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History podcasts of Mexico, Latina, Latino, Hispanic, Chicana, Chicano, Mexicana, Mexicano, genealogy, mexico, mexican, mexicana, mexicano, mejico, mejicana, mejicano, hispano, hispanic, hispana, latino, latina, latin, america, espanol, espanola, spanish, indigenous, indian, indio, india, native, native american, chicano, chicana, mesoamerican, mesoamerica, raza, podcast, podcasting, nuestra, familia, or unida are welcome here. If it has to do with the history of America, California, Oregon, ...
 
The Native American Flute Music podcast is hosted by Bill Webb. Bill Webb is a composer, performer and singer of original music featuring Native American flute and world instruments. The Native American Flute Podcast includes music from dozens of his published albums from the first release, 'Native American Flute' in 2003 to 'Medicine' released in 2017. New albums will be played on the weekly podcasts as they are released along with the many previous albums. Native American Flute guest artis ...
 
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Paul Radin was one of the founding generation of American cultural anthropologists: A student of Franz Boas, and famed ethnographer of the Winnebago. Yet little is known about Radin's life. A leftist who was persecuted by the FBI and who lived for several years outside of the United States, and a bohemian who couldn't keep an academic job, there ar…
 
A close friend and muse of many of postrevolutionary Mexico's greatest artists, Luz Jiménez's likeness appears across Mexico City in the form of painting, photography, and sculpture. Jiménez's ubiquity has earned her the titles of "the most painted woman in all of Mexico" and "the archetype of Indigenous Mexican woman." And yet the details of her c…
 
John G. Turner's excellent new history of the early American separatists, They Knew They Were Pilgrims: Plymouth Colony and the Contest for American Liberty (Yale University Press, 2020) provides a new benchmark study of Plymouth Colony. Turner provides a readable and convincing narrative of how a group of religious refugees sought to establish a h…
 
In 1877, Eloosykasit was on his way Tolo Lake, a gathering place frequented by the Nez Perce, when he heard news of the Wallowa band's flight from the U.S. Army. Only seventeen at the time, Eloosykasit elected to remain with the migrant Nez Perce, arming himself with a rifle abandoned at White Bird Canyon, and following Chief Joseph on toward Monta…
 
For most of her life, Neets’aii Gwich’in leader Sarah James has worked to protect her homelands, which include the coastal plain of the nearby Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. It hasn’t been easy. The United States government wants to lease the area for oil exploration and drilling. The region’s longtime inhabitants say those plans threaten a belov…
 
The Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association has risen to the occasion to host the 62nd Annual Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, in spite of having to change venues in the pandemic year of 2020. The 10th round winners, Wrangler NFR Average Champions and PRCA World Champions, were crowned in the eight standard events, Saturday night at Globe Life Field …
 
The 2020 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo contestants of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association have been riding on a sliding scale the first portion of the event in Arlington, Texas, USA. The PRCA announced the $10,000,000.00 equal money to Las Vegas came to fruition prior to the 9th performance Friday night, due to ticket sales and the WNFR bei…
 
Canada night and the conclusion of the inaugural Ladies Breakaway Roping event added to the seven standard events in ProRodeo, are the highlights of the 62nd Annual Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in Arlington, Texas, round number 8 of 10. We celebrate the success and support the challenge of our six American Indian contestants that have qualified i…
 
Globe Life Field in Arlington, Texas held the 2020 MLB World Series and now, the 62nd Annual Wrangler National Finals Rodeo sanctioned by the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. We hope you are enjoying our coverage of six American Indian cowboys and cowgirls that have qualified in the top 15 in the world standings in each of their respective e…
 
The 2020 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo is celebrating 62 years, the pride of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association since 1959, this year being held in Arlington,Texas, USA. The sixth of ten performances sees a grateful field of contestants happy to compete and introduce ladies breakaway roping to the WNFR. The 2020 PRCA Ladies Breakaway Ropin…
 
