show episodes
 
The University of Oxford is home to an impressive range and depth of research activities in the Humanities. TORCH | The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities is a major new initiative that seeks to build on this heritage and to stimulate and support research that transcends disciplinary and institutional boundaries. Here we feature some of the networks and programmes, as well as recordings of events, and offer insights into the research that they make possible.
 
The Middle East Centre, founded in 1957 at St Antony’s College is the centre for the interdisciplinary study of the modern Middle East in the University of Oxford. Centre Fellows teach and conduct research in the humanities and social sciences with direct reference to the Arab world, Iran, Israel and Turkey, with particular emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. However, during our regular Friday seminar series, attracting a wide audience, our distinguished speakers bring topics ...
 
The Department of Statistics at Oxford is a world leader in research including computational statistics and statistical methodology, applied probability, bioinformatics and mathematical genetics. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Oxford's Mathematical Sciences submission was ranked overall best in the UK. This is an exciting time for the Department. We have now moved into our new home on St Giles and we are currently settling in. The new building provides improved lecture and ...
 
A selection of seminars and special lectures on wide-ranging topics relating to practical ethics. The Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics was established in 2002 with the support of the Uehiro Foundation on Ethics and Education of Japan. It is an integral part of the philosophy faculty of Oxford University, one of the great centres of academic excellence in philosophical ethics.
 
Fantasy Literature has emerged as one of the most important genres over the past few decades and now enjoys extraordinary levels of popularity. The impact of Tolkien’s Middle-earth works and the serialisation of George Martin’s ‘Game of Thrones’ books has moved these and their contemporaries into mainstream culture. As the popularity grows so does interest in the roots of fantasy, the main writers and themes, and how to approach these texts. Oxford is a natural home to fantasy literature wit ...
 
Lectures on international law issues by eminent scholars, practitioners and judges of national and international courts. The lecture series is brought to you by the Public International Law Discussion Group, part of the Law Faculty of the University of Oxford, and is supported by the British Branch of the International Law Association and Oxford University Press. Further details of this series can be found on the Public International Law -https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/research-subject-groups/grad ...
 
From Oxford University's Rothermere American Institute, host Professor Adam Smith talks to guests doing world-leading research that sheds light on the United States from the outside in. We ask what forces have shaped the culture and politics of the US, how its role in the world has changed and what it might be in the future. Is America now, or has it ever been, the "last best hope of earth"? Probably not, but plenty of people have thought so. We try to understand why.
 
Welcome to the Oxford Adult ESL Conversations podcast, hosted by Jayme Adelson-Goldstein, co-author of the Oxford Picture Dictionary and series director of the new Step Forward Second Edition. In this podcast series, Jayme is joined by Adult ESL educators, thought leaders, and advocates for candid conversations about topics important to teachers in this dynamic field.
 
The Africa Oxford Initiative (AfOx) is a cross-university platform for all things Africa in Oxford. The overarching vision of AfOx is to make Africa a strategic priority for the University of Oxford, while also building equitable research collaborations between researchers and academics from African institutions and the University of Oxford. Throughout the year AfOx hosts several events and workshops about Africa-focussed research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. T ...
 
A one day conference showcasing the wide variety of research and projects being undertaken by Academics under the Humanities Division at the University of Oxford. From Philosophy and Neuroscience to Politics and International Relations to Literary Analysis and the History of Ideas, Oxford's Humanities Division crosses departments and subjects in its research goals.
 
The inaugural Oxford-India Day took place on 17 June 2011. The event aimed to celebrate the longstanding and varied links between the University and India, and to reinvigorate and strengthen those links. Over 80 external guests, representing Indian business, Indian government, UK government, Indian civil society, journalism, law and academia came to Oxford, exploring cutting-edge collaborative research; the students and staff who have come to Oxford from India; and the outstanding collection ...
 
