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Best James Marshall podcasts we could find (updated August 2020)
Best James Marshall podcasts we could find
Updated August 2020
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Want to drop fat by eating ridiculously well and exercising less? Whether you’re into Intermittent Fasting, Keto, Paleo, Plant-Based, Wild, Carnivore or completely clueless, we’re here to help you eat right, train smarter, and transform your body and mind to be your absolute best. This family-friendly show is free of outside advertising for your listening pleasure. Winner of 4 awards and #1 in Health in 8+ countries.
 
The Podcast from Australia for Science and Reason. Join Richard Saunders and his team of reporters for your weekly dose of skeptical news and interviews, reports and comments. Past guests have included, James Randi, Stephen Fry, Tim Minchin, Eugenie Scott, Dr Phil Plait, Michael Marshall, Dr Steve Novella, Dr Pamela Gay, Jon Ronson, Dr Ben Goldacre, Simon Singh, Prof. Richard Wiseman, Dick Smith, Banachek, Prof. Chris French, George Hrab, Tim Ferguson, Dr Paul Willis and many, many more. Fea ...
 
Breakthrough Success is the podcast for entrepreneurs who are looking for digital marketing strategies, personal development, and actionable tactics to grow their businesses. We cover the different ways to gain visibility and make money through your work...including podcasting, content marketing, blogging, productivity, self-publishing, coaching, virtual summits, affiliate marketing, and more. Learn how to transform your business into the successful enterprise you know it can be. Guests incl ...
 
Songwriter James Yorkston and Record Label Owner / Brewer Stephen Marshall sitting somewhere in the East Neuk of Fife, Scotland, discussing music, playing records of no fixed abode and vaguely trying to keep it as close to 46.30 as possible. Here's James - http://www.jamesyorkston.co.uk/ And here's Stephen - https://triassictusk.bandcamp.com Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/46-30/support
 
On "The Pat McAfee Show," Pat McAfee and his friends deliver one of a kind opinions that won't be heard anywhere else. Pat's a recently retired NFL All-Pro who has zero filter. A common man who has experience in an extremely uncommon professional athlete lifestyle is a beautiful concoction of hilarity for the average Joe. Both relatable and ridiculous, "The Pat McAfee Show" promises to inform, intrigue, and entertain. Thanks for listening. Cheers
 
Forever And A Day follows the trials and tribulations of the Harper, Bennett, and Marshall families, as they face life’s complexities head-on in the fictional town of Augustus, Illinois. The Harpers and Bennetts are butting heads, as the gubernatorial race in Illinois heats up; and brings with it multiple twists and turns that could end up destroying both families! Meanwhile, the Marshalls face new challenges, as they try to continue their almost outdated formula of how to run their long-sta ...
 
The BMJ is an international peer reviewed medical journal and a fully “online first” publication. The BMJ’s vision is to be the world’s most influential and widely read medical journal. Our mission is to lead the debate on health and to engage, inform, and stimulate doctors, researchers, and other health professionals in ways that will improve outcomes for patients. We aim to help doctors to make better decisions.
 
Join us every month as we speak with recently published or well established authors, gleaning insights and real tips from writers following their process from beginning to write, editing and proof reading, to finding an agent and publisher and finally finding an audience. Past guests include Joyce Carol-Oates, E.L James, John Safran, and Charlotte Wood.Twitter @_on_writing
 
A truly unique show not like the others, if you want to be entertained & informed you've found a home. Long-form interviews with all walks of life, popular names and very unpopular names manifest from the ether. For Bonus content visit PATREON.COM/MICHAELDECON @michaeldecon Live Every Saturday night at 5:30 PM PST - 8:30 PM EST http://www.youtube.com/c/EndOfDays1 http://www.michaeldecon.com CALL-IN 760-332-8724
 
Director Rob Marshall (Chicago) and actor James Corden (Begin Again) discusses their latest film. Adapted from the Sondheim and Lapine musical, Into the Woods is a modern twist on several beloved Brothers Grimm fairy tales all tied together by an original story of a baker and his wife cursed by a witch. Hosted by Edith Bowman at the Apple Store, Regent Street in London.
 
Each episode of Today in Canadian History contains an interview with a Canadian professor, journalist, author, or “everyday” historian and focuses on a unique event or moment that took place on that day in Canadian history. Today in Canadian History presents Canada’s past in a unique and accessible manner. The series is designed to be a first step to learning more about our past. We would like to remind Canadians not just about what makes our country great, but what makes it complicated, bea ...
 
