show episodes
 
Home to the world's largest collection of Shakespeare materials. Advancing knowledge and the arts. Discover it all at www.folger.edu. Shakespeare turns up in the most interesting places—not just literature and the stage, but science and social history as well. Our "Shakespeare Unlimited" podcast explores the fascinating and varied connections between Shakespeare, his works, and the world around us.
 
The Play's the Thing is the ultimate podcast resource for lovers of Shakespeare. Dedicating six episodes to each play (one per act, plus a Q&A episode), this podcast explores the themes, scenes, characters, and lines that make Shakespeare so memorable. In the end, we will cover every play The Bard wrote, thus permitting an ongoing contemplation and celebration of the most important writer of all time. Join us. The Play’s the Thing is presented by The CiRCE Podcast Network. See acast.com/priv ...
 
Was the name signed to the world's most famous plays and poems a pseudonym? Was the man from Stratford that history attributed the work to even capable of writing them? Who was Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, and is there any chance he was the actual author of those legendary works? Who WAS the writer behind the pen name "William Shakespeare?" Join Steven Sabel of the Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship as he and his fellow Oxfordians set out to answer all of those questions and many more on ...
 
The social issues of Shakespeare's day which are featured in his plays (class division, racism, sexuality, intolerance, etc...) are still the burning issues in today's dysfunctional global society. This new and exciting podcast series will explore these social issues, connecting them straight from the page to our modern world. Each episode features panelists from all over the country sharing their expertise as we explore our humanity using Shakespeare as a cornerstone.
 
A Shakespeare scholar talks to actual clever people about what normal domestic activity was like during the life and times of William Shakespeare. Partly informative, and mostly fun, the series aims to shed some light on the lesser discussed aspects of early modern life in England, namely poo, pants, passion and other such ponderings.
 
Oh No! Lit Class is a semi-educational comedy literature podcast hosted by Megan and RJ, two bitter English grads who are here to tell you all the weird and sexy things you never knew about the books you had to read in school. Let's ruin some literary classics together. New episodes released every other Thursday.
 
From the earliest drama in English, to the closing of the theatres in 1642, there was a hell of a lot of drama produced - and a lot of it wasn't by Shakespeare. Apart from a few noble exceptions these plays are often passed over, ignored or simply unknown. This podcast presents full audio productions of the plays, fragmentary and extant, that shaped the theatrical world that shaped our dramatic history.
 
Tabling: The Podcast has partnered with ISC Santa Fe on an audio exploration of Shakespeare’s canon. This project will include five-six episodes of in-depth “table work” discussions about text, character, and dramaturgy for each play (hosted here on Tabling: The Podcast), and uncut radio plays with sound effects and original music (hosted on the Radio Shakespeare Lab podcast). Over 50 actors, directors, and theatre makers from all across the country will be participating in this endeavor. Ne ...
 
Shakespeare's Sonnets, or simply The Sonnets, comprise a collection of 154 poems in sonnet form written by William Shakespeare that deal with such themes as love, beauty, politics, and mortality. The poems were probably written over a period of several years. (Summary from wikipedia)
 
Offering knowledge and tools for appreciating Shakespeare's deep and universal meanings. Series I Short sessions on background information (numbered); Series 2 longer sessions on individual plays and sonnets (lettered). Series I Chapter 1: What's So Great about Shakespeare? (3 sessions) Chapter 2: Shakespeare the Man Chapter 3: Shakespeare's Theater Chapter 4: Shakespeare's Language (4 sessions) Chapter 5: Shakespeare's Characters Chapter 6: Unity in Variety (3 sessions) Chapter 7: Shakespea ...
 
"To Be Or Not To Be" – it’s the most famous speech in all of English drama, but what on earth is Hamlet actually talking about? In this podcast series, we talk to some of the world's leading Shakespearean actors, directors and scholars - and our conversations often end up in the most unexpected of places. This series, made by Emmy Award winning documentary producer Andrew Smith, features contributions from Adrian Lester, Harriet Walter, Sir Mark Rylance, Samuel West and many more. It was rec ...
 
Director Saheem Ali continues his audio exploration of William Shakespeare’s canon for The Public Theater in New York with a new production of ROMEO Y JULIETA, collaborating with playwright Ricardo Pérez González on an adaptation of noted scholar Alfredo Michel Modenessi’s Spanish translation. Actor Lupita Nyong’o plays Julieta, with Juan Castano as her Romeo, in this bilingual Spanish and English production that will bring one of history’s most famed lovers to your homes and phones in a stu ...
 