The Global Thinkers Project, Oxford was launched in 2017 with the aim of reviving silenced voices in the discipline of International Relations (IR). It explores the internationalist thought of individuals who have made significant contributions in international affairs but have been excluded from the discipline due to biases of language, region, and gender. By encouraging IR to 'rethink its thinkers', our project responds to a call for a more inclusive, diverse, and ‘Global IR’, making Oxfor ...
 
Immunology is the study of the body's defence mechanisms, from the barrier of skin to the workings of the cellular immune system. Our Immunology podcasts describe the work of NDM researchers to understand the molecular processes of the immune system, and its role in infection, inflammation, and disease.
 
These oral history interviews, conducted by Georgina Ferry, capture the stories of pioneering women at the forefront of research, teaching and service provision for computing in Oxford, 1950s-1990s. Themes throughout the interviews include career opportunities, gender splits in computing, the origins and development of computing teaching and research in Oxford, as well as development of the University of Oxford's Computing Service and the commercial software house the Numerical Algorithms Gr ...
 
Every year more than 10 million children under the age of five die in developing countries, nearly a million from malaria alone. Every day more than 2500 people die of malaria, most of them children. These are the statistics that help drive the tenacious work of Oxford researchers in tropical medicine. The genesis of Oxford’s involvement goes back to a conversation over a bottle of whiskey, between David Weatherall and Peter Williams, the then Director of the Wellcome Trust, in New York in 1 ...
 
In this series of podcasts we consider the impact of opening up science: allowing both the research community and the public to freely access the results of scientific work. Individuals can be fully informed about medical or environmental research, students worldwide can get access to the latest work, and software agents can roam the vast scientific knowledge base seeking patterns and correlations that no human has observed. Ultimately, it may profoundly change the way science is done. The r ...
 
Lectures on international law issues by eminent scholars, practitioners and judges of national and international courts. The lecture series is brought to you by the Public International Law Discussion Group, part of the Law Faculty of the University of Oxford, and is supported by the British Branch of the International Law Association and Oxford University Press. Further details of this series can be found on the Public International Law at Oxford website. .
 
Welcome to Chemistry at Oxford! Our M. Chem. topped the subject ranking for Chemistry in the Guardian's University Guide 2014, and no other university can match the simultaneous breadth and depth of the Oxford Chemistry experience. You'll study a four-year course, and spend your final year working full-time on a project with some of the leading researchers in the UK. Fundamental science and blue skies thinking are celebrated here, but so is commercialisation - maybe your work will help launc ...
 
The Oxford Food Governance Group is an interdisciplinary group of researchers from the Institute for Science, Innovation and Society (InSIS), Said Business School, and the Unit for Biocultural Variation and Obesity (UBVO) at the University of Oxford, who share an interest in food governance practices. Looking at the politics of food distribution, sustainability, and governance of the food supply among other topics, this series will look at how we get our food and why it matters.
 
In this fun and informative series Dr Lindsay Turnbull, Associate Professor and Fellow of The Queen’s College, Oxford University, looks at the biology of the back garden. This series is recorded hot off the press in a normal garden in England beginning in March 2020 and would be of interest to anyone from age 5+. The series is particularly useful for children missing school who would like to carry on practical work in their own garden and have an expert help them understand the theory behind ...
 
Vaccines save millions of lives each year; however, some of the world's worst diseases are still difficult to prevent. Our series of podcasts on Epidemics and Vaccines detail the research within NDM to combat diseases such as hepatitis, influenza and tuberculosis, through development of novel vaccines and vaccine delivery mechanisms and strategies. Developing countries and vulnerable populations are a particular focus of some of this work.
 
Translational and Clinical Medicine is the ongoing effort to bring basic science from the bench to the patient, as well as to elucidate safety and effectiveness of the medicines on which we depend. The NDM podcasts on translational and clinical medicine detail our work in this wide-ranging field, from the identification and design of new medicines to clinical trials and trial design and regulation.
 
The study of populations and demographics is explained in detail in this introductory series by Professor David Coleman, Professor of Demography. Using statistics gathered from censuses, parish records and other sources, Professor Coleman looks at the ways in which populations rise and fall through history. This series is at an introductory level and individuals need no prior knowledge of analyzing statistics or mathematics.
 
