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Best Military History podcasts we could find (updated July 2020)
Best Military History podcasts we could find
Updated July 2020
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Each week, the International Spy Museum will offer a new SpyCast featuring interviews and programs with ex-spies, intelligence experts, and espionage scholars. The SpyCast is hosted by Dr. Vince Houghton, historian and curator at the International Spy Museum. Dr. Houghton specializes in intelligence, diplomatic, and military history, with expertise in the late-WWII and early-Cold War eras. The International Spy Museum in Washington, DC is the only public museum in the U.S. solely dedicated t ...
 
Covert takes listeners on a heart-pounding journey through the most dangerous military operations of all time. From the assassination of Osama Bin Laden and how two Israeli snipers foiled Syria’s plan to develop a nuclear bomb, to the real story that inspired the movie Black Hawk Down and the harrowing tale of a British Major’s escape from 2,000 heavily armed militants, you'll be brought to the front line of history’s greatest special forces missions.
 
History! The most exciting and important things that have ever happened on the planet! Featuring reports from the weird and wonderful places around the world where history has been made and interviews with some of the best historians writing today. Dan also covers some of the major anniversaries as they pass by and explores the deep history behind today's headlines - giving you the context to understand what is going on today.
 
A history podcast with a twist: Friendly Fire uses war movies as a point of entry on not only the history of war, but the history of how societies think about war. John Roderick, Adam Pranica and Benjamin Ahr Harrison dissect movies from throughout the history of cinema, talk about film production, pedantic quibbles with costumes and airplanes, and keep you laughing the entire time.
 
Battlecast is the world’s foremost podcast about war and it’s sociopolitical impact. Each month Dr. Luke Wolf works to bring you an unfiltered understanding of the most important battles and wars of mankind’s history. The official motto of the show: “not left, not right: above,” provides a fresh look at the conventional understandings found in history books. So pull up a chair, grab a beer, and join the conversation.
 
In "Hardcore History" journalist and broadcaster Dan Carlin takes his "Martian", unorthodox way of thinking and applies it to the past. Was Alexander the Great as bad a person as Adolf Hitler? What would Apaches with modern weapons be like? Will our modern civilization ever fall like civilizations from past eras? This isn't academic history (and Carlin isn't a historian) but the podcast's unique blend of high drama, masterful narration and Twilight Zone-style twists has entertained millions ...
 
Achtung! Achtung! Comedian Al Murray and historian James Holland discuss all matters Second World War. We Have Ways of Making You Talk is a weekly show exploring the war in close up. James and Al have a stunning knowledge of their subject, but don't expect a linear narrative. The boys love a tangent and a forgotten tale. We Have Ways of Making You Talk roams down forgotten front lines, casts new villains and makes the case for unlikely heroes. Send questions to James and Al via Twitter using ...
 
Scholars and witnesses present evidence documenting the mass atrocities that took place from 1933 through to the end of World War II in 1945, giving voice to the memories of the 6 million Jews and 5 million other victims who were murdered throughout Nazi Germany and German-occupied territories under the command of Adolf Hitler.
 
Servicemembers from across the military, sharing their accounts of combat and survival. Hosted by sports talk radio host and Army veteran, Mark Zinno, this podcast brings you firsthand accounts of war, with a perspective you only get from someone who has lived through it. From WWII to Vietnam, Somalia, and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, hear inspirational stories of service and resiliency from those who have fought on and off the battlefield!
 
Bletchley Park is the home of British codebreaking and a birthplace of modern information technology. It played a major role in World War Two, producing secret intelligence which had a direct and profound influence on the outcome of the conflict. The site is now a museum and heritage attraction, open daily. The Bletchley Park Podcast brings you fascinating stories from Veterans, staff and volunteers on the significance and continued relevance of this site today.
 
Learn the lessons of military history by looking at the great battles through the lens of the Principles of War. Part of the enduring nature of war, all good Generals follow the 10 Principles of War. The great Generals of history have the ability to know which of the principles are most important at the decisive moments of the campaign. We study the great battles to draw the lessons on strategy, tactics and leadership.
 
