Scientists Walk Into A Bar public
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Learn about sharks, sawfish, and what it's like to be a marine biologist in this interview with Jasmin Graham. Also, find out more about Jasmin's work as the President and CEO of Minorities in Shark Sciences (MISS). SkypeAScientist.com ******** Help support the podcast and live Science on Tap events! Make a one-time donation to Make You Think OR If…
 
Listen as we have a fun conversation about death with mortician and activist Caitlin Doughty about her book Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs? that is now out in paperback! We discuss why it's important to talk to kids about death, what she thinks about Halloween decorations, and the worst thing about her work (hint: it has nothing to do with dead people…
 
In this episode we talk with Dr. Nicole Michel, Senior Quantitative Ecologist with the National Audubon Society and find out a little bit about what it's like to study birds. Also check out eBird and help do science in your neighborhood! Watch Nicole's Science on Tap talk on Hope Is The Thing With Feathers: Finding Joy in Birds recorded on April 23…
 
You've probably heard of Jack Daniel's whiskey, but did you know that brand wouldn't exist if it weren't for Nearest Green, the first Black master distiller on record? In this episode we talk to Sailor Guevara, brand ambassador for Uncle Nearest Whiskey all about the science and history of whiskey. It’s also a story of slavery, emancipation, family…
 
In this episode we get another chance to talk to Dr. Ainissa Ramirez, materials scientist and author of the book The Alchemy of Us: How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another. We learn more about her background, what a materials scientist does, and why she calls herself a "science evangelist." Here are some suggestions on how to buy the book (th…
 
In this episode we have a long and fascinating conversation with epidemiologist Dr. Frank Franklin about the current pandemic, racism, poverty, public health, the Black Lives Matter protests, and what it's like to navigate the world as an African American scientist. Dr. Franklin is the Principal Epidemiologist & Director of the Epidemiology, Analyt…
 
In this episode we have a conversation with Dr. Eseosa Ighodaro, MD, PhD, a neurologist and a neuroscientist. Find out about what inspired her to study brains, what it's like to get an MD and a PhD at the same time, about her interest in studying the medical effects of racism on People of Color, and how she's teaching people about neuroscience. Fin…
 
If you've ever heard the name Frances Glessner Lee you might think "wasn't she that lady who made crime scene dollhouses?" Making dioramas wasn't just her hobby; she actually had profound influence on the field of forensic science. We learn a bit about her in this brief interview with her biographer, Bruce Goldfarb. Join us for Science on Tap Onlin…
 
Listen to our short interview with neuroscientist Dr. Larry Sherman from OHSU. He has spoken at MANY previous events, such as Music and the Anxious Brain on April 9, 2020 (this interview took place a few minutes after that event ended), and you can hear podcast episodes of his talks The Neuroscience of Racism, The Neuroscience of PTSD, and The Neur…
 
Find out how bacteria help us digest food, battle disease, and may influence our behavior in Microbes and the Human Gut by Dr. Lisa Sardinia recorded at an event in 2017. Lisa also spoke on High Anxiety: The Gut Microbiota’s Effect on Mental Health at a Science on Tap Online event on May 14, 2020. Resources mentioned at the end of the talk: Some of…
 
Want a real-life adventure story mixed with modern-day science? Listen to this short interview with Gillen D’Arcy Wood, author of Land of Wondrous Cold: The Race to Discover Antarctica and Unlock the Secrets of Its Ice. Pick up and enjoy the book, then join us on Thursday, June 11 for a Science on Tap Online event with Gillen at 7pm Pacific. Find o…
 
What if everything we think we know about cancer is wrong? Listen as Dr. Athena Aktipis, author and Arizona State University professor talks about her new book The Cheating Cell: How Evolution Helps Us Understand and Treat Cancer. Rather than trying to eradicate all cancer, she describes how changing our approach could help us learn to control and …
 
How have simple inventions changed our lives? Learn more in this short interview with Dr. Ainissa Ramirez, materials scientist and author of the book The Alchemy of Us: How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another. Pick up and enjoy the book, then join us on May 21 at 7:00pm Pacific for a Science on Tap Online event with Ainissa! Find out more abo…
 