This podcast series presents recordings of talks given at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History as part of its public programme of events. The Museum of Natural History was founded in 1860, and today it holds an internationally significant collection of natural history specimens and archives. Housed in a stunning neo-Gothic building inspired by the Pre-Raphaelites, the Museum is home to a lively programme of research, teaching and public events.
 
What do medicine and translation have in common? In what sense, and to what extent, is translation used in contexts as different as the transfer of meaning from one language (or medium) to the other, the concept of knowledge translation, and the process of protein synthesis? How will a nuanced understanding of translation help us live a healthier, happier and longer life? In this newly-launched seminar series, we will explore these questions in an interdisciplinary way, with the aim to endor ...
 
The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford is the largest university library system in the United Kingdom. It includes the principal University library - the Bodleian Library - which has been a legal deposit library for 400 years; as well as 28 other libraries across Oxford including major research libraries and faculty, department and institute libraries. Together, the Libraries hold more than 12 million printed items, over 80,000 e-journals and outstanding special collections inclu ...
 
Reimagine is a new and original podcast series from the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at Oxford University’s Said Business School, presented by Peter Drobac. In this series we meet the visionaries, the disruptors, the world’s problem-solvers, who are taking up the challenge of fixing the bits of our world that are broken. The people who see things differently, and we need them now more than ever.
 
This two-day conference provided a forum for academics, practitioners and government representatives to evaluate the current debate and future shape of the post-2015 agenda from a human rights perspective. It was focused on both theoretical and practical aspects of integrating human rights in the post-2105 agenda, with a particular focus on poverty, environment and peace and security.
 
A series of 8 lectures on General Philosophy, delivered to first year Oxford University undergraduates in Michaelmas term 2018. The lectures cover six main topics: Knowledge and Scepticism, Induction, Mind and Body, Personal Identity, Free Will, God and Evil. But they set these topics within a much broader context, encompassing humanity’s history of discovery about the natural world (both in physics and biology), and our place within it (linked to issues of both evolution and morality). Main ...
 
From a magician who inspired Shakespeare, and poems woven into Japanese prints, to manuscripts illuminated with the ancient love story of Layla and Majnun, this new podcast series will delve into the poetry and literature hidden in the collections at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. Join us each Friday, from 5 February, for a new audio adventure. Objects Out Loud is produced and presented by Lucie Dawkins.
 
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show series
 
Distinguished Speaker Seminar - Friday 18th June 2021, with Susan Murphy, Professor of Statistics and Computer Science, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Reinforcement Learning provides an attractive suite of online learning methods for personalizing interventions in a Digital Health. However after a reinforcement …
 
Graduate Lecture - Thursday 3rd June 2021, with Dr Fergus Boyles. Department of Statistics, University of Oxford. Drug discovery is a long and laborious process, with ever growing costs and dwindling productivity making it ever more difficult to bring new medicines to the market in an affordable and timely fashion. There is a long history of applyi…
 
Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report. Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report. In this episode we look at the main findings…
 
In this podcast David talks with Grand van Ulbrich about a recently published paper detailing a new personal change model, or more rightly, two models - Scared - So What. For full notes, diagrams of the models and Grants details go to: https://www.oxford-review.com/personal-change-model/By The Oxford Review
 
This podcast is the second in the two-part UNAJUA series unpacking the question, "What does it take for a Ugandan research insights startup to become a commercial success?" presented by founder and researcher Peter Kisadha.In this episode, Peter speaks on whether it's possible for an African research insights company to be commercially viable and p…
 
Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities. This panel discussion and conversation with artist Khaled Kaddal examines The Formula of Giving Heart as a piercing study of our contemporary socio-political environment. Drawing from a variety of theoretical and cre…
 
TORCH Goes Digital! presents a series of weekly live events Big Tent - Live Events! Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities. Under the Rainbow: Voices from Lockdown will feature the author James Attlee in discussion with Marina Warner and Professor Pablo Mu…
 
