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Best National Arts Centre podcasts we could find (updated January 2020)
Best National Arts Centre podcasts we could find
Updated January 2020
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Each week day RN Arts programs zoom in on a specific area of art and culture, brought to you by a specialist presenter. Subscribe to their podcasts separately by searching by name in your podcasting app.
 
Join host Sean Rice (Second Clarinet, NAC Orchestra) as he explores the world of classical music and its great composers. In this series of audio programmes you can look forward to hearing insightful commentary about upcoming NAC Orchestra programmes as well as musical excerpts and interviews with NACO musicians and guest artists.
 
We're a podcast for anyone who writes. Every week we talk to writers about their writing journeys and techniques, from early career debuts to self-publishers and narrative designers. We've featured Margaret Atwood, Jackie Kay, Sara Collins, Antti Tuomainen, Val McDermid, Sarah Perry, Elif Shafak and many more!Brought to you by the National Centre for Writing at Dragon Hall in Norwich.
 
From ballet to contemporary dance, these podcasts feature fascinating conversations between NAC Dance Producer Cathy Levy and some of the world's most exciting dance artists, all of whom will be appearing, or have appeared, at the National Arts Centre.
 
A classical music podcast. Join the National Arts Centre Orchestra's Marjolaine Fournier and one Canada's foremost music journalists, Jean-Jacques van Vlasselaer, as they explore the symphonic form from Haydn to Shostakovich.
 
The Little Red Podcast: interviews and chat celebrating China beyond the Beijing beltway. Hosted by Graeme Smith, China studies academic at the Australian National University's Department of Pacific Affairs and Louisa Lim, former China correspondent for the BBC and NPR, now with the Centre for Advancing Journalism at Melbourne University. We are the 2018 winners of podcast of the year in the News & Current Affairs category of the Australian Podcast Awards. Follow us @limlouisa and @GraemeKSm ...
 
The Poetry Society was founded in 1909 to promote "a more general recognition and appreciation of poetry". Since then, it has grown into one of Britain's most dynamic arts organisations, representing British poetry both nationally and internationally. Today it has more than 4000 members worldwide and publishes the leading poetry magazine, The Poetry Review.With innovative education and commissioning programmes and a packed calendar of performances, readings and competitions, the Poetry Socie ...
 
One of Canada’s best political analysts, Paul Wells, sits down with leading political figures and social influencers for a conversation on the most compelling issues and news of the day. The monthly series is produced by CPAC in partnership with Maclean’s and the National Arts Centre.Maclean’s magazine senior writer Paul Wells is one of Canada’s leading political journalists. In nearly a quarter century on Parliament Hill he has covered four prime ministers and seven federal elections. His a ...
 
A series of interviews by Peter Hinton, Artistic Director of English Theatre at Canada's National Arts Centre in Ottawa
 
In each episode, you will learn about NAC English Theatre productions through an encounter with Artistic Director Jillian Keiley and two special guests offering unique perspectives on a theatrical work.
 
Hosted by Stanley Asher on Radio Centre-Ville CINQ 102.3 FM in Montreal. The program highlights arts, entertainment and cultural events on the local scene. You will also hear in-depth interviews with local and visiting national and international artists.
 
Some of the biggest and most influential names in modern literature, art, music and performance share their stories, thoughts and ideas. In this podcast you'll hear us in conversation with the people shaping arts and culture today. Southbank Centre is home to Royal Festival hall, Hayward Gallery, Queen Elizabeth Hall, Purcell Room and the National Poetry Library. Our podcasts reflect our richly diverse events, exhibitions and festivals programme featuring artists and thinkers from around the ...
 
Videocast with Chef Kurt Waldele of Canada's National Arts Centre
 
Cathy Booth interviews novices and some of the most famous ringers in the world to reveal the mysteries of this heard, but often hidden art.
 
Emotions shape individual, community and national identities. The ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (CHE) uses historical knowledge from Europe, 1100=1800, to understand the long history of emotional behaviours. Based at The University of Western Australia, with additional nodes at the Universities of Adelaide, Melbourne, Queensland and Sydney, CHE investigates how European societies thought, felt and functioned, and how these changes impact life in Australia today. More a ...
 
How did the NAC Orchestra become the world class organization it is today? Veteran broadcaster Eric Friesen chronicles the unfolding drama of the NAC Orchestra from its earliest days in 1969 to the present time. With his charming personality and a host of probing questions, he interviews conductors, orchestral musicians, guest artists and administrators about the Orchestra’s beginnings, the challenges it faced, the tours it made all over Canada and to many foreign lands, and the kind of indi ...
 
