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Best Snoozecast podcasts we could find (updated July 2020)
Best Snoozecast podcasts we could find
Updated July 2020
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Tonight, we’ll read the second part to the fairy tale called "The White Cat", credited to Madame d’Aulnoy. In part 1, the old king devises to distract his sons from taking over the throne with a sort of fool’s errand to find him the perfect beautiful lap dog. Whoever won would also take over the kingdom. The youngest son stumbles upon a magical cas…
 
Tonight, we’ll read a fairy tale called The White Cat, credited to Madame Comtesse d’Aulnoy. Madame d’Aulnoy’s tales were designed to entertain literary salon attendees for hours so they tended to be long, complicated and political. She could not openly criticize the regime of Louis the Fourteenth, or the way aristocratic women were entrapped withi…
 
Tonight, we’ll read “If On a Summer’s Night a Traveler...”, a Snoozecast original. The story is an homage to Julio Cortazar’s “The Continuity of Parks” and Italo Calvino’s “If on a winter’s night a traveler”. This meta-fiction follows a group around the campfire deciding what story to tell, while eventually settling on one that seems to converge — …
 
Tonight, we’ll read part 4 to, "The Princess and the Goblin", a children’s fantasy novel, published in 1872. One of the most successful and beloved of Victorian fairy tales, George Macdonald’s "The Princess and the Goblin" tells the story of young Princess Irene and her friend Curdie, who must outwit the threatening goblins who live in caves beneat…
 
Also known as "The Arabian Nights", "One Thousand and One Nights" is a collection of Middle Eastern folk tales compiled in Arabic during the Islamic Golden Age, which ran from the 8th to the 14th centuries. In the first part of the story, we meet the Persian emperor Kosrouschah. We also meet 3 sisters- one who becomes the emperor’s queen, and the o…
 
Tonight, we are offering the first part of the story “The Talking Bird, The Singing Tree and the Golden Water” from One Thousand and One Nights. This episode is remastered and rebroadcast - the original air date was on January 11th, 2019. Our next episode will feature part two of this story. Also known as "The Arabian Nights", "One Thousand and One…
 
Tonight, we’ll read another excerpt from “In New England Fields and Woods”, written by Rowland Evans Robinson in 1896. Robinson was, in his time, one of Vermont’s best known writers. This collection of short essays follows New England's changing seasons and moods in all its natural beauty. This particular selection covers the month of June, along w…
 
Tonight, by Patreon supporter request, we’ll read "A Lady’s Life in the Rocky Mountains", a travel book, by Isabella Bird, describing her 1873 trip to the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. The book is a compilation of letters, that Isabella Bird wrote to her sister, Henrietta. Women were scarce enough in the Western United States of the late nineteenth …
 
Tonight, we’ll read the third part to the classic 1847 novel "Jane Eyre", by English writer Charlotte Bronte. It is the story of a young, orphaned girl who lives with her Aunt and cousins and is mistreated by them. The novel is considered one of the greatest works of English fiction. — read by 'V' — pt. 1 air date: September 9, 2019 — pt. 2 air dat…
 
Tonight, we’ll read the next part to "Pride and Prejudice", written by Jane Austen. "Pride and Prejudice" follows Elizabeth Bennet, the dynamic protagonist, who learns about the repercussions of hasty judgments and eventually comes to appreciate the difference between superficial goodness and actual goodness. In the previous episode, Jane Bennet fa…
 
Tonight, we’ll read a chapter titled “An Old Road” from "A Rambler’s Lease" by Bradford Torrey, published in 1892. Torrey was an American ornithologist. He also edited a book of Thoreau’s journal writings. He wrote a preface to A Rambler’s Lease paraphrased as follows: “The writer of this little book has found so much pleasure in other men's woods …
 
Tonight, we’ll read the opening to, "The Invisible Man", a science fiction novel by H.G. Wells, published in 1897. The Invisible Man refers to a scientist named Griffin, devoted to research into optics. He invents a way to become invisible. He tests it on himself successfully, only to find that he cannot reverse it. The novel is considered influent…
 
Tonight, we’ll read The Golden Goose, from Katherine Pyle’s 1918 "Mother’s Nursery Tales". The Golden Goose was collected by The Brothers Grimm. In this tale, The Golden Goose, a simple and sweet man named John finds a goose with golden feathers- and it turns his whole world on its head. — read by 'V' — Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/sno…
 
