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Best Political Science podcasts we could find (updated February 2020)
Best Political Science podcasts we could find
Updated February 2020
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Ever wanted to know how music affects your brain, what quantum mechanics really is, or how black holes work? Do you wonder why you get emotional each time you see a certain movie, or how on earth video games are designed? Then you’ve come to the right place. Each week, Sean Carroll will host conversations with some of the most interesting thinkers in the world. From neuroscientists and engineers to authors and television producers, Sean and his guests talk about the biggest ideas in science, ...
 
In politics, you’re often told not to get lost in the weeds. But we love the weeds! That’s where politics becomes policy – the stuff that shapes our lives. Every Tuesday and Friday, Matthew Yglesias is joined by Ezra Klein, Dara Lind, Jane Coaston and other Vox voices to dig into the weeds on important national issues, including healthcare, immigration, housing, and everything else that matters. Produced by Vox and the Vox Media Podcast Network.
 
Most people have no idea what's hiding behind their favorite things. We dig deep into everything from charities to the Founding Fathers to the Bible, and turn up disturbing stories and salacious details. From the Space Race to the Wizard of Oz, there might just be a dark side to everything. The Dark Side Of​ is a production of Cutler Media and part of the Parcast Network.
 
The Cracked Podcast is facts, jokes, and more from the Internet’s leading comedy website. Every week, host Alex Schmidt brings together comedians, authors, scientists, and Cracked staffers, to celebrate the awesome truth that being alive is more interesting than people think it is. Fill your week and your brain with hilarious, mind-blowing revelations that’ll make you the most interesting person in every room you’re in. Looking for the archives? All episodes older than 6 months can be found ...
 
No Jargon, the Scholars Strategy Network’s weekly podcast, presents interviews with top university scholars on the politics, policy problems, and social issues facing the nation. Powerful research, intriguing perspectives -- and no jargon. Find show notes and plain-language research briefs on hundreds of topics at www.scholarsstrategynetwork.org/nojargon.
 
The old forms of the left are moribund the new forms are stupid. We're making a podcast that talks about the need to organize pessimism and develop a Marxist salvage project that might be able to cobble something together in time to save the world...A clean, honest, and unsentimental melancholy is required; we've cultivated one and would like to share it with you.
 
Guns and Butter investigates the relationships among capitalism, militarism and politics. Show list: http://gunsandbutter.snappages.com/archived-show-list.htm. Maintaining a radical perspective in the aftermath of the September 11th attacks, Guns and Butter reports on who wins and who loses when the economic resources of civil society are diverted toward global corporatization, war, and the furtherance of a national security state. Subscribe free to the newsletter at: http://www.gunsandbutte ...
 
At a time when our nation is portrayed as increasingly polarized, media often ignore viewpoints and stories that are worthy of attention. American Thought Leaders, hosted by The Epoch Times Senior Editor Jan Jekielek, features in-depth discussions with some of America’s most influential thought leaders on pertinent issues facing our nation today. #politics #government #donaldtrump #trump
 
We are living through history, but keeping up with the unending stream of revelations, statements, tweets, and disputes is already difficult enough. If we’re going to understand this inquiry–and this presidency–we need to slow down the news cycle long enough to separate the signal from the noise. Every Saturday, Ezra Klein will do just that – through deep conversations with Vox reporters and leading policy voices about what’s going on, why it matters, and where it leaves us now.
 
All Things Co-op is a bi-weekly podcast produced by Democracy at Work that explores everything co-op. From theoretical and philosophical conversations about political economy and the relations of production, to on-the-ground interviews with cooperative workers, All Things Coop aims to appeal to a wide audience of activists, organizers, workers, and students to be better educated and motivated to creating a new cooperative society.
 
The Lowy Institute is an independent, nonpartisan international policy think tank located in Sydney, Australia. The Institute provides high-quality research and distinctive perspectives on foreign policy trends shaping Australia and the world. On Soundcloud we host podcasts from our events with high-level guest speakers as well as our own experts. Essential listening for anyone seeking to better understand foreign policy challenges!
 
