show episodes
 
Welcome to the Ghibliotheque, the podcast that leafs through the library of films from the world’s greatest animation studio, Studio Ghibli. Michael Leader (Little White Lies, Sight & Sound), an avowed Ghibli fanatic, is sitting down with Jake Cunningham (The Independent, BFI), who has never seen any of the Studio’s work before. Together they'll be looking at the history behind Ghibli's films (including Spirited Away, My Neighbour Totoro and Princess Mononoke), getting a critical perspective ...
 
Dust Busters is your weekly podcast companion through the world of HBO and the BBC's adaptation of Philip Pullman's hugely popular fantasy novels His Dark Materials. After each episode airs, superfan Jake Cunningham (Ghibliotheque, Little White Lies) and His Dark Materials novice Louisa Maycock (Girls on Tops) discuss the world, and worlds, of His Dark Materials. Together, they'll be your guides through Lyra's World, Will's World and the mysterious Cittàgazze; and of course, trying to figure ...
 
The Commonwealth Club of California is the nation's largest public affairs forum. The nonpartisan and nonprofit Club produces and distributes programs featuring diverse viewpoints from thought leaders on important topics. The Club's weekly radio broadcast — the oldest in the U.S., since 1924 — is carried on hundreds of stations. Our website features audio and video of our programs. This podcast feed is usually updated multiple times each week.
 
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show series
 
Join us for a virtual discussion with Theodore Johnson, who begins his book When the Stars Begin to Fall by declaring that “Racism is an existential threat to America.” Johnson argues that our society's continuing racism not only contradicts the American Promise enshrined in our Constitution that all men and women are inherently equal, but also con…
 
After the Cold War, America sought to protect as many democracies as possible and stamp out any threat of authoritarianism around the world. Now, 30 years after the breakup of the Soviet Union, political scientists have observed a global rise in authoritarian governments—even in America itself. After the 2016 election of President Donald Trump, Ben…
 
Transportation policymakers face two overlapping, once-in-a-generation opportunities: electrifying the nation’s vehicle fleet and re-establishing a stable source of federal and state revenue for transportation. As states and the Biden administration begin a push to rapidly electrify the U.S. fleet for climate reasons, policymakers are under increas…
 
On today’s show, we begin our series NBA Draft prospect film reviews for the pod. Will DeBerg of the University of St. Thomas is again joining me in this venture, as he did last summer. And to start off the series, and on the day of the NBA Draft lottery, Will and I take a look at the top three prospects in 2021 Draft class, Cade Cunningham, Evan M…
 
Dating in the digital age has never been more complicated. Nancy Jo Sales, a New York Times-bestselling author and journalist, found herself at the center of the addictive and corporate world of online dating after she downloaded Tinder. She wasn’t alone; in a 2015 Vanity Fair article, Sales shared stories from millennials who use dating apps on a …
 
CNN’s Jake Tapper is one of the most respected people in news today. As CNN’s chief Washington anchor and co-host of “State of the Union,” Tapper has sat down with presidents, covered inaugurations, and continues to interview senators, dignitaries and newsmakers week in and week out. In his new novel The Devil May Dance, Tapper continues the story …
 
This week in our Chat Returns miniseries, we are joined by Elizabeth Ito, creator of the delightful Netflix animated series City of Ghosts, which chronicles the adventures of the Ghost Club as they discover the histories of various vibrant Los Angeles neighbourhoods. Keep an eye out for weekly episodes in our Chat Returns miniseries - featuring con…
 
On today’s show, Jake Fischer of Bleacher Report joins to highlight the many Timberwolves-related anecdotes from his new book “Built To Lose: How The NBA’s Tanking Era Changed The League Forever”. The ties from the Philadelphia 76ers to the Houston Rockets and even to the acquisition of Andrew Wiggins and selection of Karl-Anthony Towns are abundan…
 
From activism to political campaigns to corporate advertising, the power of music and images is undeniable. So how can the arts inspire and advance the climate conversation? For more than three decades, Shepard Fairey’s work has provoked thought and controversy in the art and political spheres. Now, with a public weary of climate charts and apocaly…
 
Best-selling author Mark Shaw returns to The Commonwealth Club to discuss his latest book, Collateral Damage, in his ongoing investigative research into the connections between the mysterious deaths of motion picture screen siren Marilyn Monroe, President John F. Kennedy, and "What’s My Line?" TV star and crack investigative reporter Dorothy Kilgal…
 
In response to high risks of suicide, substance abuse, depression and victimization among LGBTQ adolescents, new emphasis is being placed upon the role that family support plays in reducing LGBTQ children's risks and strengthening their families. in May, the Family Acceptance Project (FAP) at San Francisco State University released a series of eigh…
 
Britt Robson of The Athletic joins the pod for a second time this week, where on this episode we discuss the recent Minnesota Timberwolves news and notes since the season ended one month ago. Topics discussed include: Iowa Wolves coach Sam Newman-Beck ousted as Chris Finch and Gersson Rosas begin to build out a new coaching staff from top to bottom…
 