Featuring interviews with both actors and academics, Shakespeare’s Shadows delves into a single Shakespeare character in each episode. Perspectives from the worlds of academia, theater, and film together shape explorations of the Bard’s shadows, his imitations of life — pretty good imitations, ones that reveal enough of ourselves that we’re still talking about them four centuries later.
 
LibriVox readers present the second collection of monologues from Shakespeare’s plays. Containing 15 parts. William Shakespeare (April 26, 1564 – April 23, 1616) remains widely to be considered the single greatest playwright of all time. He wrote in such a variety of genres - tragedy, comedy, romance, &c - that there is always at least one monologue in each of his plays. Some of these teach a lesson, some simply characterize Shakespeare at his best, some are funny, some sad, but all are very ...
 
This personal anthology is my choice of speeches from Shakespeare that I enjoy reading (that I would like to have had by heart years ago!) and that seem to me to illustrate his unsurpassed use of language. He was a man who seemed to know everything about human nature and as Orson Welles said ‘he speaks to everyone and we all claim him’. I know that it has been said that ‘it is impossible to be a great Shakespearian actor without an idiosyncratic and extraordinary voice’ and this may be so, b ...
 
Packed with trivia, comedy and celebrity guests, Ask Me Another is like an amusement park for your brain. Host Ophira Eisenberg and musician Jonathan Coulton take brilliant contestants on a roller coaster that'll make you laugh and scream (out the answers)—and barely anyone throws up in a trash can.
 
This is truly a delightful compilation of some of the best known and loved passages from William Shakespeare's plays. Most readers would be familiar with all or at least some of them. If you've studied Shakespeare in school or college, plays like The Merchant of Venice and Macbeth were probably assigned texts. However, if you haven't encountered these plays before, Shakespeare Monologues is a great volume to browse through and enjoy at leisure. It's important to know that there is a distinct ...
 
Edith Nesbit, the author of Beautiful Stories from Shakespeare, felt passionately that young children should enjoy Shakespeare's great works. She set about to retell his plays in a language that children would not only understand, but delight in. This is a marvelous introduction to the works of Shakespeare that ALL will enjoy. (Summary by Laura)
 
“One of the Top 10 Podcasts for Theatre Fans!” (Broadway World) Since 2006, this “bright, breezy, & entertaining” (The Telegraph) podcast demystifies the creative process in chats with some of the sharpest and funniest artists in the business: ‘Weird Al’ Yankovic! Brian Dennehy! Playwright Lauren Gunderson! Director Mary Zimmerman! Novelist Christopher Moore! Comedian Rachel Parris! Shakespearean Sir Stanley Wells! And so many less! HEAR HERE!
 
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show series
 
What's in the brain that ink may character Which hath not figur'd to thee my true spirit? What's new to speak, what now to register, That may express my love, or thy dear merit? Nothing, sweet boy, but yet like prayers divine, I must each day say o'er the very same, Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine, Even as when first I hallowed thy fa…
 
We WERE going to call this episode Romantic Shakespeare - but then we realized in a lot of the plays, non-platonic relationships are often UNromantic so.... yeah. So therefore, in this episode, we discuss the believability and viability of the "love" relationships in Shakespeare's plays. Can one really sustain a marriage when you fall in love in le…
 
In a new series dedicated to the connection between the arts and wellbeing, we explore the many ways in which the arts enrich our lives. As we head out of lockdown and back into our beautiful theatres, what role can the arts and theatre play in helping us to tackle mental health issues, in restoring wellbeing, and to help us find expression and con…
 
In this episode of the podcast, we talk to people who have found meaning and a sense of shared experience in Hamlet’s famous soliloquy at the most difficult times of their lives; including dealing with bereavement, traumatic loss and mental health problems. We also talk to Maggie O Farrell, whose recent award-winning novel speculates that the uncan…
 
Steven welcomes his wife, actress Annie Sabel, back to the program to discuss some of their favorite Shakespearean film adaptations, and some of the stinkers they can't bear to watch. From Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet, to Baz Lurman's Romeo & Juliet, Laurence Fishburne as Othello, to Josh Whedon's Much Ado About Nothing and more. Find out which films g…
 
The National Theatre’s new production of "Romeo and Juliet" was meant to premiere in the summer of 2020. But when the COVID-19 pandemic began, Simon Godwin, the production’s director, was tasked with turning it into a 90-minute film shot entirely in the National’s Littleton Theatre.Now, as the film approaches its United States premiere, Godwin sees…
 
