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Best Social Sciences podcasts we could find (updated January 2020)
Best Social Sciences podcasts we could find
Updated January 2020
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A Podcast About The Science And Practice Of Living Well
 
There’s a reason the History Channel has produced hundreds of documentaries about Hitler but only a few about Dwight D. Eisenhower. Bad guys (and gals) are eternally fascinating. Behind the Bastards dives in past the Cliffs Notes of the worst humans in history and exposes the bizarre realities of their lives. Listeners will learn about the young adult novels that helped Hitler form his monstrous ideology, the founder of Blackwater’s insane quest to build his own Air Force, the bizarre lives ...
 
Undeniable power. Unbelievable stories. Unlikely origins. Kingpins follows the rise and fall of rulers of the underworld. Every Friday, we examine the leaders of organized crime rings, and how money and power corrupted and changed their communities. What makes a kingpin or queenpin, and how can we stop them? Kingpins is part of the Parcast Network, and a production of Cutler Media. New episodes release on Fridays.
 
Tyler Cowen engages today’s deepest thinkers in wide-ranging explorations of their work, the world, and everything in between. New conversations every other Wednesday. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.
 
From the desk of “Stuff You Missed in History Class,” “This Day in History Class” quickly recounts a tidbit from today’s events in history.
 
Welcome to The Psychology Podcast with Dr. Scott Barry Kaufman, where we give you insights into the mind, brain, behavior and creativity. Each episode we’ll feature a guest who will stimulate your mind, and give you a greater understanding of your self, others, and the world we live in. Hopefully, we’ll also provide a glimpse into human possibility! Thanks for listening and enjoy the podcast.
 
A podcast dedicated to the history of Persia, and the great empires that ruled there beginning with the Achaemenid Empire of Cyrus the Great and the foundation of an imperial legacy that directly impacted ancient civilizations from Rome to China, and everywhere in between. Join me as we explore the cultures, militaries, religions, successes, and failures of some of the greatest empires of the ancient world.All credits available on the website (https://historyofpersiapodcast.com/)
 
Interviews with Scholars of Psychoanalysis about their New Books
 
A podcast for the morbidly curious. From serial killers to ghosts, ancient curses to obscure medical conditions, let us satisfy your curiosity. (Some episodes may not be appropriate for children. Listener discretion is advised.)
 
Join us each month as we engage in philosophical discussions about the most common-place topics with host Jack Russell Weinstein, professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religion at the University of North Dakota. He is the director of The Institute for Philosophy in Public Life.
 
Hosts Lizzie Post and Daniel Post Senning answer audience questions about modern etiquette with advice based on consideration, respect, and honesty. Like their great-great-grandmother, Emily Post, Lizzie and Dan look for the reasons behinds the traditional rules to guide their search for the correct behavior in all kinds of contemporary situations. Test your social acumen and join the discussion about civility and decency in today's complex world.
 
Each week Inquiring Minds brings you a new, in-depth exploration of the space where science, politics, and society collide. We’re committed to the idea that making an effort to understand the world around you though science and critical thinking can benefit everyone—and lead to better decisions. We endeavor to find out what’s true, what’s left to discover, and why it all matters with weekly coverage of the latest headlines and probing discussions with leading scientists and thinkers.
 
Social Europe Podcast contributes to the public policy discussions addressing the most pressing political and economic issues of our time. We use the values of freedom, sustainability and equality as the foundation on which we examine issues in politics, economy and employment & labour. We are committed to publishing cutting-edge thinking and new ideas from the most thought-provoking people.
 
A podcast exploring the history and evolution of the political systems of the United States
 
Cara Santa Maria is a science communicator, television host, producer, and journalist. She is excited to present "Talk Nerdy," a place for conversations with interesting people about interesting topics.
 
No Jargon, the Scholars Strategy Network’s weekly podcast, presents interviews with top university scholars on the politics, policy problems, and social issues facing the nation. Powerful research, intriguing perspectives -- and no jargon. Find show notes and plain-language research briefs on hundreds of topics at www.scholarsstrategynetwork.org/nojargon.
 
