people who are out there doing the hard work of democracy day in and day out. The show’s name comes from Pennsylvania’s long tradition of iron and steel works — people coming together to build things greater than the sum of their parts. We belie ...
 
Welcome to Coexisting! Audio stories of those currently sheltering at home due to Coronavirus all over the world. Part information, part human story archive but mainly trying to get an uplifting bent on this insane situation we find ourselves in.We have people from from China, Hong Kong, Japan, Canada, United States Australia, UK, Portugal, Iceland, France, Italy and Taiwan so far and the list keeps growing.
 
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show series
 
“Imagine you live in a freewheeling city like New York or London – one of the world’s leading financial, educational, and cultural centres. Then imagine that one of the world’s most infamous authoritarian regimes makes direct control over your city, introducing secret police, warrant less surveillance and searches, massive repression and the arrest…
 
Virgin Hyperloop is the first company to conduct a test of its new hyperloop technology with human passengers. Sara Luchian was one of the two passengers on the first test ride earlier this month. And, the surging coronavirus pandemic has complicated the annual college student exodus for Thanksgiving. At The State University of New York system, kno…
 
Zoom has been the clear favorite to connect people during the pandemic. Hearing health advocates, however, say it hasn't connected everyone. One advocate explains her efforts to get Zoom's closed captioning out from behind a paywall. Also, the incoming Biden administration has signaled that it is willing to consider some form of student loan debt f…
 
Boris Johnson is facing a growing rebellion over plans to introduce a tougher tier system after lockdown ends in England, and Rishi Sunak isn't denying reports he could freeze pay for millions of public sector workers. Liberal Democrat Treasury spokesperson Christine Jardine tells Bloomberg Westminster's Roger Hearing and Sebastian Salek that takin…
 
The fallout from the explosive Brereton report into alleged war crimes by Australian special forces in Afghanistan continues; The deadly conflict in Ethiopia's Tigray region continues to spiral, sparking concerns for the wider region; Professor Megan Davis talks about the winding road to reconciliation in the 20 years since the Bridge Walk.…
 
Dawn Carpenter is the creator and host of What Does It Profit? - a podcast that explores how we can reconcile capitalism’s demand for profit with the long term well-being of people and the planet, She is a former investment banker who had a mid-career pivot to studying applied ethics, the nature work, and the responsibilities of wealth. Dawn and Je…
 
Common morality has been the touchstone of medical ethics since the publication of Beauchamp and Childress's Principles of Biomedical Ethics in 1979. Rosamond Rhodes challenges this dominant view by presenting an original and novel account of the ethics of medicine, one deeply rooted in the actual experience of medical professionals. She argues tha…
 
In 1930s Bucharest, some of the country's most brilliant young intellectuals converged to form the Criterion Association. Bound by friendship and the dream of a new, modern Romania, their members included historian Mircea Eliade, critic Petru Comarnescu, Jewish playwright Mihail Sebastian and a host of other philosophers and artists. Together, they…
 
For centuries Southeast Asia has enjoyed a relatively pleasant relationship with China, its massive neighbor to the north. While Chinese merchants and laborers were common throughout the region, with exception of a 1,000-year occupation of northern Vietnam, China has rarely attempted to exercise control over Southeast Asia. However, in the past two…
 
King of Britain for sixty years and the last king of what would become the United States, George III inspired both hatred and loyalty and is now best known for two reasons: as a villainous tyrant for America's Founding Fathers, and for his madness, both of which have been portrayed on stage and screen. In George III: Madness and Majesty (Penguin, 2…
 
Social and Conceptual Issues in Astrobiology (Oxford University Press, 2020) focuses on the emerging scientific discipline of astrobiology, exploring many of the humanistic issues this multidisciplinary field is generating. Despite there being myriad scientific questions that astrobiologists have only begun to address, this is not a purely scientif…
 
The Icelandic mappae mundi were a series of maps produced in the late medieval period (c. 1225 - c. 1400) that bore witness to fundamental changes in the landscape of vernacular literary culture, scientific thinking and regional geopolitics. In The Mappae Mundi of Medieval Iceland (D.S. Brewer, 2020), Dale Kedwards explores the plethora of meanings…
 
Michael Mascarenhas's book Lessons in Environmental Justice: From Civil Rights to Black Lives Matter and Idle No More (Sage, 2020) provides an entry point to the field by bringing together the works of individuals who are creating a new and vibrant wave of environmental justice scholarship. methodology, and activism. The 18 essays in this collectio…
 
In this far-ranging and erudite exploration of the South Asian past, Sumit Guha discusses the shaping of social and historical memory in world-historical context. He presents memory as the result of both remembering and forgetting and of the preservation, recovery, and decay of records. By describing how these processes work through sociopolitical …
 