Tonight, we’ll read an excerpt from “The Soul of Golf” by P.A. Vaile, published in 1912. Vaile was born in 1866, and wrote many books on the subject of golf. The modern game of golf originated in 15th century Scotland, but it’s ancient origins are unclear and much debated. Versions of the game may harken back to ancient Rome or China. — read by 'M'…
 
Tonight, we’ll read the seventh chapter of “Little Women” by American author Louisa May Alcott, published in 1868, titled “Amy’s Valley of Humiliation”. Following the lives of the four March sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy—the novel details their passage from childhood to womanhood and is loosely based on the author and her sisters. In the previous c…
 
Tonight, we’ll read excerpts from "Healthful Sports for Boys", by A.R. Calhoun. Also known as Alfred Rochfort, born in 1844, Calhoun was an American soldier, author, journalist and critic. He served in the Union army during the U.S. Civil War. He was born in Kentucky and died in Brooklyn in 1912. — read by 'V' — Support the show (https://www.patreo…
 
Tonight, we’ll be reading the third part to "Doctor Dolittle", written in 1920 by British author Hugh Lofting. The full title being, “The Story of Doctor Dolittle, Being the History of His Peculiar Life at Home and Astonishing Adventures in Foreign Parts”. It is the first of Lofting’s Doctor Dolittle books, a series of children's novels about a man …
 
Tonight, we’ll read the opening to "Roughing It", by Mark Twain, published in 1872. It is a semi-autobiographical travel memoir following a young Twain through the Wild West during the 1860s. US Astronauts Frank Borman and Jim Lovell read Roughing It aloud to pass the time aboard a two week long mission orbiting the earth in 1965. — read by 'V' — S…
 
Tonight, we’ll read a Japanese folk tale called "The Story of Urashima Taro, the Fisher Lad", compiled in Japanese Fairy Tales by Yei Theodora Ozaki. Urashima is a fisherman rewarded for rescuing a turtle. The tale, sometimes called the “Japanese Rip van Winkle”, originates from 8th century Japanese literature. It is considered a national fairy tal…
 
Tonight, we’ll read the second part to, "The Swiss Family Robinson". "The Swiss Family Robinson" is an 1812 novel by Johann David Wyss, about a Swiss family shipwrecked in the East Indies en route to Australia. Wyss, a Swiss pastor, originally wrote this book to entertain and instruct his four sons. In part 1, The Robinsons' ship wrecks and the fam…
 
Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the second and final part to the story, "The Princess of Babylon". This story is taken from a lesser known philosophical tale by Voltaire, written in 1768. The story focuses on Amazan, a handsome, unknown shepherd, and Formosanta, the Princess of Babylon, whose love and jealousy drive them to travel the worl…
 
Tonight, we’ll read the opening to Wassily Kandinsky’s, “Concerning the Spiritual in Art”, published in 1911. Kandinsky, a Russian painter and art theorist, is credited as the pioneer of abstract art. This text is the artist’s meditation on how the creative process feeds a spiritual hunger within the artist. — read by 'V' — Support the show (https:…
 
Tonight, we’ll read the opening to, "The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman" by Laurence Sterne and published in 1759. As its title suggests, the book is about Tristram's narration of his life story. But one of the central jokes of the novel is that he cannot explain anything simply; he must make diversions to add interest to his tale,…
 
Tonight, by Patreon supporter request, we’ll read pt. 2 to, "The Yellow Dwarf" from "The Blue Fairy Book" edited by Andrew Lang in 1889. "The Yellow Dwarf" story originated from the Countess d'Aulnoy, a 17th century French writer known for her fairy tales. In part I, Bellissima is a beautiful princess who has a spell put on her by the yellow dwarf …
 
Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the fourth installment to 1877’s, "Black Beauty" by Anna Sewall. "Black Beauty" is one of the best-selling books of all time. When we left off, we learned Ginger’s story. Ginger is a mean-spirited horse- or so she seems, until you hear her experience and mistreatment. Even the well behaved pony named Merryle…
 
Tonight, we’ll read the second part to "The Secret Garden",a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett first published in 1911. Set in England, it is now one of Burnett's most popular novels and seen as a classic of English children's literature. In the first episode, we learn of the unloved and unloving Mary. When cholera breaks out, she is left all alone …
 
Tonight, we’ll read some selected Himalayan Folk Tales from a 1906 book called "Simla Village Tales", written by Alice Elizabeth Dracott. From the author in her preface: "Himalayan folk-lore, with its beauty, wit, and mysticism, is a most fascinating study, and makes one grieve to think that the day is fast approaching when the honest rugged hill-f…
 