The Weird History Podcast explores the out-of-the-way, obscure, weird, and overlooked corners of history. New episodes appear every Thursday.
 
Accelerated Learning for Medicine and Higher Education. Mnemonics, Memory Palaces, Speed Reading, Study Hacks, Mind Maps for the USMLE, COMLEX, Medical School, Boards, and more!
 
Join John and Ryan as they explore the field of neuropsychology through the presentation of cutting edge scientific findings, discussion of important topic areas, and interviews with experts in a variety of relevant fields. The three main objectives of the podcast are to 1) Provide interesting, relevant, and easily-accessible information for students and professionals in neuropsychology, as well as anyone who is interested in brain-behavior relationships. 2) Begin working towards unification ...
 
Listen and contribute to this community of voices who speak about our connection and partnership with the living earth.
 
The Psych Files is a podcast for anyone who wonders why we do what we do. Experienced educator Michael Britt, Ph.D., in an upbeat and friendly style, shows you how ideas from the field of psychology apply to everyday life. If you’re a life-long learner, a student or a teacher, you’ll find his 20-30 minute episodes enjoyable and educational. Over 14 million episodes have been downloaded to date with over 100,000 people listening every month. See what all the talk is about!
 
The Fallen State TV is a weekly web series hosted by Jesse Lee Peterson. The program covers topics that no other show dares to touch in pursuit of truth and enlightenment. The program features fascinating and thought-provoking guests who discuss and debate faith, culture, human nature, politics, and societal ills in an open, honest and entertaining style.
 
The History of the Cold War Podcast will cover the Cold War from the period of roughly 1945 to 1991 and the fall of the Soviet Union in bi-monthly instalments on the first and fifteenth. This Podcast will examine the Cold War from a number of different perspectives including political, diplomatic, cultural, ideological etc. This series is intended to be a grand narrative of the conflict exploring it from its early origins to its final moments and its effects on the world today. Please join u ...
 
Deep in the back of your mind, you’ve always had the feeling that there’s something strange about reality. There is. Join Robert Lamb and Joe McCormick as they examine neurological quandaries, cosmic mysteries, evolutionary marvels and our transhuman future.
 
Your weekly sandbox for social media insights, stories, experimentation, and inspiration. Every Monday (and sometimes more) we share the most cutting-edge social media marketing strategies from brands and businesses in every industry. Whether you're a social media team of one, business owner, ecommerce marketer, growth strategist, community manager, or part of an emerging global brand, you're sure to find something actionable in every single episode. Join our 30,000+ weekly listeners who are ...
 
Use the science of the mind and relationships to update your understanding of yourself and those you love – candid conversations with 2 Austin therapists and their guest experts.
 
Rationally Speaking is the bi-weekly podcast of New York City Skeptics. Join host Julia Galef and guests as they explore the borderlands between reason and nonsense, likely from unlikely, and science from pseudoscience. Any topic is fair game as long as we can bring reason to bear upon it, with both a skeptical eye and a good dose of humor!We agree with the Marquis de Condorcet, who said that in an open society we ought to devote ourselves to "the tracking down of prejudices in the hiding pl ...
 
Far-reaching conversations with a worldwide network of scientists and mathematicians, philosophers and artists developing new frameworks to explain our universe's deepest mysteries. Join host Michael Garfield at the Santa Fe Institute each week to learn about your world and the people who have dedicated their lives to exploring its emergent order: their stories, research, and insights…
 
Since 2006, the weekly Skeptoid podcast has been taking on all the most popular myths and revealing the true science, true history, and true lessons we can learn from each. Free subscribers get the most recent 50 episodes, premium subscribers (skeptoid.com) can access the full archive, all ad-free.
 