The 2020 Tough Enough to Wear Pink Night (TETWP) at the 62nd Annual Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, sanctioned by the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association, was held in Arlington, Texas, USA. TETWP is a tradition to support breast cancer awareness and is the halfway mark of the 10 round competition in each of the eight standard events. The World C…
 
The Wrangler National Finals Rodeo celebrates it’s 62nd Annual NFR since it’s inception in 1959 in Dallas, Texas, there again in 1960 and 1961. Los Angeles, California hosted the years of 1962 and 1963. The marquis of sports finals, found a home in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in 1964, with Clem McSpadden, it grew and prospered in ‘OKC until 1984. In 19…
 
The Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association, 62nd Annual Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in Arlington, Texas, USA, is history in the making. A rank pen of bucking horses in the bareback and saddle bronc riding was brutal on the contestants, yet very entertaining to an enthusiastic, masked audience. Indian countries highlight included Cheyenne River S…
 
The 62nd Annual Wrangler National Finals Rodeo sanctioned by the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association concluded Round 2 of 10 at the Globe Life Field in Arlington, Texas, USA. This series of results and interviews is covering six Indian cowboys and cowgirls that have qualified in the top 15, by money won throughout the 2020 season, earning their …
 
December 3, 2020The 62nd Annual Wrangler National Finals Rodeo kicked off Thursday, December 3, 2020 in Arlington,Texas, with great talent representing Indian Country. Our contingency is lead by 2017 World Champion, Navajo, Erich Rogers whom is joined by 2X top 15 qualifier, Cherokee, Brenten Hall, both in Team Roping as headers. Saddle Bronc Rider…
 
Writing to U.S. President Grover Cleveland in 1888, Oglala Lakota leaders Little Wound, Young Man Afraid of His Horses, and Red Cloud insisted upon a simple yet significant demand to allow western Indigenous nations to retain intertribal communication networks, stating that "we do not want the gates closed between us." These vast networks - and the…
 
Behind the braided wigs, buckskins, and excess bronzer that typified the mid-century "filmic Indian" lies a far richer, deeper history of Indigenous labor, survival, and agency. This history takes center stage in historian Liza Black's new book, Picturing Indians: Native Americans in Film, 1941-1960 (University of Nebraska Press, 2020), which looks…
 
In Ireland in the Virginian Sea: Colonialism in the British Atlantic (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), Audrey Horning revisits the fraught connections between Ireland and colonial Virginia. Both modern scholars and early modern colonialists themselves viewed English incursions into Ireland and North America as intimately related. But the …
 
In Graphic Indigeneity: Comics in the Americas and Australasia (UP of Mississippi, 2020), Frederick Luis Aldama brings together comics scholars Joshua T. Anderson, Chad A. Barbour, Susan Bernardin, Mike Borkent, Jeremy M. Carnes, Philip Cass, Jordan Clapper, James J. Donahue, Dennin Ellis, Jessica Fontaine, Jonathan Ford, Lee Francis IV, Enrique Ga…
 
Our Time is Now: Race and Modernity in Postcolonial Guatemala (Cambridge University Press, 2020) is an ambitious exploration of modernity, history, and time in post-colonial Guatemala. Set in the Q’eqchi Maya highlands of Alta Verapaz from the 19th century into the 20th, Julie Gibbings explores how Q’eqchi, ladino, and German immigrant actors creat…
 
Agnès Delahaye’s new book, Settling the Good Land: Governance and Promotion in John Winthrop’s New England (Brill, 2020), is the story of John Winthrop’s tenure as governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in the 1630’s. In a correction to the prevailing narrative of Puritans alone in the New England wilderness, Professor Delahaye shows the colonist…
 
The Storyteller is a series of ten stories and folktales resurrected from the audio archives at KNBA in Anchorage, Alaska, as well as new stories from today’s Alaska Native culture bearers. The traditional stories provide cultural memories and lessons we can use in everyday life. The series is hosted by Canaar, the spirit that has arrived. Follow a…
 