The United States experienced race-baiting, polarization, executive overreach, and inequality before the presidency of Donald Trump. Does that political history demonstrate resilience – or vulnerability? Suzanne Mettler (John L. Senior Professor of American Institutions in the Government department, Cornell University) and Robert C. Lieberman (Krie…
 
For centuries Southeast Asia has enjoyed a relatively pleasant relationship with China, its massive neighbor to the north. While Chinese merchants and laborers were common throughout the region, with exception of a 1,000-year occupation of northern Vietnam, China has rarely attempted to exercise control over Southeast Asia. However, in the past two…
 
Ellen Lamont's new book The Mating Game: How Gender Still Shapes How We Date (University of California Press, 2020) offers an in-depth analysis of how gender shapes dating practices. Despite enormous changes in patterns of dating and courtship in twenty-first-century America, contemporary understandings of romance and intimacy remain firmly rooted …
 
The Emergence of the Gulf States: Studies in Modern History (Bloomsbury, 2016) offers an overview of the history of Saudi Arabia and the five Persian/Arabian Gulf states that emerged from British rule between 1961 and 1971--including Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates. The book synthesized the works of many academics, all ex…
 
This is a conversation with Jonathan McIntosh who runs the Pop Culture Detective Agency, the video essay series focusing on the intersections of masculinity, politics and entertainment. He was also a producer and co-writer on the Tropes vs. Women in Video Games YouTube video series created and hosted by Anita Sarkeesian. You don't have to watch his…
 
This is a bittersweet moment in the global fight against the Covid pandemic. Joy that at least two vaccine trials have produced extremely promising results is tempered by the continued spread of the disease across much of the world. To put it bluntly, the global containment effort has had limited success. Stephen Sackur speaks to Dr David Nabarro, …
 
Seven months after 22 people were killed in a shooting rampage that started in Portapique, N.S., an investigation by CBC's The Fifth Estate reveals new details of that night, and what law enforcement knew. We talk to Gillian Findlay, a host on The Fifth Estate, about the findings, and Nick Beaton, whose wife, Kristen Beaton, was killed that night i…
 
The politics of identity have played center stage in many political debates in the last few years, and is often seen somewhat pejoratively as an epiphenomenal manifestation of the dynamics of capitalism. Some scholars, however, see this as a reductive mistake, not just for any attempt to organize against capitalism, but also as part of a mistaken u…
 
Airdate November 15, 2020: Countries in the north are seeing surges as the winter sets in. How bad will it get? How do the vaccines change the calculus? Fareed talks to Bill Gates about the state of the pandemic. Then, America's role on the world stage—what has it become under the Trump administration? And, how will the next presidency re-shape it?…
 
梁錦祥節目 影碟情報室 201121 主持 梁錦祥 紀陶 主題 金馬獎頒獎,波蘭斯基新片 MyRadio Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/myradiohk MyRadio月費計劃詳情及常見問題 http://myradio.hk/podcast/?page_id=8990 p1 of 4 YouTube: https://youtu.be/nAVr9xJirb4 MP3: http://www.archive.org/download/201121kmzass/sp201121a.mp3By 梁錦祥節目 | MyRadio.hk
 
梁錦祥節目 影碟情報室 201121 主持 梁錦祥 紀陶 主題 金馬獎頒獎,波蘭斯基新片 MyRadio Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/myradiohk MyRadio月費計劃詳情及常見問題 http://myradio.hk/podcast/?page_id=8990 p2 of 4 YouTube: https://youtu.be/Um1Tn8pHJ90 MP3: http://www.archive.org/download/201121kmzass/sp201121b.mp3By 梁錦祥節目 | MyRadio.hk
 
梁錦祥節目 影碟情報室 201121 主持 梁錦祥 紀陶 主題 金馬獎頒獎,波蘭斯基新片 MyRadio Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/myradiohk MyRadio月費計劃詳情及常見問題 http://myradio.hk/podcast/?page_id=8990 p3 of 4 YouTube: https://youtu.be/14pLBmdQrLE MP3: http://www.archive.org/download/201121kmzass/sp201121c.mp3By 梁錦祥節目 | MyRadio.hk
 
梁錦祥節目 影碟情報室 201121 主持 梁錦祥 紀陶 主題 金馬獎頒獎,波蘭斯基新片 MyRadio Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/myradiohk MyRadio月費計劃詳情及常見問題 http://myradio.hk/podcast/?page_id=8990 p4 of 4 YouTube: https://youtu.be/nL2aqvGgPuI MP3: http://www.archive.org/download/201121kmzass/sp201121d.mp3By 梁錦祥節目 | MyRadio.hk
 