Hosted by Jenni Stewart (Associate Artistic Director, Shakespeare Dallas) with guest panelists Daniel Kemper (Master of Casting & Company Management at Rude Grooms and Co-Host of This Wooden O) and Montgomery Sutton (Master of Revels at Rude Grooms and Co-Host of This Wooden O). William Shakespeare lived his entire life in the shadow of the bubonic…
 
Shakespeare's Birthday Month continues with Part Two with our conversation with Dr Edel Semple from University College in Cork, Ireland, and Dr. Ronan Hatfull from the University of Warwick, talking about Shakespearean Biofiction onstage, screen, and this week on the page, too. We share love for both Hamnet the novel by Maggie O’Farrell and Hamnet …
 
In Elizabethan England, the Queen is immortalized in woodcuts that show her fondness for the sport of hawking. By the time James I comes to the throne in 1603, hawking is surpassed by a form of hunting called par force where animals like dogs and horses are used to round up prey. While the practical aspect of hunting animals for meat was utilized i…
 
Nora’s favourite and arguably Shakespeare’s weirdest play takes us to Roman Britain, where we meet a crusty jumper, Jupiter calls an Uber, and for some reason all roads lead to Milford Haven. What’s a love token? You’ll wish you’d never asked… Content Note: Be aware that this play (and this episode) contains depiction and discussions of sexual assa…
 
In the second episode, Anjna discovers the world of pants. Well, what passed for undergarments in early modern England, how they were cleaned, and why any of this matters in Shakespeare's works. Wisdom from Dr Sara Read, Dr Hannah Lilley, Amie Bolissian, Nic Fulcher and Lorna Giltrow-Shaw. Voicework by Catherine Forrester, Jonathan McGarrity and Ri…
 
While it's certainly possible to do Shakespeare without any hint of comedy (and lord knows we've seen a few productions, especially on film, that lean that way), it's also possible to have Shakespeare plays that get the audience rolling in the aisles. This episode we talk all about Shakespeare's comedy - not the comedies, but the sense of humour an…
 
This week host June Thomas talks to TV writer Jed Mercurio, who created the hugely popular UK police procedural Line of Duty and recently executive produced the drama series Bloodlands. In the interview, Jed explains what an executive producer does and discusses some of the signature qualities of his work. He also tells the story of how he became a…
 
Cellist Yo-Yo Ma (Words + Music) talks about performing at a COVID vaccination site. Then, he's quizzed on classical music pieces quoted in pop songs. Chefs Sohla El-Waylly and Stella Parks help Ophira Eisenberg and Jonathan Coulton create dishes from random food items in their pantries. Timothy Simons (Veep) and The Pole producer Theodore Bressman…
 
We’re heading to the finish line of the this history tetralogy…and we’re excited to share Henry V over the next 3 weeks with you, our dear audience! Here is our discussion of Act I. Among many things, we discuss how the chorus activates the audience at the top of the play, the public and private personas of the clergy, we contrast how Henry V is ta…
 
Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul Of the wide world, dreaming on things to come, Can yet the lease of my true love control, Suppos'd as forfeit to a confin'd doom. The mortal moon hath her eclipse endur'd, And the sad augurs mock their own presage, Incertainties now crown themselves assur'd, And peace proclaims olives of endless age. Now w…
 
This week host Isaac Butler talks to Anthony Fortenberry, chief nursing officer at Callen-Lorde Community Health Center, which has been serving the LGBTQ community in New York City for decades. In the interview, Anthony talks about all the creative challenges he and his staff have faced over the past year, from converting a hotel into a quarantine …
 
Reggie Watts (The Late Late Show) and Kate Berlant (POOG podcast) determine whether wellness products are real or fake. From ABC's Home Economics, Sasheer Zamata and Caitlin McGee learn what "holding the candle" means. Plus, Saturday Night Live alum Nasim Pedrad talks about her new TBS sitcom Chad and tries to guess the endings of classic I Love Lu…
 
Series I, Chapter 12: Shakespeare's Other Poems Venus and Adonis The Rape of Lucrece The Phoenix and the Turtle A Lover's Complaint Notes: I have taken some facts and quotations from the following: On The Rape of Lucrece: Hallett Smith, Introduction to The Rape of Lucrece in G. Glakemore Evans, ed., The Riverside Shakespeare, Second Edition (Boston…
 
And thus, we conclude our journey of Henry IV, Part II with our discussion of Act V!We celebrate the return to the country justices and one last drinking scene, we talk Falstaff’s long con and how he loses his heart to Hal in the process, we discuss the demands of of public leadership, status negotiations within the royal family, the incarceration …
 