Welcome to Alliance: a podcast about the humanities and existential risk. Existential risks are risks that threaten to wipe out humanity or destroy human civilisation, like nuclear warfare, climate change and artificial intelligence. Join us as we discover what the humanities - history, philosophy, literature and the arts - have to say about them. This series is run by Alice Evatt (DPhil Philosophy, Balliol College) and Henry Tann (DPhil, History, Balliol College). The series is sponsored by ...
 
Dubliners is a collection of 15 short stories by James Joyce, first published in 1914. They form a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century. The stories were written when Irish nationalism was at its peak and a search for a national identity and purpose was raging; at a crossroads of history and culture, Ireland was jolted by various converging ideas and influences. They centre on Joyce's idea of an epiphany: a moment where ...
 
Antoine Compagnon, born on July 20, 1950 in Brussels, has been professor of "Modern and Contemporary French Literature: history, criticism, and theory" at the Collège de France since 2006. He has also been Professor of French and Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York since 1985, holding the "Blanche W. Knopf" chair since 1991. Formerly a student at the École Polytechnique (1970), and an engineer from the Ponts et Chaussées engineering school (1975), he was awarded a PhD i ...
 
Until 1918 the extensive palatial complex at the heart of Vienna was the political centre of the monarchy. Today it fulfills the same role for the democratic Republic of Austria. The rooms where the Congress of Vienna met and danced and where Emperor Franz Joseph held audiences, now houses the offices of the Federal President, the ministers of the chancellor’s office and the secretaries of state. This sprawling, asymmetric complex of building with its 19 courtyards and 18 wings is also home ...
 
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show series
 
Isabel Allende asks where she belongs, writers respond to the bushfire crisis and finding Anne Bronte 200 years after her birth.
 
Julia Crouch is the Queen of Domestic Noir, writer of Her Husband's Lover and The Long Fall, designer of our Start Writing Crime Fiction course and regular attendee of the Noirwich Crime Writing Festival. In today's episode she joins us to discuss her twisty-turny career and how becoming a writer doesn't always happen in the most obvious of ways. I…
 
Comedians Joel Creasey and Lawrence Leung join Beverley and Benjamin at the Wheeler Centre to divulge their surprising pop culture pleasures.
 
In a summer highlights edition Renee Zellweger talks about her dazzling performance as Judy Garland in the biopic Judy. Joel Edgerton discusses The King, a film he co-wrote with director David Michod and also stars in. Producer Darren Dale talks about the ABC TV series Total Control, and Breaking Bad alumni RJ Mitte with his Top Shelf.…
 
Last year marked the centenary of the Bauhaus school, which revolutionised art and design. We revisit the legacy of the school in Australia, and meet a costume designer making bodysuits for Beyonce.
 
This episode is guaranteed to cure your post holiday blues with laughter. Heather and the Good Lovelies do their best to keep things professional as they chat about performing their 13th annual Christmas tour, bringing their kids along for the ride and mastering social media. The Good Lovelies are unanimous in their vote for favourite tour location…
 
Tim Winton's Cloudstreet returns to the stage, we look back at when Stephen Sondheim and Harold Prince staged some of the most inventive and challenging musical theatre Broadway had ever seen, we tour The Australian Ballet Centre's pointe shoe room and learn that it takes a firm hand to mould a soft shoe, and playwright Michelle Law drops by to sha…
 
The two British authors have used elements of Shakespeare's tale in their latest novel. Christos Tsiolkas has chosen a different source: St Paul.
 
In this archival episode of the NACOcast host Sean Rice, NAC Orchestra’s 2nd clarinetist, speaks with conductor Peter Oundjian weeks before his retirement as Music Director of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra in 2018. They discuss Bruckner’s Eighth Symphony and Peter shares memories from his student days at The Juilliard School, his first encounter w…
 
Special guest Katri Skala joins us on the pod to talk about her work mentoring writers, and how mentoring can help writers identify their goals.Hosted by Steph McKenna and Simon Jones.Find out about our work at https://nationalcentreforwriting.org.ukAbout our mentoring services: https://nationalcentreforwriting.org.uk/mentoring/Katri's website: htt…
 
Me Too movement founder Tarana Burke on her work before and after #Metoo went viral in October 2017 and some of the challenges of Me Too in Australia and
 
In a summer highlights edition we revisit interviews with Cannes winning director Bong Joon-ho and Adelaide director Sophie Hyde, who made the 2019 film Animals with Alia Shawkat and Holliday Grainger. The creators and stars of Rosehaven are in, and Lulu Wang shares her Top Shelf.
 