Tonight, we’ll read about the basics of bread making, from Volume 1 of 1925’s "Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery", written by The Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences. This institute was founded by Mary Brooks Picken in Scranton, PA. An expert on fashion, Picken also wrote the first dictionary to be published by a woman in the English…
 
Tonight, we’ll read from "Princess Belle Etoile", written by the 17th century French writer and mother of modern western fairy tales, Marie-Catherine Le Jumel de Barneville, AKA the Madame Countess d'Aulnoy. She originated the term that is now generally used for the genre. "Princess Belle Etoile" was itself inspired by an Italian fairy tale, which …
 
Tonight, we’ll read another excerpt from, “In New England Fields and Woods”, written by Rowland Evans Robinson in 1896. Robinson was, in his time, one of Vermont’s best known writers. This collection of short essays follows New England's changing seasons and moods in all its natural beauty. This particular selection covers the month of April, along…
 
Tonight, we shall read the fourth installment to Peter Pan, the 1911 novel by J.M. Barrie. In the last part, chapter 3, Peter promises Wendy to teach her to fly if she will come to Neverland and tell stories to him and “the lost boys”. Nanna the dog nanny does her best to alert the parents, but it is too late. All the children, along with Peter and…
 
Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the opening to Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, a classic American 1903 children's novel by Kate Douglas Wiggin. It tells the story of Rebecca and her aunts, one stern and one kind, in the fictional village of Riverboro,Maine. Rebecca's joy for life inspires her aunts, but she faces many trials in her young life,…
 
Tonight, we’ll read the opening stories in Tales of King Arthur and the Round Table, published in 1918 by Andrew Lang. King Arthur was a legendary British leader who, according to medieval histories and romances, led the defense of Britain against Saxon invaders in the late 5th and early 6th centuries. The details of Arthur's story are mainly compo…
 
Tonight, we'll read A Case of Identity, a short story from the Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, written by Arthur Conan Doyle in 1892. In general the stories in Sherlock Holmes identify, and try to correct, social injustices. In this story, a wealthy woman’s fiancé disappears and she hires the detective to help find him. — read by 'N' — Support the s…
 
Tonight, by listener request, we’ll finish the story of Rip Van Winkle. "Rip Van Winkle" was originally a short story by the American author Washington Irving, published in 1819. It follows a Dutch-American villager in colonial America named Rip Van Winkle who falls asleep in the Catskill Mountains and wakes up 20 years later, having missed the Ame…
 
Tonight, we’ll read "The Yellow Dwarf" from "The Blue Fairy Book", edited by Andrew Lang in 1889. "The Yellow Dwarf" story originated from the Countess d'Aulnoy, a 17th century French writer known for her fairy tales. She originated the term that is now generally used for the genre. — read by 'V' — pt. 2 air date: May 4, 2020 Support the show (http…
 
Tonight, we’ll read the sixth chapter of “Little Women” by American author Louisa May Alcott, published in 1868, titled “Beth Finds the Palace Beautiful”. Following the lives of the four March sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy—the novel details their passage from childhood to womanhood and is loosely based on the author and her sisters. In the previous…
 
Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the next section to "Queen Zixi of Ix, or The Story of the Magic Cloak", a children's book written by L. Frank Baum and published in 1905. The events of the book alternate between Noland and Ix, two neighboring regions to the Land of Oz, and Baum himself commented this was the best book he had written. In Ch…
 
Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the opening to "Riverby" by John Burroughs. The section is titled "Among the Wild Flowers". John Burroughs was an American nature essayist, active in the U.S.conservation movement. Burroughs accompanied many personalities of the time in his later years, including Theodore Roosevelt, Henry Ford (who gave him …
 
Tonight, we’ll read the opening to "Sketches of Gotham: A Collection of Unusual Stories Told in an Unusual Way", written by Owen Gould Davis in 1906. Davis was an American dramatist. In 1919, he became the first elected president of the Dramatists Guild of America. He penned hundreds of plays and scripts for radio and film. Before the First World W…
 
Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the third part to "The Princess and the Goblin", a children’s fantasy novel, published in 1872. One of the most successful and beloved of Victorian fairy tales, George Macdonald’s, "The Princess and the Goblin" tells the story of young Princess Irene and her friend Curdie, who must outwit the threatening gob…
 
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