The search for a historical Gilgamesh is filled with red herrings. As Mesopotamia's best loved epic hero, images of Gilgamesh are littered throughout the ruins of the ancient cities of the Tigris and Euphrates. Ancient documents produced by Kings looking to bolster their image would claim that Gilgamesh was their "friend and brother". But despite t…
 
Dr Edel Semple (bottom right, above) from University College in Cork, Ireland, and Dr. Ronan Hatfull (bottom left) from the University of Warwick convened a seminar entitled “Shakespearean Biofiction on the Stage and Screen” for this year’s annual conference of the Shakespeare Association of America, where we discussed the how and why of, among oth…
 
This week is Part 2 in our 2 part series on John Harington, the man who invented the first flush toilet in England. Our guest, Bob Cromwell, is back again this week to take us back to 16th century England and explore the exciting life of John Harington beyond his invention of the flush toilet. Harington was known as a literary figure, primarily for…
 
We tackle the massive Act IV of Henry IV, Part II.Among many thing we talk about the opacity of specific grievances from the rebellion, the super degraded and violent imagery that the Archbishop employs, how important beverages are and the virtues of drinking, how the King seems to be constantly pulled between his two opposing interpretations of Ha…
 
When in the chronicle of wasted time I see descriptions of the fairest wights, And beauty making beautiful old rhyme In praise of ladies dead and lovely knights, Then in the blazon of sweet beauty's best, Of hand, of foot, of lip, of eye, of brow, I see their antique pen would have express'd Even such a beauty as you master now. So all their praise…
 
This week host June Thomas talks to the activist photographer Joan E. Biren, also known as JEB. In the interview, JEB discusses the creation, funding, and printing of her 1979 photobook Eye to Eye: Portraits of Lesbians, which was recently reissued by Anthology Editions. She also talks about the enduring legacy of the book and what it meant for les…
 
Comedians Demi Adejuyigbe and Gabriel Gundacker rise to the top as they answer trivia questions about bread. Star of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air and host of America's Funniest Home Videos Alfonso Ribeiro talks about his Broadway days, epic fails, and the origins of the iconic Carlton dance. Alex Moffat (Saturday Night Live) and Jen Spyra (Big Time,…
 
The Elizabethan era was a time of great fun and frivolity.... usually involving beating the crap out of someone or something. Seriously. You can't make this shit up. Although........... since this episode was recorded on April 1 - Happy April Fool's Day!! - we did!! Listen to the episode and hit us up via our website or social media and tell us whi…
 
Series II, Podcast S: Henry IV, Part II Promise Fulfilled: Prince Hal becomes King Henry V Defense of Prince John Falstaff's Banishment Note: The Thompson quotation is from Notes on Shakespeare in Philip Thompson, Dusk and Dawn: Poems and Prose of Philip Thompson, ed. Gideon Rappaport (San Diego: One Mind Good Press, 2005), p. 221, 227. Questions? …
 
On to Act III of Henry IV, Part II…We talk about how Shakespeare teaches us that Kings are incapable of sleeping, how both sides in the civil war characterize the opposing side as a disease upon the realm, the introduction of Justice Shallow mixing dialogue about the cost of livestock, reliving youth, profound enumerations of friends gone, and Fals…
 
Steven welcomes author Robert Boog to the program to discuss his work, "Shakey's Madness," which explores evidence in the works of Shakespeare and the life of Edward de Vere suggesting he may have suffered from a mental disorder. Support the show by picking up official Don't Quill the Messenger merchandise at www.dontquillthepodcast.com Presented b…
 
Today, the texts of roughly three thousand plays from the great age of Elizabethan theater are lost to us. The plays that remain constitute only a sixth of all of the drama produced during that period. How do we make sense of a swiss-cheese history with more holes than cheese? The Lost Plays Database tries to fill in those holes. It’s an open-acces…
 
Dramaturg Kate Pitt joins us for a deep dive into the creation of the script for Hamlet's Big Adventure! (a prequel), on which she cast her dramaturgical magic (and which we'll finally get to tour once this stupid pandemic is over). Kate discusses HBA's intertextual conversation with Shakespeare’s classic tragedy, and its biofictional elements, and…
 
In this episode, we talk to some of Britain's leading stage actresses - Dame Harriet Walter, Mariah Gale, Sian Brooke, Katie West, Kellie Shirley and Stephanie McGregor - about Ophelia, one of the most iconic roles of the classical stage. We see Ophelia defy corrupt authority and express her own truths, assert her existential freedoms, in the famou…
 
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