The Black Vault Radio with John Greenewald, Jr. dives deep into the world of secret U.S. Government and Military History spanning more than a half century. Using an archive of more than 2,100,000 declassified government documents as a starting point, Greenewald speaks to some of the most brilliant minds on the planet trying to get to the truth.
 
History of the Great War is a weekly podcast that will cover the First World War that occurred from 1914 and 1918. Every week we will be discussing the events that occurred exactly 100 years ago. We will journey from the borders of France in the blistering heat of 1914, to the shores of Gallipoli, to the banks of Somme, to the final knockout attempt by the German army in the spring of 1918.
 
World War II Chronicles is a weekly look back to 'This Week in World War II, 75 Years Ago.' Originally produced in coordination with the National Archives to mark the 50th anniversary of the war, World War II Chronicles features original newsreel reports and archival footage to tell the story as it happened, week by week. Hosted by famed World War II newsreel anchor Ed Herlihy, World War II Chronicles is produced by the American Veterans Center.
 
War Stories is a narrative show that takes the broad arcs of warfare and shares the stories behind crucial points their development. In each season, the show revolves around a single topic and traces a path from before its invention to the modern-day with a focus on the people who made it happen.
 
The Spear is a podcast from the Modern War Institute at West Point. It aims to explore the combat experience, with each episode featuring a guest who tells a detailed and personal story, describing the events and exploring topics like decision-making under stress and what it feels like to be in combat.
 
Over 900 years ago, thousands of Christians invaded the Middle East, intent on taking the Holy Land from the Muslims. The following 200 years were marked by a series of military campaigns known as the Crusades. Join us to follow the history of the Crusades from 1095 onwards. Castles, battles, religious clashes, Richard the Lionheart, the Assassins, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Saladin, the Knights Templar - all will feature as we examine one of the most interesting periods in history.
 
I'm Cullen Burke and this is Cauldron, a history of the world battle by battle. Every two weeks I'll cover the important battles in history and then hash out listener theories and thoughts on how the world would look if the outcome were different.
 
History is, indeed, a story. With his unique voice and engaging delivery, historian and veteran storyteller Fred Kiger will help the compelling stories of the American Civil War come alive in each and every episode. Filled with momentous issues and repercussions that still resonate with us today, this series will feature events and people from that period and will strive to make you feel as if you were there.
 
The Anglo-Boer War 1899-1902 saw the British Empire at the height of its power facing a small band of highly mobile Boers in South Africa. The war introduced the world to the concentration camp and is regarded as the first war of the modern era where magazine rifles, trenches and machine guns were deployed extensively. British losses topped 28 000 in a conflict that was supposed to take a few weeks but lasted three years.
 
The Battles of the First World War Podcast goes in-depth into the battles of the Great War of 1914-1918. The goal is to really go into the details of how and why these battles unfolded and happened as they did. In telling the narrative of these clashes we can revisit some of the stories of the men and women who lived, fought, and died during the first titanic struggle of the 20th Century, for these people have stories that deserve to be told.
 
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show series
 
This interview coincides with the 70th anniversary of the Korean War, a war that, as Baik reminds us, has not officially ended. How are the particularities of the Korean War, as an unended war, expressed in the lives of survivors and their descendants? This work explores how violence is narrated and framed in the lives and works of diasporic subjec…
 
Check out this book here https://amzn.to/3e5qbza Scott Lingamfelter was a senior Artillery Officer and Middle East expert when he participated in the First Gulf War as XO of 1st ARTY. He wrote a book detailing his time in that war, including tactical and operational issues, and his thoughts about the geopolitical and strategic aspects of the war. W…
 
This is Part III of our look at Lord Horatio Nelson and the practice of Mission Command. Check out episode 1 of our Nelson and Mission Command series. Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast. Join the conversation o…
 
The Covid crisis has seen a huge deployment of UK armed forces personnel to assist the civilian government. Named Operation RESCRIPT it has seen soldiers, sailors and aviators fulfil a wide range of tasks. I wanted to get a sense of the different challenges that the forces face when operating on home soil, and whether their conventional training pr…
 