Ed speaks to three guests about issues affecting contemporary artists working today, including pay and funding, gallery representation, and attitudes within and towards the art industry.
 
The writers of Who's Afraid of the Working Class? reunite for Anthem, choreographer Hofesh Shechter brings his Grand Finale back to Australia, we travel to the Komische Oper Berlin to find out how to make opera for everyone, and British comedian Sarah Millican takes control.
 
In the Xi Jinping era, China is quietly embedding core socialist values into every aspect of life, including the judicial system. When core socialist values were introduced in 2013, they sounded like one more slogan in the pantheon of forgettable party dogmas, but now they're gaining teeth. In this episode we examine how core socialist values are r…
 
She brings her history as a struggling young writer in the big city to her latest novel Memories of the Future.
 
Beverley and Benjamin are joined by writers Oliver Phommavanh and Jenna Guillaume at the Brisbane Writers Festival.
 
In a summer highlights edition, we revisit a conversation with the director behind the Up series on the latest instalment 63 Up. Plus, a look at how Arctic Noir is influencing the television landscape, and an interview with Juliette Binoche from Paris.
 
Come and visit an extraordinary world where world-class medicine intersects with world-class art; you will meet children, emergency doctors, and artists to find out how art is not only on the walls, but literally built into the hospital from the ground up.
 
The Stage Show takes you to the Adelaide Cabaret Festival with a broadcast live on stage from The Famous Spiegeltent in Elder Park. Co-hosted by festival artistic director Julia Zemiro with special performances from The Swell Mob, Philip Quast, Fiona Choi, Steven Oliver and Hans.
 
Writers Jasper Fforde, Karen Thompson Walker and Krissy Kneen explore the connection between dreams and fiction in a panel discussion from the Brisbane Writers Festival.
 
Sampa The Great on her new album and performing a live score for a film for the first time, Jan Fran introduces us to ContraPoints and Kanan Gill introduces us to some weird conspiracy theories. Plus Rainbow Chan destroys us with a live performance.
 
In a summer highlights edition we revisit a conversation with director of Rocketman Dexter Fletcher, plus a lookback at Round the Twist, an interview with Karyn Kusama on her L.A. Noir film Destroyer, and Kate McLennan and Kate McCartney share their Top Shelf.
 
When Marcel Duchamp brought a bicycle wheel on a stool into the gallery, he turned ideas of sculpture and authorship on their head. We reflect on the legacy of this great 20th century figure and meet a couple of contemporary art innovators working today.
 
John Tiffany and cast members discuss Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Marcia Hines and John Waters recall when Hair brought the promise of revolution to Australia, and we remember the defiance of those in drag at the Stonewall riots and meet three First Nations performers who continue to use drag as a tool for political expression.…
 
Authors Balli Kaur Jaswal, Markus Zusak and Amy Sackville compare notes on the writing process.
 
Beverley and Benjamin are joined by writers Brittney Cooper, Omar Sakr and Zoe Norton Lodge at the SWF.
 
Ed Parnell is on the pod to talk about his first non-fiction book, Ghostland. He discusses his obsession with structure, how to pitch a non-fiction book and how he switched from fiction to non-fiction.Simon and Steph also dive into the pod archive to pick out their favourite episodes of the year:Outer Wilds with Kelsey Beachum: https://nationalcent…
 
In a summer highlights edition we revisit a critics' panel on Quentin Tarantino's Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, an interview with screenwriter Joe Murphy from the TV show Younger, and actor and comedian Claudia O'Doherty's Top Shelf.
 
Hans and Nora Heysen are renowned for their almost spiritual love of nature, and the way they meticulously observed and painted Australian light, trees, and flowers. Ed speaks to Chris Heysen - grandson of Hans and nephew of Nora - and National Gallery of Victoria curator Angela Hesson about these two important Australian painters.…
 
We dive into Bizet's opera Carmen and the many ways the story continues to be told, we celebrate Uncle Jack Charles' Red Ochre Award win, and we meet the writers of Come from Away — a musical about the surprising impact of 9/11 on a remote Canadian town.
 
The sublime Principal Dancer Greta Hodgkinson spoke with Cathy Levy in December 2019 on the eve of her retirement from The National Ballet of Canada following an extraordinary 30-year career with the company. Dance found her at a very early age and she credits Principal Artistic Coach Magdalena Popa, leading choreographers and the full range of cla…
 
Salman Rushdie, Elif Shafak, and Lucy Ellman join the party.
 