An interview with Catherine McIlwaine on the Tolkien archive at Bodley and the exhibition of 2018 - Part 1. Interview with Catherine McIlwaine, the Tolkien Archivist, by Stuart Lee on the Tolkien archive at Bodley. Part one contains details about the history of the archive, its relationship to the collection at Marquette University, how the collect…
 
Dr Orkideh Behrouzan (SOAS University of London), gives a talk for the Middle East Centre seminar series on 21st May 2021, chaired by Edmund Herzig (Faculty of Oriental Studies). Discussant: Dr Maziyar Ghiabi (University of Exeter). Iran has been one of the worst hit countries by the Coronavirus pandemic, while its pandemic response has been shaped…
 
In this first episode of series 2 of Word Up with Helen Prince, Helen and Zoe Enser discuss metacognitive learning and how this can motivate students to feel empowered, helping them to build independence and resilience, and become lifelong learners. Zoe Enser was a teacher of English for over twenty years, a middle and senior leader and is currentl…
 
In this special bonus episode (the first of a two-part conversation), Socialstack Co-founder and CEO Andrew Berkowitz joins African Tech Roundup Co-founder and Executive Producer Andile Masuku to unpack the rationale behind the launch of the $ATRU token—which the two organisations have partnered to launch on the Celo blockchain.Check out the press …
 
Shivaike Shah hosts a podcast series with the artists and academics on the team in order to create a dialogue with potential audiences. The podcasts discuss the collaborations on Medea and explores the work of each guest beyond the ‘Medea’ project. Supported by the Humanities Cultural Programme and the Arts Council England…
 
This UNAJUA podcast the first of a two-part series highlighting ecosystem insight gaps that African research startups might help to address. Presenting the series is Ugandan founder and researcher Peter Kisadha. Peter has just recently joined early-stage investment outfit Future Africa as an associate researcher. He previously worked for the mobili…
 
Has the "American Dream" died? If the "dream" is one of a confident expectation of increasing affluence across generations, then perhaps it has. While politicians in both parties talk about a crisis of the "middle class", young people in America now find it harder to get on the property ladder, to go to College, and even to make ends meet week by w…
 
In this episode, Walter A. Friedman introduces American business history and its evolution since the early 20th century when the United States was first described as a ‘business civilization’. Learn more about “American Business History: A Very Short Introduction” here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/american-business-history-a-very-short-…
 
Professor Gopal Sreenivasan delivers a New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar on the topic of Informed Consent. This talk develops a novel argument to show that prospective research subjects can validly consent to participate in a study without understanding (most of) the content of the required disclosure. Its point of departure is the right subjects…
 
In this final instalment of our UNAJUA learning series themed: "Is the African technology ecosystem at an inflection point?" Nigerian analyst and researcher Derin Adebayo unpacks what is driving the increase in capital flowing into Africa's tech ecosystem. Derin also suggests what the various types of money making its way into the market might sign…
 
In this episode David talks with Guy Lubitsh, co-author of the new book Connect: How to resolve conflict, improve communication, strengthen relationships about how people can improve their communication and relationships. For full notes, links, a transcript and more go to: https://www.oxford-review.com/better-relationships-connect-interview/…
 
In this episode of AJCN In Press, AJCN’s Inaugural Dennis M. Bier Young Career Editor, Kevin C. Klatt, PhD, RD chats with YuHan Chiu, MD, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Epidemiology at Harvard University. Dr. Chiu is a fellow in the laboratory of Miguel Hernán, MD, DrPH, and the Kolokotrones Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiol…
 
In this podcast we look at how one of the world's leading newsrooms uses data to inform various steps of the newsmaking process in order to engage with audiences and drive subscriptions. In this podcast we look at how one of the world's leading newsrooms uses data to inform various steps of the newsmaking process in order to engage with audiences a…
 