Dr. Ty Seidule, Brigadier General U.S. Army (Retired) and Emeritus Professor of History at the United States Military Academy (West Point), enlightens us about the founding of Confederate-named military bases in the United States. Forts Bragg, Lee, Benning, Gordon, Rucker, Hood, Pickett, Beauregard, Hill, and Polk are in the news now. Demands for t…
 
The Australian 3rd Division Memorial sits above the town of Sailly-le-Sec for a good reason.... "We eventually arrived at Heilly. Passed a few stragglers – Tommies – the remnants of Gough’s British Fifth Army, which had been overtaken by disaster. The citizens had evacuated Heilly before we arrived. Here we dumped our packs and belongings and got i…
 
Anne Glenconner has been at the centre of the royal circle from childhood, when she met and befriended the future Queen Elizabeth II and her sister, the Princess Margaret. Anne spoke to me from the resplendent saloon at Holkham Hall to discuss her truly remarkable life - a story of drama, tragedy and royal secrets. A story she reflects on with a ch…
 
I was delighted to be joined by one of the most important people in the history world at the moment: Professor Vincent Gaffney. He is the leading archaeologist behind the recent discovery of a vast neolithic circle of deep shafts in Durrington, near Stonehenge. Vince took me through the thrills and surprises of his epic discovery and how it transfo…
 
War in Europe: 1450 to the Present (Bloomsbury Academic, 2016) is a masterful overview of war and military development in Europe since 1450, bringing together the work of a renowned historian of modern European and military history in a single authoritative volume. Beginning with the impact of the Reformation and continuing up to the present day, P…
 
I was thrilled to be joined on the podcast by the wonderful Simon Elliott. In this episode, Simon and I got to grips with the epic Roman Navy, and what it was doing on the shores of Britain. Enjoy! Subscribe to History Hit and you'll get access to hundreds of history documentaries, as well as every single episode of this podcast from the beginning …
 
For more than 20 years, The Black Vault has collected thousands of pages on the UFO phenomena through official channels. But, what happens, when documents surface by unofficial means? Leaked documents and unsubstantiated rumors have plagued the field of UFOlogy for decades. And the biggest question we all have to ask ourselves when that so-called e…
 
How did an authoritarian regime help lay the cornerstones of human rights and international law? Soviet Judgement at Nuremberg: A New History of the International Military Tribunal  (Oxford University Press, 2020) argues that Anglo-American dominated histories capture the moment while missing the story. Drawing upon secret archives open for a few b…
 
In Ancient Warfare Answers, Jasper (editor of Ancient Warfare Magazine) and Murray (deputy editor) tackle your questions on ancient military topics. In this episode Jasper explains why Roman republican cavalry so poor? It's thanks to patron Jo-jo Sun for sending us that. If you have any questions email Jasper at editor@ancient-warfare.com…
 
In Spring of 1945, the detailed horror of what the Nazi's did in Germany and inside the concentration camps was revealed to the public. Before this period many people didn't know the extent of situation. The concentration camps became referred to as "Murder Mills" and even war veterans like General Eisenhower and Patton who saw thousands of deaths …
 
George Ciampa wanted to be a military pilot but instead he was assigned to the U.S. Army's 607th Graves Registration Company, which was responsible for retrieving fallen service members and finding temporary resting place for Americans, allies, and even enemies as the battles of World War II unfolded. Ciampa shares why he got sent to Europe sooner …
 
More than 70 years after her death, Mata Hari is still a household name throughout the Western world. So who was this daughter of a Dutch hat-maker, who was executed for espionage after a secret trial during the darkest days of World War One? Julie Wheelwright joined me on the pod to guide me through the world of female espionage, the forces behind…
 
Cocaine is the second most popular illicit drug in the world and it’s controlled by a black market regulated by violence. As America’s drug war edges close to its fiftieth birthday, there is no end in sight, the conflicts it fuels have expanded to an unprecedented scale and cocaine remains incredibly profitable. Here to talk to us about cartels and…
 
In History of Europe: From Prehistory to the 21st Century, Jeremy Black presents a learned and yet entertaining exploration of the history: political, cultural and social of Europe from its prehistory to the 21st century. Beautifully illustrated and written, the book provides the lay reader as well as the academic one Jeremy Black's deep reading of…
 
