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Best NSPR podcasts we could find (updated June 2020)
Best NSPR podcasts we could find
Updated June 2020
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Hosted by Tess Vigeland, veteran journalist and former anchor for American Public Media’s “Marketplace,” “After Paradise” is dedicated to post-Camp Fire recovery information. Each weekday, Tess and the NSPR News Team will bring you the latest from government officials, rescue organizations, financial planners, trauma experts and local reporters.
 
Blue Dot, named after Carl Sagan's famous speech about our place in the universe, features interviews with guests from all over the regional, national and worldwide scientific communities. Host Dave Schlom leads discussions about the issues science is helping us address with experts who shed light on climate change, space exploration, astronomy, technology and much more. Dave asks us to remember: from deep space, we all live on a pale, blue dot.
 
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After spending the last two years looking back at the Apollo Program, Dave looks ahead to the Commercial Crew flight program and Project Artemis. We hear first from Daniel Huot, a NASA spokesperson who is doing commentary during the historic first flight of the Crew Dragon Demo 2 mission with astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley set to put Americ…
 
Rick Barram is a teacher and Civil War re-enactor who lives in Red Bluff. He researched diaries, letters, and official reports to write a history of the ordinary soldier in the Civil War. Much of the book started as a series of articles for his reenacting group’s newsletter, accumulated over many years. Those articles strung together made up much o…
 
Dave visits with legendary United States Geological Survey volcanologist Donald Swanson in this look back at the eruption of Mt. St. Helens on May 18, 1980. Preceded by weeks of earthquakes and minor eruptions, Mt. St. Helens exploded in violent fury on that fateful spring morning in the Pacific Northwest, taking 57 lives and devastated millions of…
 
Daniel M. Veidlinger is a Professor in the Department of Comparative Religion and Humanities at California State University of Chico. His training is in the texts, languages and practices of South and Southeast Asian religions, in particular Buddhism and Hinduism. Host Nancy Wiegman chats about his work, From Indra’s Net to Internet: Communication,…
 
In this episode, we explore the amazing story of the Western Flyer, the fishing boat immortalized by John Steinbeck in his 1940 book The Log From The Sea of Cortez. Fresh off the success and controversy surrounding The Grapes of Wrath, Steinbeck and his best friend and mentor in the newly emerging science of ecology, marine biologist Ed Ricketts (t…
 
Dave talks to retired NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson. She holds records for the most time in space for any American, any woman and commanded the International Space Station TWICE! Peggy shares her out of this world experiences by giving very down to Earth advice about how to deal with living in a confined space with your crew -- which for many of us,…
 
Gayle Brandeis grew up in the Chicago area and has been writing poems and stories since she was four years old. She is the author of many titles, including Fruitflesh: Seeds of Inspiration for Women Who Write , the novel The Book of Dead Birds , which won Barbara Kingsolver’s Bellwether Prize for Fiction of Social Engagement. Her latest, Many Restl…
 
In the conclusion of our look back at the Apollo 13 mission 50 years ago, Dave is joined by Barbara Lovell Harrison, John Aaron, and Andrew Chaikin. Barbara Lovell was 16-years old when her father's lunar mission, which was supposed to be the third Moon landing, was abruptly aborted by an oxygen tank explosion that crippled the spacecraft Odyssey a…
 
Dave revisits a conversation with two of the Deputy Project Scientists deeply involved with the Curiosity Rover, which has been exploring Gale Crater since 2012, and the new, yet to be named, Mars 2020 Rover that will be launching this July. Abigail Fraeman is the DPS for Curiosity and explains how the mobile science laboratory has furthered our un…
 
Conservation scientist and author Lauren E. Oakes set out to chronicle how plants and people could cope with their rapidly changing world. From California, she traveled to the southeast coast of Alaska to discover that groves of yellow-cedar were on the decline. Looking for a doctoral thesis topic, the fast-disappearing yellow-cedar became the focu…
 
In the conclusion of our look back at the Apollo 13 mission 50 years ago, Dave is joined by Barbara Lovell Harrison, John Aaron, and Andrew Chaikin. Barbara Lovell was 16-years old when her father's lunar mission, which was supposed to be the third Moon landing, was abruptly aborted by an oxygen tank explosion that crippled the spacecraft Odyssey a…
 