On today’s show, Britt Robson of The Athletic joins the show to discuss a wide open NBA playoff field, with three series tied at 2-2 and the Phoenix Suns ascending to the conference finals. We discuss: Chris Paul’s dominance and the Suns exploding into championship contention The Nets title odds through a bundle of injuries + what is left to be des…
 
President Abraham Lincoln announced the end of slavery in 1862, but it wasn’t until two and a half years later on June 19, 1865, that the news finally reached enslaved people in Texas. Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and Texas native Annette Gordon-Reed chronicles the country’s long road to Juneteenth, recounting both its origins in Texas and the …
 
The way people conceptualize mental illness, and how they talk about it, differs around the world. A new book—Nobody's Normal, by George Washington University Professor of Anthropology Roy Richard Grinker—examines the ways in which culture and historical contexts have shaped our beliefs, stigma and social norms around mental health. In conversation…
 
The global COVID-19 pandemic has revealed more clearly the huge health and health-care disparities between groups that are closely linked with social, economic and/or environmental disadvantage. Disparities occur across many dimensions, including race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, age, location, gender, disability status, and sexual orientation—…
 
Understanding the tragic issue of slavery and its ongoing historical impact on the country has been a critical part of America's recent reckoning on race. The Atlantic's Clint Smith has been one of the country's leading writers on this essential but complex topic for the past several years. In one of the most anticipated books of the year, How the …
 
The Colorado River supplies water to more than 40 million people across seven states. Lake Mead has fallen to its lowest level since it was filled in the 1930s, which could trigger the first stage of real water cutbacks. For years, “much of the discussion in the Colorado River Basin has been who gets the next drop,” says journalist Luke Runyon. “Th…
 
This week, the Chat Returns and so does the Cartoon Salooniverse, as Michael and Jake speak with Will Collins, co-writer of both Song of the Sea and Wolfwalkers. Down the line from Ireland, Will tells Michael and Jake about his relationship with the films of Studio Ghibli and his ongoing collaboration with Cartoon Saloon filmmakers Tomm Moore and R…
 
Dr. Jen Gunter, the outspoken and digitally savvy Bay Area doctor who has been called "the world's most famous gynecologist" returns to The Commonwealth Club for what should be a fun discussion on her new book, The Menopause Manifesto, with television comedian Samantha Bee. Dr. Gunter, who has made waves with her fierce advocacy of women's health, …
 
One of President Biden’s first acts in office was to extend the New START Treaty with Russia. Concluded in 2010, the treaty cut the strategic nuclear arsenals of the United States and Russia in half. It was set to expire on February 5, 2021, and is now in force for another five years. That treaty—which is holding back a new nuclear arms race betwee…
 
Brendan Hedtke of CanisHoopus joins the pod today to discuss the potential paths for the Timberwolves to take this summer to become a respectable defense next season. What can Gersson Rosas add to this roster and what can Chris Finch adjust to make the Wolves’ defense good enough to make the playoffs? We discuss: The Wolves history of being a below…
 
The Nobel laureate Otto Warburg was widely regarded in his day as one of the most important biochemists of the 20th century. As a Jewish homosexual living openly with his male partner, Warburg represented all that the Third Reich abhorred. Yet Hitler and his top advisors dreaded cancer, and protected Warburg in the hope that he could cure it. Apple…
 
Britt Robson of The Athletic again joins the show. This time to discuss the now set, eight-team field for the second round of the playoffs. We spend about twenty minutes on all four of the second round series, in this order: Bucks-Nets, Nuggets-Suns, Clippers-Jazz, Sixers-Hawks. Topics discussed include: Our announcement of a live show on NBA Draft…
 
Over the last few decades, San Francisco has experienced radical changes with the influence of Silicon Valley, tech companies and more. Countless articles, blogs and even movies have tried to capture the complex nature of what San Francisco has become, a place millions of people have loved to call home, and yet are compelled to consider leaving. In…
 
Join us for a virtual discussion, live-streamed direct from Berlin, Germany, with Heino Falcke, the German astrophysicist, about his research into the nature of black holes. His new book A Light in the Darkness is the story of how the first photographic evidence of black holes was achieved by Falcke in April 2019, and what its significance for huma…
 
In 1968, San Francisco made history when, as a result of the student strike at San Francisco State University, the country’s first ethnic studies department was born. Over the years, community advocates have continued to find inadequacies in educational programs for students, citing a lack of inclusion of instructional materials for the teaching of…
 
Disasters are inherently inevitable in life. We cannot predict the next earthquake, wildfire, financial crisis, war or pandemic, but we can predict how to handle each situation better. Unexpected calamities have happened all throughout human history, yet even in the 21st century we are ill-prepared to recover from them. In the new book Doom: The Po…
 
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