People from communities across Alaska are gathering virtually for the 2020 Alaska Federation of Natives Annual Convention. Attendees are addressing many critical issues of public policy and government. COVID-19 has impacted tribal communities across the state, but the work of leaders continues amid the pandemic. Alaska Native cultural teachings, wi…
 
The Storyteller is a series of ten stories and folktales resurrected from the audio archives at KNBA in Anchorage, Alaska, as well as new stories from today’s Alaska Native culture bearers. The traditional stories provide cultural memories and lessons we can use in everyday life. The series is hosted by Canaar, the spirit that has arrived. Follow a…
 
The Storyteller is a series of ten stories and folktales resurrected from the audio archives at KNBA in Anchorage, Alaska, as well as new stories from today’s Alaska Native culture bearers. The traditional stories provide cultural memories and lessons we can use in everyday life. The series is hosted by Canaar, the spirit that has arrived. Follow a…
 
In his new book, Where Caciques and Mapmakers Met: Border Making in Eighteenth-Century South America (UNC Press, 2020), Dr. Jeffrey Erbig charts the interplay between imperial and indigenous spatial imaginaries and shows the critical role that indigenous actors played in imperial border-making between the Spanish and the Portuguese in the Río de la…
 
The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way people around the world are getting an education and conducting business. Since March, many tribal events and conferences have been postponed or cancelled. Others have moved to virtual platforms, which is the case for the 2020 First Alaskans Institute’s Elders and Youth Conference and the 2020 Alaska Federa…
 
The Storyteller is a series of ten stories and folktales resurrected from the audio archives at KNBA in Anchorage, Alaska, as well as new stories from today’s Alaska Native culture bearers. The traditional stories provide cultural memories and lessons we can use in everyday life. The series is hosted by Canaar, the spirit that has arrived. Follow a…
 
The Storyteller is a series of ten stories and folktales resurrected from the audio archives at KNBA in Anchorage, Alaska, as well as new stories from today’s Alaska Native culture bearers. The traditional stories provide cultural memories and lessons we can use in everyday life. The series is hosted by Canaar, the spirit that has arrived. Follow a…
 
The Storyteller is a series of ten stories and folktales resurrected from the audio archives at KNBA in Anchorage, Alaska, as well as new stories from today’s Alaska Native culture bearers. The traditional stories provide cultural memories and lessons we can use in everyday life. The series is hosted by Canaar, the spirit that has arrived. Follow a…
 
The Storyteller is a series of ten stories and folktales resurrected from the audio archives at KNBA in Anchorage, Alaska, as well as new stories from today’s Alaska Native culture bearers. The traditional stories provide cultural memories and lessons we can use in everyday life. The series is hosted by Canaar, the spirit that has arrived. Follow a…
 
The Storyteller is a series of ten stories and folktales resurrected from the audio archives at KNBA in Anchorage, Alaska, as well as new stories from today’s Alaska Native culture bearers. The traditional stories provide cultural memories and lessons we can use in everyday life. The series is hosted by Canaar, the spirit that has arrived. Follow a…
 
The Storyteller is a series of ten stories and folktales resurrected from the audio archives at KNBA in Anchorage, Alaska, as well as new stories from today’s Alaska Native culture bearers. The traditional stories provide cultural memories and lessons we can use in everyday life. The series is hosted by Canaar, the spirit that has arrived. Follow a…
 
The Storyteller is a series of ten stories and folktales resurrected from the audio archives at KNBA in Anchorage, Alaska, as well as new stories from today’s Alaska Native culture bearers. The traditional stories provide cultural memories and lessons we can use in everyday life. The series is hosted by Canaar, the spirit that has arrived. Follow a…
 