Local researcher Maris Thompson collected stories of immigration in the German American Midwest during World War I. Award-winning NPR journalist Tom Gjelten talked to immigrant families in Virginia for his book A Nation of Nations. This week join Nancy for immigration stories past and present.By angelhuracha@gmail.com (ahuracha)
 
In a time of global crisis, it's good to look at the lessons of history, to help us understand that we do have the ability to overcome terrible adversity. The story of the near loss of Apollo 13 in April of 1970 is filled with amazing leadership, problem solving and heroism that led to the survival of astronauts Jim Lovell, Fred Haise and Jack Swig…
 
Author Jackie Shannon Hollis explores the past in her memoir, This Particular Happiness: A Childless Love Story. This Particular Happiness examines relationships, parenthood and the meaning of life. Take a journey with Hollis, from her early years in Oregon to her hard-earned self-acceptance in the later years.…
 
For scientists in the fields of chemistry, medicine, and physics, there is the Nobel Prize and all the accolades that come with it. But for scientists in the environmental sciences, the Tyler Prize was created by Ann and John Tyler in 1973 to recognize scientists making world-class contributions to the fields of science that most impact our underst…
 
Emily Gallo moved to Chico, CA, and retired from teaching in 2006. She started writing screenplays and television and moved into novels. She published her first novel, Venice Beach, in 2015 and has written five more novels: The Columbarium, Kate & Ruby, Roads Not Taken, Murder at the Columbarium, and her latest, The Last Resort.…
 
On this classic episode of Blue Dot we revisit Lassen Volcanic National Park, the latest addition to the University of California Natural Reserve System. The 41 units of the UCNRS represent virtually every ecosystem in this ecologically diverse state and make it the largest university affiliated preserve system in the world.…
 
In this episode, Dave is going to the dogs. Literally. But that's OK with him because Dave loves dogs and dogs love him and now, thanks to Dr. Clive Wynne, he can prove it. Dr. Wynne, a researcher in animal behavior at Arizona State University, is the author of the new book, Dog is Love: Why and How Your Dog Loves You. From Pavlov's dogs (you'll fi…
 
In this episode of “After Paradise,” we commemorate the year anniversary of the Camp Fire by focusing on where we are now, 365 days after the fire. We’ll hear from those working in mental health about how the one year mark is triggering stress and anxiety for many in the community, and about practical ways to manage. We’ll hear about recovery from …
 
RVs, mother-in-law units, couches, spare rooms — six months after the Camp Fire those who were displaced are still scrambling for housing, living wherever they can. NSPR’s Marc Albert went to the Matador Motel in Chico where he met Lorrie Peters Summers whose been living with her family in a room there since the fire.…
 
The deadly wildfire that tore through Paradise six months ago is in the distant past to most of us. But thousands of people displaced by the Camp Fire are still piecing their lives back together, many, trying to find a permanent place to live. Reporter Pauline Bartolone has the story of one family that’s trying to find peace while they’re in housin…
 
Thousands of people fled the Ridge November 8, 2018. In one day the population of the neighboring City of Chico exploded. In terms of shelter, Chico was already in a housing crisis before the fire, now that’s been exacerbated as those who were displaced search for any type of dwelling to live in that they can find. Ed Mayer is the Executive Directo…
 
Towering, shade-giving Ponderosas were as emblematic of Paradise as its Dogtown Nugget and Gold Rush origin, which is probably why so many of you have written in with questions about trees. We have answered specific questions about what to do if you have burned trees on your property and whether native species will be removed if they pose a hazard …
 
Six months since the Camp Fire struck, officials in Butte County told KQED's Michelle Wiley that some students are experiencing the same mental health issues they had just after the fire. And they need more counselors to support them. Pamela Beeman had been retired for five years when she got the call from Butte County.…
 
This week we get our regular update from government officials and they also answer your questions about debris removal, rebuilding and housing. Earlier this morning NSPR’s Marc Albert spoke with Rebeca Kelly of FEMA, Justin Jacobs of CalOES, Casey Hatcher of Butte County and Colette Curtis from the Town of Paradise to get the latest.…
 
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