Art Grind is a podcast for and about artists, art lovers and art professionals. It is a social practice of giving back to the art community of which we are a part and explores the process, content, concept and motivation behind art making of both established and emerging artists and the people who bring that art to a wider audience. We are artists ourselves and wear many hats, including curation, art writing and art teaching. We share a passion for authentic and skilled art making, be it tra ...
 
The Help & Hope audio testimonies addresses life's darkest circumstances that are often difficult to discuss, yet need to be faced as we help one another walk by faith. These are the real-life testimonies of people who have walked through these experiences and have found their strength in Christ.
 
AviaDev Insight is the first podcast dedicated to the African aviation industry. We bring prominent industry voices to the table to establish the "ground truth" in an informal and candid fashion. The podcast was created by Jon Howell, Founder and Managing Director of AviaDev Africa, Africa's premier event dedicated to developing air connectivity to, from and within the African continent
 
Light hearted, entertaining and amusing as it takes on contemporary American life would best describe The Wit and Humor of America by Marshall Pinckney Wilder whish is a compilation of humorous passages from various works of American literature. Ranging from Harriet Beecher Stowe's Dinah's Kitchen to Dislikes by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Little Orphint Annie by James Whitcomb Riley, The Auto Rubaiyat by Reginald Wright Kauffman, Garden Ethics by Charles Dudley Warner and Morris and the Honorabl ...
 
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show series
 
This sweeping new history recognizes that the Civil War was not just a military conflict but also a moment of profound transformation in Americans' relationship to the natural world. To be sure, environmental factors such as topography and weather powerfully shaped the outcomes of battles and campaigns, and the war could not have been fought withou…
 
Sixteen athletes from eleven sports arenas. Each chapter tells a different story, as each superstar shares the habit that helped them accomplish their goals and reach the pinnacle of their profession. Sports fanatic or not. Guaranteed to tap into your athletic edge, Jeremy Bhandari's Trust the Grind: How World-Class Athletes Got to the Top (Mango P…
 
As we enter the third decade of the 21st century, American nuclear policy continues to be influenced by the legacies of the Cold War. Nuclear policies remain focused on easily identifiable threats, including China or Russia, and how the United States would respond in the event of a first strike against the homeland. In their new book, The Button: T…
 
The beginning of the modern contraceptive era began in 1882, when Dr. Aletta Jacobs opened the first birth control clinic in Amsterdam. The founding of this facility, and the clinical provision of contraception that it enabled, marked the moment when physicians started to take the prevention of pregnancy seriously as a medical concern. In Contracep…
 
Lady Cecily Kay has just returned to England when she encounters Sir Barnaby Mayne. It’s 1703, Queen Anne is on the throne, and London’s coffee houses are buzzing with discussions of everything from science and philosophy to monsters and magic. Of course, Cecily has no plans to join the ongoing conversations; coffee houses bar the door to female vi…
 
Two prominent Israeli liberals argue that for the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians to end with peace, Palestinians must come to terms with the fact that there will be no "right of return." In 1948, seven hundred thousand Palestinians were forced out of their homes by the first Arab-Israeli War. More than seventy years later, most of the…
 
In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, we’re hearing an awful lot about the fraught relationship between science and media. In his book, News from Mars: Mass Media and the Forging of a New Astronomy, 1860-1910 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019), historian of science Joshua Nall shows us that a blurry boundary between science and journalism was …
 
Professor David Tavárez’s edited volume, Words & Worlds Turned Around: Indigenous Christianities in Colonial Latin America (Boulder: University of Colorado Press, 2017), is a collection of eleven essays from historians and anthropologists grappling with the big questions of the Christianization of Mexico after the Spanish Conquest and using sources…
 
In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, we’re hearing an awful lot about the fraught relationship between science and media. In his book, News from Mars: Mass Media and the Forging of a New Astronomy, 1860-1910 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019), historian of science Joshua Nall shows us that a blurry boundary between science and journalism was …
 
For most Americans, the war the United States waged in the Pacific in the Second World War was one fought primarily by the Navy and the Marine Corps. As John C. McManus demonstrates in Fire and Fortitude: The US Army in the Pacific War, 1941-1943 (Dutton Caliber), however, this obscures the considerable role played by the soldiers of the United Sta…
 
Professor David Tavárez’s edited volume, Words & Worlds Turned Around: Indigenous Christianities in Colonial Latin America (Boulder: University of Colorado Press, 2017), is a collection of eleven essays from historians and anthropologists grappling with the big questions of the Christianization of Mexico after the Spanish Conquest and using sources…
 