Is there life on other planets? How would we find out? Listen to a short interview with NASA scientist and author Kevin Peter Hand about his new book Alien Oceans: The Search for Life in the Depths of Space. Pick up and enjoy the book, then join us on May 28 for a Science on Tap Online event with Kevin! Find out more about the live event on Faceboo…
 
Science shows that friends are vital for our mental and physical well-being, and that may be even more true in these strange, pandemic times. Listen as author Lydia Denworth talks about her book Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life’s Fundamental Bond, recorded at a Science on Tap event in February 2020. This talk was …
 
The biological mysteries of age-related diseases have intrigued scientists for decades. In recent years, our expansive knowledge of genetics, thanks to the humble fruit fly, has opened our eyes to the mechanisms underlying these conditions. Now scientists are hoping to apply this knowledge to use the body’s own biological systems to delay the onset…
 
In Season 1, we talked about using biomarkers and big data to match patients with the best treatment for their disease. In this episode, Jane sits down with David Shames, Senior Director of Cancer Immunotherapy Biomarkers and Staff Scientist in Oncology Biomarker Development, and Mark Lee, Senior Vice President and Global Head of Personalized Healt…
 
Our eyes are our windows to the world, but what happens when those windows start to fade or disappear? To understand how the eye works, scientists are combining developments in imaging and genetics to see into the eye and better understand why a disease occurs or whether a treatment is working. Hear from our host Jane Grogan and Menno van Lookeren …
 
It’s easy to think of cancer as an invader to the body. But in reality, it’s simply the result of a few proofreading errors in DNA replication that occur over time when cells divide. In Episode 3, Jane Grogan chats with Fred de Sauvage, Vice President and Staff Scientist, Molecular Oncology, about how just a handful of mutations can make normal cel…
 
Last episode, Jane and colleagues unraveled the intricacies of the human microbiome. This week, Jane chats with Mary Keir, Senior Scientist, Biomarker Discovery OMNI, to learn what happens during inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), what causes it, and how targeting dysfunction in our immune system, the gut epithelial barrier and our microbiome could …
 
Our bodies are full of bacteria - pounds of them actually. We’re kicking off Season 3 with a closer look at the human microbiome and what happens when the synergistic relationship between our cells and our bacteria goes awry. Jane Grogan talks about the latest discoveries in microbiome research with Allyson Byrd, Associate Scientist, Cancer Immunol…
 
Two Scientists Walk Into a Bar is back for a third season with host Jane Grogan chatting with scientists who are leading the charge to understand complex diseases. This season will tackle a range of new topics, including a deep dive into the human microbiome, the latest in multiple sclerosis, asthma and aging, and how Big Data is redefining persona…
 
So far this season we’ve talked about the immune system a lot – how immune cells communicate, traffic along connective tissue, and invasive tumors. But what actually is the immune system? What’s it made of? How does it work? To close out our second season, Jane speaks with Andy Chan, Senior Vice President of Research Biology, to unravel the mysteri…
 
Pharmacology is the study of how a medicine works in the body, which is a critical step in understanding what medicines people should be given, and at what dose and schedule. As we learn more about the complex genomics that make each person unique, the role of pharmacologists is becoming increasingly important for personalizing safe and effective t…
 
Neurons, the cells that make up our brain, are some of the most unique cells in our bodies. The complex nature of how they communicate leads to everything we say, think, or do. That complexity makes it hard to correct neural communication when something goes wrong, as in neurodegenerative diseases. What can we do to fix that? Jane talks to Casper H…
 
The lifecycle of a cell mirrors our own lives – cells live and die as we do. It would be easy to think of cell death, or apoptosis, as a negative action, but the death of a cell is actually critical to many of the important biological functions that keep our bodies running. Learn more about the mysteries behind cell death from Vishva Dixit, M.D., V…
 
Despite the best efforts of the human immune system, viruses and bacteria are constantly evolving to find new ways to breach our bodies’ natural defenses. Over the years, scientists have stepped in to develop novel ways to help the immune system in fighting infectious diseases. It’s a complicated field, which is why in this episode Jane is bringing…
 
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