In the United States, President Trump still hasn’t conceded that he has lost the election. His campaign is doubling down making claims of voter fraud. But without evidence. Meanwhile, the election winner, Joe Biden, is preparing to become president while being denied access to the briefings he is entitled to as President-elect, as Anthony Zurcher r…
 
In his bid to reset the UK government's image, Boris Johnson announced a 10-point plan for a 'green recovery' costing billions of pounds. Will it do enough to tackle climate change and does it risk alienating Johnson's 'Red Wall' supporters? The prime minister has also pledged the biggest investment in defence since the end of the cold war. But is …
 
As the busy winter lettuce season hits full swing in Yuma, Arizona, migrant workers and farmers are trying to avoid a COVID-19 outbreak. We visit the border region, where 90% of the country's winter lettuce crop is grown. Also, the Food and Drug Administration greenlighted a new at-home coronavirus test. The prescription-only kit will cost under $5…
 
Civil rights lawyer Nora Benavidez joins us to discuss a growing number of states where lawmakers are passing or proposing laws to criminalize protest activity. And, climate activists have asked the incoming Biden administration not to hire anyone with ties to the oil and gas industries. Already they've been disappointed by his hiring of Rep. Cedri…
 
This week Anthony Scaramucci, the former Director of Communications in President Donald Trump’s White House, and Danielle Pletka, former Vice President at the American Enterprise Institute, debate the Republican Party's response to the US election and the future of America. The podcast was hosted by Jonathan Freedland, columnist for the Guardian an…
 
Boris Johnson ruffled a few feathers this week, saying devolution had been "Tony Blair's biggest mistake" and a "disaster" in Scotland. So how successful has the two-decade transfer of power been? Akash Paun, senior fellow at the Institute for Government tells Bloomberg Westminster's Sebastian Salek and Caroline Hepker it's broadly gone well, but t…
 
The technology stack, either in a company or a country, is comprised of the different technology layers that together form a digital communications ecosystem. And in places like East Africa, Chinese technology is indispensable up and down the stack -- everything from the internet cables that deliver connectivity to the networks that route all of th…
 
Zhuangzi and the Becoming of Nothingness (SUNY Press, 2018) offers a radical rereading of the Daoist classic Zhuangzi by bringing to light the role of nothingness in grounding the cosmological and metaphysical aspects of its thought. Through a careful analysis of the text and its appended commentaries, David Chai reveals not only how nothingness ph…
 
Greater interest in what is happening in the northwestern Chinese region of Xinjiang in recent years has generated a proportional need for context, and especially insights into the politics and policies being enacted there and how these interface with local perspectives. For this reason and many others, David Tobin’s Securing China's Northwest Fron…
 
Behind the braided wigs, buckskins, and excess bronzer that typified the mid-century "filmic Indian" lies a far richer, deeper history of Indigenous labor, survival, and agency. This history takes center stage in historian Liza Black's new book, Picturing Indians: Native Americans in Film, 1941-1960 (University of Nebraska Press, 2020), which looks…
 
Why did the Founding Fathers fail to include blacks and Indians in their cherished proposition that “all men are created equal”? Racism is the usual answer. Yet Nicholas Guyatt argues in Bind Us Apart: How Enlightened Americans Invented Racial Segregation (Basic Books, 2016) that white liberals from the founding to the Civil War were not confident …
 
How did public demand shape education in the 20th century? In The Crisis of the Meritocracy: Britain’s Transition to Mass Education since the Second World War (Oxford UP, 2020), Peter Mandler, Professor of Modern Cultural History at the University of Cambridge, charts the history of schools, colleges, and universities. The book charts the tension b…
 
“Awareness of the EU's undeniable past and present importance can - and has - led to complacency and hubris. There is nothing inevitable about European integration". So writes Mark Gilbert in European Integration: A Political History (Rowman and Littlefield, 2020), a compact, narrative history of the European Communities and the European Union pitc…
 
Listen to this interview of Shyam Sharma, author of Writing Support for International Graduate Students: Enhancing Transition and Success (Routledge, 2020). We talk about international students and rhetoric, international students and confidence, international students and community-based programming, and vision. Interviewer : "Could you give an ex…
 
When are borders justified? Who has a right to control them? Where should they be drawn? Today people think of borders as an island's shores. Just as beaches delimit a castaway's realm, so borders define the edges of a territory, occupied by a unified people, to whom the land legitimately belongs. Hence a territory is legitimate only if it belongs …
 
Singapore’s history has generally been represented through a linear, upward trajectory “from Third World to the First,” in the words of the postcolonial state’s founding father Lee Kuan Yew. In his book Singapore: A Modern History (Bloomsbury, 2020), Michael D. Barr synthesizes a story that complicates this progress narrative and critiques the foun…
 
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