Overwhelmed by the political news cycle every week? We get it — that’s why we’re ‘keeping the fun but losing all the drama’ of politics! Party Politics podcast is hosted by Brandon Rottinghaus and Jeronimo Cortina, two smart and sassy University of Houston political science professors, who deliver a friendly, funny, and casually informative recap of the week’s biggest political news stories. Join the conversation on Twitter @HPMPolitics; use #PartyPoliticsPod to ask Brandon and Jeronimo ques ...
 
It is Professor Giordano’s passion that led him to start The P.A.S. Report. Sick of an advocacy news media that wants to dictate how to think, Professor Giordano started The P.A.S. Report because of his unique ability to breakdown complex political issues and explaining those issues in a way to appeal to everyday Americans. By introducing facts, the listeners can come to their own conclusions. The P.A.S. Report differentiates itself by bringing a fresh educational perspective to the national ...
 
Listen to events at Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. Speakers and interviewees include distinguished authors, government and UN officials, economists, policymakers, and businesspeople. Topics range from the ethics of war and peace, to the place of religion in politics, to issues at the forefront of global social justice. To learn more about our work and to explore a wealth of related resources, please visit our website at http://www.carnegiecouncil.org.
 
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How does the world of book reviews work? In Inside the Critics’ Circle: Book Reviewing in Uncertain Times (Princeton University Press, 2020), Phillipa Chong, assistant professor in sociology at McMaster University, provides a unique sociological analysis of how critics confront the different types of uncertainty associated with their practice. The …
 
Why is Garett Jones willing to write books about risky topics like the case for reducing democratic accountability? Is it the iconoclastic Mason econ culture? Supportive colleagues like Tyler? Those help, but what ultimately gives Garett peace of mind is that he’ll never have to go hungry because he has a broad and deep knowledge of econometric too…
 
The Roots of Our Partisan Divide- Christopher Caldwell Watch this speech at- https://youtu.be/YuGziWtfMNk Hillsdale College Christopher Caldwell is a contributing editor at the Claremont Review of Books and a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times. A graduate of Harvard College, his essays, columns, and reviews appear in The Wall Street…
 
How has the media industry changed over the last 30 years? Can media bias be empirically measured? Despite the information revolution, how are people actually getting less information instead of more? How have social media and big tech transformed the media landscape and American politics? In this episode, we'll sit down with Brent Bozell, the foun…
 
The history of women's political involvement has focused heavily on electoral politics, but throughout the twentieth century women engaged in grassroots activism when they found it increasingly challenging to feed their families and balance their household ledgers. Politics of the Pantry: Housewives, Food, and Consumer Protest in Twentieth-Century …
 
An orphaned young woman disguises herself as a boy in order to escape the dangers of being alone in 1870’s San Francisco. A group of castoffs destroy the bird population of the Farallon Island by stealing and selling their eggs. A young woman raped in the 1980’s struggles to raise her daughter on her own while her unattached best friend becomes a f…
 
From an undergraduate perspective, coming from the rigid proofs and concrete constructions of middle- or high-school courses, the broad discipline of geometry can be at once intimately familiar and menacingly exotic. For most of its history, and perhaps for many of the same reasons, geometers struggled to come to terms with the unsolved problems, u…
 
In Phenomenal Justice: Violence and Morality in Argentina (Rutgers University Press, 2020), Eva van Roekel grounds her research in phenomenological anthropology and the anthropology of emotion to offer readers a novel and compelling perspective on justice proceedings in the aftermath of historical crimes against humanity. Van Roekel approaches the …
 
In her new book Fat, Pretty, and Soon to Be Old: A Makeover for Self and Society (AK Press 2019), sociologist and storyteller Kimberly Dark considers what it means to look a certain way. Integrating memoir with cultural critique, Dark describes her experience navigating the world as a fat, queer, white-privileged, gender-conforming, eventually disa…
 
Black New Jersey 1664 to the Present Day (Rutgers University Press, 2018) by Graham Russell Gao Hodges, George Langdon, Jr. Professor of History and Africana and Latin American Studies at Colgate University in Hamilton, New York, is a survey history of African Americans in New Jersey. This is the first published scholarly book-length historical stu…
 