In this episode, Peter Holland introduces the animal kingdom and explains how our understanding of the animal world has been vastly enhanced by analysis of DNA and the study of evolution and development in recent years. Learn more about The Animal Kingdom: A Very Short Introduction here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/american-business-his…
 
This UNAJUA installment features Nigerian analyst and researcher, Derin Adebayo's second "minimum actionable response" to the question:"Is the African technology ecosystem at an inflection point?"In this podcast (the second in a three-part series), Derin shares what he reckons the founders of Africa’s first generation of internet startups have lear…
 
Benjamin Guedj, University College London, gives a OxCSML Seminar on 26th March 2021. Abstract: PAC-Bayes is a generic and flexible framework to address generalisation abilities of machine learning algorithms. It leverages the power of Bayesian inference and allows to derive new learning strategies. I will briefly present the key concepts of PAC-Ba…
 
What are we to make of the most famous of American Paradoxes: that Thomas Jefferson, who claimed as a "self-evident truth" the principle that "all men are created equal" was a slaveholder? In this episode, Adam discusses this problem with Pullitzer prize-winning historian Annette Gordon-Reed. With the US undergoing one of the most profound racial r…
 
In this episode Nick Groom introduces the Gothic, a wildly diverse term which has a far-reaching influence across culture and society, from ecclesiastical architecture to cult horror films and political theorists to contemporary fashion. Learn more about The Gothic: A Very Short Introduction here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-gothic-…
 
In this episode of our series Word Up with Helen Prince, Helen chats to Sophie Bartlett about her experiences of being a primary Year 5/6 teacher. Sophie shares some great tips on how to use vocabulary in mixed year groups and explains how she successfully teaches whole class reading. Sophie also talks about how she uses Twitter as a positive way t…
 
Welcome to the first episode of African Tech Roundup's new learning podcast series called Unajua. The word 'unajua' is a word in KiSwahili that means "do you know?"Here's how the Unajua Series will work... First, we'll crowdsource pertinent questions from you, The Village, and break them down into 3 to 6 bite-sized sub-questions. Then, we'll invite…
 
In January, Oxford University Press announced its support for SHAPE, a new collective name for the humanities, arts, and social sciences and an equivalent term to STEM. SHAPE stands for Social Sciences, Humanities, and the Arts for People and the Economy and aims to underline the value that these disciplines bring to society. Over the last year or …
 
A New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, with Professor Maureen Kelley. Much of global health research occurs against the backdrop of severe, intersectional and structural vulnerabilities, where susceptibility to disease and early death are driven by poverty, and related factors such as political conflict and climate change. Global health research pr…
 
Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities. Named after the original title of Richard Rathbone's book on Nana Ofori Atta I, the King of Akyem Abuakwa in Ghana, this talk will be the first that celebrates the paperback edition of Nana Oforiatta Ayim's celebrate…
 
Has America lost its allure to the rest of the world? Has it lost its confidence, its optimism, its sense of openness? In this episode, Adam talks to Nick Bryant, the BBC correspondent in New York and author of When America Stopped Being Great about the changing image of the US between the 1980s and the present. The two discuss whether America stil…
 
Elise Busset, an undergraduate at Oxford University, reads an extract from Madam Bovary in french. Blog post by Professor Jennifer Yee. The heroine of Gustave Flaubert’s 1857 novel Madame Bovary, Emma, is the daughter of a farmer, who has been educated ‘above her station’ alongside aristocratic girls in a convent. She read Romantic novels, some of …
 
Eleanor Gilbert, an undergraduate at Oxford University, reads an extract from Madam Bovary in english. Blog post by Professor Jennifer Yee. The heroine of Gustave Flaubert’s 1857 novel Madame Bovary, Emma, is the daughter of a farmer, who has been educated ‘above her station’ alongside aristocratic girls in a convent. She read Romantic novels, some…
 
Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future, Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities on Thursday 13th May 2021. Join us for a fascinating evening with award-winning playwright and actress Lolita Chakrabarti in conversation with journalist Matt Wolf. Streamed live from an Oxford venue and chaired by D…
 
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