Charles F. Walker’s Witness to the Age of Revolution: The Odyssey of Juan Bautista Tupac Amaru, 2020, is part of Oxford University Press’ Graphic History Series, which takes serious archival research and puts it into a comic format. For this volume, the brilliant Liz Clarke illustrated Dr. Walker’s biography of a ½ brother of José Gabriel Condorcan…
 
Before the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana became one of the state’s top private employers—with its vast landholdings and economic enterprises—they lived well below the poverty line and lacked any clear legal status. After settling in the Bayou Blue in 1884, they forged friendships with their neighbors, sparked local tourism, and struck strategic alli…
 
David Tavárez is a historian and linguistic anthropologist; he is Professor of Anthropology and Director of Latin American and Latino/a Studies at Vassar College. He is a specialist in Nahuatl and Zapotec texts, the study of Mesoamerican religions and rituals, Catholic campaigns against idolatry, Indigenous intellectuals, and native Christianities.…
 
Native Women’s Equal Pay Day is on October 1, 2020. This is the day Native women must work into the new year to make what White men made at the end of last year given that Native Women earn approximately only $0.57 cents on the dollar of White, non-Hispanic men. Listen in on a conversation focused on the active allyship, advocacy, and structural ch…
 
In 1800, tens of millions of bison roamed the North American Great Plains. By 1900, fewer than 1,000 remained. In The Destruction of the Bison: An Environmental History, 1750-1920 (Cambridge UP, 2000), the University of Kansas Hall Distinguished Professor of History Andrew C. Isenberg explains how this ecological calamity came to pass. Bison popula…
 
Transforming Indigenity: Urbanization and Language Revitalization in the Brazilian Amazon (University of Toronto Press) examines the role that language revitalization efforts play in cultural politics in the small city of São Gabriel da Cachoeira, located in the Brazilian Amazon. Sarah Shulist concentrates on how debates, discussions, and practices…
 
Spanning three hundred years and the colonial regimes of Spain, Mexico, and the United States, Maurice S. Crandall’s These People Have Always Been a Republic: Indigenous Electorates in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, 1598–1912 (UNC Press, 2019) demonstrates how Indigenous communities implemented, subverted, rejected, and indigenized colonial ideologie…
 
In Managing Multiculturalism: Indigeneity and the Struggle for Rights in Colombia (Stanford University Press) Jean Jackson narrates her remarkable journey as an anthropologist in Colombia for over 50 years. This is an extraordinary book because it shows us Jackson’s trajectory, the challenges she faced, the changes she underwent as a researcher and…
 
Colorizing Restorative Justice: Voicing Our Realities (Living Justice Press, 2020) consists of stories that have arisen from the lived experiences of a broad range of seasoned, loving restorative justice practitioners of color—mostly women—who have fiercely unearthed realities about devastation caused by white practitioners who have unthinkingly wo…
 
In August 1795, Apaches wiped out two Spanish patrols In the desert borderlands of the what is today the American Southwest and Mexican north. This attack ended what had bene an uneasy peace between various Apache groups and the Spanish Empire. In A Bad Peace and A Good War: Spain and the Mescalero Apache Uprising of 1795-1799 (University of Oklaho…
 
The 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition was in many ways the crowning event of the nineteenth century United States. Held in Chicago, the metropolis of the West, and visited by tens of millions of people from around the world, it showcased America’s past, present, and future. And Indigenous people were there at center stage. In Unfair Labor?: America…
 
Ryan Hall is the author of Beneath the Backbone of the World: Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877, published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2020. Beneath the Backbone of the World tells the story of the Blackfoot (Niitsitapi) people who lived and controlled a large region of what is today the U.S. and Canadi…
 
Professor David Tavárez’s edited volume, Words & Worlds Turned Around: Indigenous Christianities in Colonial Latin America (Boulder: University of Colorado Press, 2017), is a collection of eleven essays from historians and anthropologists grappling with the big questions of the Christianization of Mexico after the Spanish Conquest and using sources…
 
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