When all else fails, go back to the Russia hoax accusations. For over 3 years, Americans have had to sit through the endless talk of Russia and it’s starting again. The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, and expecting a different result. Well, perhaps the Democrats have gone insane by reintroducing Russia. In a pred…
 
What prevents someone from affiliating with a political party? What is the ideology of an independent? And how can these voters exist in a two party system? Walking us through the world of the party outsiders is political scientist Samara Klar, head of IndependentVoting.org, Jacqueline Salit and president of New Hampshire Independent Voters, Tiani …
 
The spread of the novel coronavirus in and beyond China has potentially profound implications, for Xi Jinping's standing and China's global weight and prestige. For countries like Australia, the virus has already inflicted a sharp economic shock.The Lowy Institute hosted a panel discussion on the impact of the virus on Australia and the world. Nata…
 
Imagining Religious Communities: Transnational Hindus and their Narrative Performances (Oxford University Press, 2019) tells the story of the Gupta family through the personal and religious narratives they tell as they create and maintain their extended family and community across national borders. Based on ethnographic research, the book demonstra…
 
Franny Choi’s book-length collection of poetry, Soft Science (Alice James Books 2019), explores queer, Asian American femininity through the lens of robots, cyborgs, and artificial intelligence. As she notes in this interview, “this book is a study of softness,” exploring feeling, vulnerability, and desire. How can you be tender and still survive i…
 
How does the world of book reviews work? In Inside the Critics’ Circle: Book Reviewing in Uncertain Times (Princeton University Press, 2020), Phillipa Chong, assistant professor in sociology at McMaster University, provides a unique sociological analysis of how critics confront the different types of uncertainty associated with their practice. The …
 
International bestselling author Douglas Murray examines in his latest book The Madness of Crowds: Gender, Race and Identity (Bloomsbury Continuum, 2019) the twenty-first century's most divisive issues: sexuality, gender, technology and race. He reveals the astonishing new culture wars playing out in our workplaces, universities, schools and homes …
 
"It was not death she feared. It was misunderstanding.” This line from Zora Neale Hurston’s masterpiece, Their Eyes Were Watching God, captures what is at the heart of all great literature: the irrepressible urge to speak, to be heard and understood. I spoke with Professor Deborah Plant, a scholar of African-American literature and culture, an expe…
 
Who were the ‘sons of God’ in the book of Genesis—and what did they do? The elusive text of Genesis 6:1-4, with its references to ‘sons of God,’ ‘daughters of men,’ and ‘giants,’ has perplexed interpreters for ages. In his book The Sons of God in Genesis 6:1-4 (Brill, 2019), Jaap Doedens offers a comprehensive history and analysis of the various pr…
 
What is overconfidence? We tend to know it when we see it, but the concept is increasingly hard to nail down the more you think about it. In this Stuff to Blow Your Mind two-parter, Robert and Joe explore the mythic roots of hubris, the psychology of overconfidence and its role in society and business. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://ne…
 
Over the course of a week, Trudeau changed his tune from promising patience and cooperation with Wet'suwet'en land defenders, to asserting the rail blockades must be removed. Why the sudden 180? Plus, Teck withdrew its application for a $20 billion mine project. And four MPs have released the Buffalo Declaration, a manifesto demanding more respect …
 
For my latest podcast, I read my latest EFF Deeplinks post, Gopher: When Adversarial Interoperability Burrowed Under the Gatekeepers’ Fortresses. It’s the latest installment in my case histories of “adversarial interoperability” — once the main force that kept tech competitive. Today, I tell the story of Gopher, the web’s immediate predecessor, whi…
 
On this episode of Red Menace Alyson and Breht discuss The Civil War in France by Karl Marx Free text here: https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx... video version here: https://youtu.be/pqBAhG_5DBk outro music: 'Everything Counts' by Depeche Mode Support Red Menace and get access to bonus monthly content on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/The…
 
UC Berkley's Professor Stuart J. Russell discusses the near- and far-future of artificial intelligence, including self-driving cars, killer robots, governance, and why he's worried that AI might destroy the world. How can scientists reconfigure AI systems so that humans will always be in control? How can we govern this emerging technology across bo…
 