In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, we’re hearing an awful lot about the fraught relationship between science and media. In his book, News from Mars: Mass Media and the Forging of a New Astronomy, 1860-1910 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019), historian of science Joshua Nall shows us that a blurry boundary between science and journalism was …
 
Jeff Gothelf helps organizations build better products and executives build the cultures that build better products. He is the co-author of distinguished, award winning books, and the upcoming book Forever Employable. He works as a coach, consultant and keynote speaker helping companies bridge the gaps between business agility, digital transformati…
 
Despite the devastation caused by the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and 60-foot tsunami that struck Japan in 2011, some 96% of those living and working in the most disaster-stricken region of Tōhoku made it through. Smaller earthquakes and tsunamis have killed far more people in nearby China and India. What accounts for the exceptionally high survival r…
 
“The most interesting women in the world!” That’s how Claire Robertson describes African women, and it’s hard to disagree with her after reading Holding the World Together: African Women in Changing Perspective (University of Wisconsin Press, 2019), co-edited with Nwando Achebe. In 16 chapters, 19 contributors explore everything from issues of repr…
 
In 2009, a novel was released in Norway with a fairly simple premise; the author would simply write about himself, his life and his attempts to write. The autobiographical novel would be the first in a 6-volume series that would eventually total over 3,500 pages written in just 3 short years. The frenzied pace at which it was produced would only be…
 
It is often said that bioethics emerged from theology in the 1960s, and that since then it has grown into a secular enterprise, yielding to other disciplines and professions such as philosophy and law. During the 1970s and 1980s, a kind of secularism in biomedicine and related areas was encouraged by the need for a neutral language that could provi…
 
Beginning in the 1950s, a group of academics, businesspeople, and politicians set out on an ambitious project to remake North Carolina’s low-wage economy. They pitched the universities of Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill as the kernel of a tech hub, Research Triangle Park, which would lure a new class of highly educated workers. In the process, the…
 
In this episode, I talk with Dr. Leah Zani, a public anthropologist and poet based in California, about her truly wonderful book Bomb Children: Life in the Former Battlefields of Laos (Duke University Press, 2019). Her research takes place half a century after the CIA’s Secret War in Laos – the largest bombing campaign in history, which rendered La…
 
Despite the devastation caused by the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and 60-foot tsunami that struck Japan in 2011, some 96% of those living and working in the most disaster-stricken region of Tōhoku made it through. Smaller earthquakes and tsunamis have killed far more people in nearby China and India. What accounts for the exceptionally high survival r…
 
Nozomi Naoi’s Yumeji Modern: Designing the Everyday in Twentieth-Century Japan (University of Washington Press, 2020) is the first book-length English-language study of one of Japan’s iconic twentieth-century artists, Takehisa Yumeji (1884–1934). While he is most famous for portraits of beautiful women and stylish graphic design―which remain enormo…
 
Under dictatorship in Argentina, sex and sexuality were regulated to the point where sex education, explicit images, and even suggestive material were prohibited. With the return to democracy in 1983, Argentines experienced new freedoms, including sexual freedoms. The explosion of the availability and ubiquity of sexual material became known as the…
 
What were some of the major transformations taking place for Muslim communities in the Russian Empire of the eighteenth century? How did the introduction of a state-backed structure for Muslim religious institutions alter Islamic religious authority in the empire? And who exactly was Abu Nasr Qursawi and what was his reformist project to grapple wi…
 
Under dictatorship in Argentina, sex and sexuality were regulated to the point where sex education, explicit images, and even suggestive material were prohibited. With the return to democracy in 1983, Argentines experienced new freedoms, including sexual freedoms. The explosion of the availability and ubiquity of sexual material became known as the…
 
Popular culture helps shape how audiences imagine Biblical personalities in our contemporary moment. For many, Warner Sallman’s portrait of Jesus fixes him as white, others envision Moses as Charlton Heston because of Cecil B. DeMille’s film, The Ten Commandments, and the Jezebel stereotype is more well known than the Biblical figure. This merging …
 
Mormonism's founder, Joseph Smith, claimed to have translated ancient scriptures. He dictated an American Bible from metal plates reportedly buried by ancient Jews in a nearby hill, and produced an Egyptian "Book of Abraham" derived from funerary papyri he extracted from a collection of mummies he bought from a traveling showman. In addition, he re…
 
In Breakaway Americas: The Unmanifest Future of Jacksonian America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2020), Thomas Richards Jr., a history teacher at Springside Chestnut Hill Academy, argues that the map of North America was not preordained. Richards uses the Republic of Texas, the 1830s Patriot War, the Mormon exodus, and several other examples fro…
 
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