Yves-François Blanchet, leader of the Bloc Québécois, joins Maclean’s senior writer Paul Wells for a candid conversation in front of a live audience at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.By Cable Public Affairs Channel (CPAC)
 
We look back at the last decade of pop culture - from polarising figures to how our phones and platforms changed the way we consume media - with The Guardian's culture editor Steph Harmon and playwright, TV writer and actor Nakkiah Lui.
 
Ever wondered what it was like to learn how to ring? Or have forgotten what it was like when you first started out? Discover, or rediscover, in this podcast, as host Cathy Booth talks to not one, but to two new ringers currently following the ART Learning The Ropes scheme. Linda simply answered an advertisement in village magazine posted by a fello…
 
A rough and raw account of three teenage boys' struggle with their sexuality and the pervasive homophobia in their regional town.
 
British director Nick Broomfield on his documentary Marianne & Leonard: Words of Love, a chronicle of the muse-artist relationship between Marianne Ihlen and Leonard Cohen that begins on the Greek island of Hydra in the 1960s. French-Canadian actor Théodore Pellerin talks to us about his dynamic performance as a devotee of a pyramid scheme in the s…
 
Each year, the Mayor of Oslo, Norway gifts a Christmas tree to the United Kingdom, in commemoration of the two countries' co-operation in the Second World War. The tree then makes the journey to Trafalgar Square in London, where it's on display throughout the holiday season. And each year, The Poetry Society commissions a leading poet to write a po…
 
Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso are thought of separately as two of the 20th Century's greatest artists, but did you know they had an enduring friendship and rivalry?
 
Black Cockatoo tells the story of Australia's first Indigenous sports star, cricketer Johnny Mullagh, we ask Australian creatives and performers to reflect on the last ten years of performing arts, Bernadette Robinson returns to Australia with Songs for Nobodies, and we share some seasonal cheer with Michael Cormick, Johanna Allen and the cast of C…
 
William Faulkner thought so. Katherine Colette, Robert Lukins, and Jock Serong face Wayne Macauley, Melanie Cheng, and Angela Savage to decide.
 
The L Word showrunner Ilene Chaiken on why they've rebooted the cult queer series 10 years later and film curator Kate Jinx on the legacy of the original series, plus WNYC producer Shima Oliaee on the two-year journey of making hit new podcast Dolly Parton’s America.
 
In this episode of the NACOcast host Sean Rice (Second clarinet, NAC Orchestra) speaks with Remy Siu Carrefour Composer (2017-2019) about his early interest in film as well as his multi-disciplinary studies at Simon Fraser Univeristy that sparked his love for artist collaboration. In 2015 in collaboration with Western Front, Remy fused his many int…
 
On the pod today we have literary translator and non-fiction writer Ekaterina Petrova. Ekaterina is from Bulgaria, and was our visiting resident for 10 days thanks to support from the Elizabeth Kostova Foundation.A big part of the conversation is about the challenge of making a living from being a literary translator - which, as you can imagine, is…
 
Cannes winning director Kore-eda Hirokazu talks about his film The Truth, his first film set outside of Japan with a cast including Catherine Deneuve, Juliette Binoche and Ethan Hawke. Brazilian film director Fernando Meirelles on The Two Popes, a bio-drama set behind the Vatican Walls, and Downton Abbey star Joanne Froggatt.…
 
In a conversation that will lighten spirits and fire up brain cells, Emily Berry talks to Mark Waldron in the latest Poetry Review podcast. They discuss children’s books, the theatre and performance, Beckett, Ashbery and “meant silliness”. “I like mixing up childhood and adulthood,” says Waldron, “things from childhood I want to resolve – or look a…
 
The irresistible theme of Water is explored in a new exhibition at GOMA in Queensland. And we meet Estonian photographer Sirli Raitma, and reflect on the life of Australian sculptor Robert Klippel.
 
Sean Rice, NAC Orchestra 2nd clarinet, talks with Toronto-based Carrefour* Composer Ian Cusson. They talk about R. Murray Schaffer, Bulgarian women’s choirs, and unrelated studies at the University of Toronto before delving into his chosen career. During Ian’s two year Carrefour residency with the NAC Orchestra from 2017-2019, he was commissioned f…
 
When the Hong Kong film Ten Years (Sap nin) came out in 2015, it was pulled from cinemas after Chinese state-run media described it as a 'virus of the mind'. Once seen as dystopian with its scenes of mass protest and police brutality, it now looks prophetic in a world where 88% of the Hong Kong population has been exposed to teargas. In this episod…
 
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