Nazi Underground public
[search 0]
×
Best Nazi Underground podcasts we could find (updated June 2020)
Best Nazi Underground podcasts we could find
Updated June 2020
Join millions of Player FM users today to get news and insights whenever you like, even when you're offline. Podcast smarter with the free podcast app that refuses to compromise. Let's play!
Join the world's best podcast app to manage your favorite shows online and play them offline on our Android and iOS apps. It's free and easy!
More
show episodes
 
Plus Three goes deep into the world of drugs, from local decriminalization and emerging psychedelic corporations to leftist politics and mass incarceration. Each week the team and guests attempt to make sense of the complex connections between drugs, science, capitalism, policy, and culture. The podcast is co-hosted by Psymposia co-founder Brian Normand, psychedelics research and bio-ethicist Nese Devenot, evolutionary ecologist Brian Pace, and underground researcher David Nickles.
 
Words of War was an anthology of war stories, "told by the men and women who have seen them happen." It was produced in cooperation with the Council on Books in Wartime, promising "stories of the battlefronts, of behind-the-scenes diplomacy, of underground warfare, of the home front, of action on the seas." Each show was to be "a living record of this war and things for which we fought."
 
In 1991, 2 scooter geeks put together an underground comic book, 'Kinder Nacht', about scooters, mods, nazi skinheads, secret agents, and Ska. In the back of each issue was a 1 or 2 page listing of ska albums and show reviews entitled Ska-t's Scenic Drive. A few years later, after some pushing from a certain human serviette, the radio show was born on CiTR 101.9FM
 
Loading …
show series
 
Not long after Antarctica recorded some its highest-ever temperatures, I joined a group of scientists studying how human activity is transforming the continent. It wasn’t what we saw that was most astonishing – but what we heard. By Jonathan Watts. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
For the next couple of months we will be raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. First up is Tom Lamont’s 2015 account of one London pub’s fight for survival: Across the country, pubs are being shuttered at an alarming rate – scooped up by developers and ra…
 
Following his previous in-depth account of the early days of the outbreak, Edinburgh GP Gavin Francis reports on how he and his practice have dealt with the escalating crisis since lockdown. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodBy The Guardian
 
Low-paid women in US poultry factories are leading the struggle for fair conditions and basic safety. As Covid-19 rips through plants across the country, they have a fight on their hands. By Mya Frazier. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodBy The Guardian
 
The Guardian has launched a brand new podcast series, Forgotten stories of football, which is something like a football version of Audio Long Reads – some of the best tales from the beautiful game that you might not have heard before, written by some of the world’s leading sports journalists. In this episode, the second in the series: few had expec…
 
Sexual abuse in psychedelic therapy (above and underground) is a long-standing, documented, and enduring reality maintained through cultures of silence, coercion, and victim blame. The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) has received complaints about therapists affiliated with their clinical trials and integration list. In …
 
Schools in northern Italy were the first in Europe to close. Since then, teachers, parents and kids across the country have all had to adapt to a new existence – and the results have surprised everyone. By Tobias Jones. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodBy The Guardian
 
Disney’s new streaming service arrived in the UK just as the coronavirus lockdown kicked in. With so many hours to fill, it seemed like a sensible investment. Pretty soon, it was infiltrating my every waking hour. By Sophie Elmhirst. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
On this episode we talk with Douglas Rushkoff, author, teacher, and host of the Team Human podcast. Rushkoff’s work explores how different technological environments change our relationship to narrative, money, power, and each other. His latest book, also called Team Human, calls for the retrieval of human autonomy in a digital age. Rushkoff is als…
 
Times of upheaval are always times of radical change. Some believe the pandemic is a once-in-a-generation chance to remake society and build a better future. Others fear it may only make existing injustices worse. By Peter C Baker. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
A decade ago, violent racists exploited a national crisis and entered mainstream politics in Greece. The party has since been caught up in the biggest trial of Nazis since Nuremberg, and is now crumbling – but its success remains a warning. By Daniel Trilling. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
In the midst of increasing global engagement with the fallout of the novel coronavirus, we examine some responses to the pandemic within the "psychedelic community.” Recognizing that the US has a longstanding history of privatizing profits while socializing costs, we also discuss the normalization of a "capitalist animism"—treating social phenomena…
 
In our time of climate crisis and inequality, as top chefs dream less of Michelin stars and more of changing the world, the New Nordic movement is reaching beyond haute cuisine into classrooms, supermarkets and parliaments. By Kieran Morris. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
For decades, US law enforcement has used ‘forensic hypnosis’ to help solve crimes – yet despite growing evidence that it is junk science, this method is still being used to send people to death row. By Ariel Ramchandani. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodBy The Guardian
 
Loading …
Google login Twitter login Classic login