Was Weimar doomed from the outset? In November 1918: The German Revolution (Oxford University Press, 2020), Robert Gerwarth argues that this is the wrong question to ask. Forget 1929 and 1933, the collapse of Imperial Germany began as a velvet revolution where optimism was as common as pessimism. A masterful synthesis told through diaries and memor…
 
As a parting piece of wisdom about generational stewardship of land and nature, Chief Seattle supposedly said to American colonizers pushing west, "we do not inherit the earth from our ancestors; we borrow it from our children." But, like spiritual quotes that get attached to a great many leaders, this may have complicated origins. Listen and learn…
 
The recorded story of Scotland begins with the arrival of the Romans in the 1st century, when the province of Britannia reached as far north as the Antonine Wall. But how much further back can the history of Scotland be traced? Who were the Picts and the Gaels? And how did the Viking invasion unite them? Rob Weinberg asks the big how and why questi…
 
In this episode, Mick chats with the Australian National University's Dr Andrew Carr. They discuss the recently released Australian Defence Strategic Update 2020, Australian Strategic culture, and how strategic policy formulation is influenced. Andrew gives a new answer to the final question. Become a member of our social network, the #TDPCommunity…
 
Just how neutral was Sweden in the Second World War? Al Murray and James Holland debate this as well recounting the role of an unusual Scottish spy. Join the We Have Ways members’ club now for £5 a month using the link below: Patreon.com/wehaveways A Goalhanger Films production Produced by Joey McCarthy Exec Producer Tony Pastor Twitter: #WeHaveWay…
 
dSoon after atomic bombs exploded over Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, MGM set out to make a movie studio chief Louis B. Mayer called “the most important story” he would ever film: a big budget dramatization of the Manhattan Project and the invention and use of the revolutionary new weapon. Greg Mitchell’s The Beginning or the End: How Hollywood—an…
 
In this episode, we are diving into one of the more controversial and least covered battles of WWII - the fight for Monte Cassino. A sideshow to the main events of Normandy and the Eastern Front, the Italian Campaign was no less violent or brutal, consuming men and material at the same rate as the worst fighting in either World War. The ancient mon…
 
I was joinded by Dr Charlotte Riley, a feminist historian of 20th century Britain. Whilst lecturing on the Labour Party, decolonization, and overseas aid and development programmes, Charlotte has been an important voice in the debate surrounding the role of public statues. How do statues enhance or subvert our understanding of the past? Can we ever…
 
Blow up Mount Rushmore.Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/lionsledbydonkeysSources: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/sordid-history-mount-rushmore-180960446/https://www.washingtonpost.com/history/2020/07/03/mount-rushmore-gutzon-borglum-klan-stone-mountain/https://apnews.com/430aa7f10b344eef891ff733116cf3aehttps://melmagazine.com/en-us…
 
Over the summer of 1777, native tribes along the western frontier attack American settlements. In August, they attack Fort Henry in Virginia. After a sustained attack, the garrison receives reinforcements and forces the attackers to abandon the siege. Visit my site at https://blog.AmRevPodcast.com for more text, pictures, maps, and sources on this …
 
Alex Larman has struck gold. He discovered one of the rarest and most precious things in the history world: an unknown source which shines a bright new light on its subject. He uncovered brand new documents relating to an assassination attempt on Edward VIII in July 1936, by George McMahon. Alex took me through the documents he found and the story …
 
This episode introduces Gen. William Slim of BurCorps. It would be his job to turn the tables on the Japanese in Burma, by working with American Gen. Joseph "Vinegar Joe" Stilwell. But first, we look back at Slim's experiences in the Middle East as the Allies subdue Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Iran. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm…
 
This week we’re joined by P.W. Singer, co-author of Burn-In: A Novel of the Real Robotic Revolution. The future is here, it's just not evenly distributed. Stray thoughts on the Bonus Army. The future of policing might be AI and that’s terrifying. Domestic terrorism is about to get even weirder than it already is. War has already changed. You can li…
 
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