Bernie's Disturbing Sexual Views. https://youtu.be/qSbO491f1HM Mr Reagan Celebrity News Host "Bill O'Reilly" wants to show YOU how he made Millions for himself! http://www.wealthwithbill.com Click Here ^^^ To Watch the FREE Video how! 💰💸 DONATE Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/mrreagan Subscribstar: https://www.subscribestar.com/mrreagan Paypal: ht…
 
What does the coronavirus outbreak reveal about the priorities of the Chinese communist regime? How are US companies in China being impacted? And how does all this intersect with the Chinese regime’s extensive influence operations in the US? This is American Thought Leaders 🇺🇸, and I’m Jan Jekielek. In this episode, we'll sit down with political co…
 
It’s hard to make decisions that will change your life. It’s even harder to make a decision if you know that the outcome could change who you are. Our preferences are determined by who we are, and they might be quite different after a decision is made — and there’s no rational way of taking that into account. Philosopher L.A. Paul has been investig…
 
Ariella Aisha Azoulay argues that the institutions that make our world, from archives and museums to ideas of sovereignty and human rights to history itself, are all dependent on imperial modes of thinking. Imperialism has segmented populations into differentially governed groups, continually emphasized the possibility of progress while trying to d…
 
Elements of Visual Design in the Landscape (Routledge, 2019) presents a vocabulary of visual design, structured in a logical and easy to follow sequence. It is profusely illustrated using both abstract and real examples taken from a wide range of international locations together with cross referencing between related principles and case studies dem…
 
How has the expansion of the Black American middle class and the increase in the number of Black immigrants among them since the Civil Rights period transformed the cultural landscape of New York City? In her new book The New Noir: Race, Identity & Diaspora in Black Suburbia (University of California Press, 2019), Orly Clergé explores this question…
 
The definition of medical necessity has morphed over the years, from a singular physician’s determination to a complex and dynamic political contest involving patients, medical companies, insurance companies, and government agencies. In Medical Necessity: Health Care Access and the Politics of Decision Making (University of Minnesota Press, 2019), …
 
What does the future hold for the Midwest? A vast stretch of fertile farmland bordering one of the largest concentrations of fresh water in the world, the Midwestern US seems ideally situated for the coming challenges of climate change. But it also sits at the epicenter of a massive economic collapse that many of its citizens are still struggling t…
 
Adam Frankel is a former senior speechwriter for President Barack Obama. He joins David to discuss his new memoir, “The Survivors: A Story of War, Inheritance, and Healing.” The book is a remarkable story of family secrets, intergenerational trauma, and the process of coming to terms with life-changing revelations. He and David also discuss his fam…
 
The definition of medical necessity has morphed over the years, from a singular physician’s determination to a complex and dynamic political contest involving patients, medical companies, insurance companies, and government agencies. In Medical Necessity: Health Care Access and the Politics of Decision Making (University of Minnesota Press, 2019), …
 
Published by intellect books in 2016, and currently distributed by The University of Chicago Press, Entering Transmasculinity: The Inevitability of Discourse is a holistic study of the intersecting and overlapping discourses that shape the identities of people who were assigned the female sex at birth and do not identify with that designation. Usin…
 
If you live in America, chances are good you’ve heard the term “mental health crisis” bandied about in the media. While true that anxiety, depression, and other mood disorders seem to be on the rise—especially among young people—resources for addressing them remain scarce and stigmatized, and the conditions themselves remain poorly understood. Even…
 
We may find evidence of alien life someday. That would be amazing right? It'd be great and exciting and maybe terrifying. But here’s the thing about that: you won’t properly appreciate that evidence if your head is full of Area 51 junk and Roswell nonsense and a ludicrous belief that octopuses come from outer space. So on this week’s episode of The…
 
Professor Michael Iasilli joins The P.A.S. Report to discuss a wide array of issues including nationalism, the state of the Democrat party, healthcare, and labor. The concept of nationalism has been maligned over the last decade, and some have incorrectly tied the attempted to introduce a racial component to nationalism. Professor Giordano has alwa…
 
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