The Podcast from Australia for Science and Reason. Join Richard Saunders and his team of reporters for your weekly dose of skeptical news and interviews, reports and comments. Past guests have included, James Randi, Stephen Fry, Tim Minchin, Eugenie Scott, Dr Phil Plait, Michael Marshall, Dr Steve Novella, Dr Pamela Gay, Jon Ronson, Dr Ben Goldacre, Simon Singh, Prof. Richard Wiseman, Dick Smith, Banachek, Prof. Chris French, George Hrab, Tim Ferguson, Dr Paul Willis and many, many more. Fea ...
 
Each week we pair a comedian with a scientist, to break down the scientifically inaccurate elements of popular movies and TV shows. Warning: There will be spoilers.
 
9Honey presents The Windsors – a royal podcast. Join us as we go inside the palace walls to get to know the world’s most famous family. Hosted by Kerri Elstub with expert commentary from 9Honey’s royal columnist, Victoria Arbiter, and Australian Women’s Weekly editor-at-large and author of The Royals in Australia, Juliet Rieden.
 
Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to reveal the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, shape our choices and direct our relationships.
 
Tune in to the Always Already Podcast for indulgent conversations about critical theory (in the broadest read of the term!). Our podcast consists of two episode streams. The first is a discussion of texts spanning critical theory, political theory, social theory, and philosophy. We work through and analyze main ideas, underlying assumptions, connections with other texts and theories, and occasionally delve into the great abyss of free association, ad hoc theory jokes, and makeshift puns. The ...
 
Bite-sized interviews with top social scientists
 
Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE for Sociology. SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.
 
Interviews with Political Scientists about their New Books
 
Interviews with people who love numbers and mathematics. Hosted by Brady Haran, maker of the Numberphile series on YouTube.
 
Welcome to the Mad in America podcast, a new weekly discussion that searches for the truth about psychiatric prescription drugs and mental health care worldwide. This podcast is part of Mad in America’s mission to serve as a catalyst for rethinking psychiatric care. We believe that the current drug-based paradigm of care has failed our society and that scientific research, as well as the lived experience of those who have been diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder, calls for profound change. ...
 
We're half advice show, half survival guide. We answer all your questions, from how to find a date, to how to find water in the desert.
 
A podcast by scientists, for scientists. Methodology, scientific life, and bad language. Co-hosted by Dr. Dan Quintana (University of Oslo) and Dr. James Heathers (Northeastern University)
 
Blog and Podcast specializing in offbeat news
 
The Everyday Neuro podcast series with Dr Janine Cooper provides knowledge and inspiration to everyone and anyone interested in the fascinating fields of neuroscience, neuropsychology and the human brain. Developed to incorporate information and interviews with experts in the field, the podcasts cover a diverse range of topics from memory and cognition to trauma, brain injury and wellbeing. Janine will guide you through the current research and help you to develop greater understanding of th ...
 
Data science, big data, artificial intelligence, machine learning… they’re all the rage. In this podcast, Jessi Cisewski-Kehe and Susan Wang, 2 statisticians, give you a perspective on what’s happening in the realm of all things data. Random bantering included. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/databytes/support
 
The Social-Engineer Podcast is about humans. Understanding how we interact, communicate and relay information can help us protect, mitigate and understand social engineering attacks
 
Podcasts with Authors about their New Books
 
Linda Taylor was a con artist, a kidnapper, maybe even a murderer. She was also America’s original “welfare queen,” the villain Ronald Reagan needed to create a vision of a country being taken advantage of by its poorest citizens. Josh Levin reveals the never-before-told story of a woman whose singular life was forgotten in the rush to create a vicious American stereotype.
 
A true-crime podcast about climate change.
 
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Instagram Stories has over 500 million daily active users, meaning half of Instagram’s overall user base create or view stories every single day. This means you have the potential to connect with your Instagram audience in two different places on the app — the feed and stories — and you don’t want to waste that opportunity with dull Stories and vis…
 
This week on MIA Radio, we interview Wendy Dolin founder of the MISSD foundation. MISSD stands for Medication-Induced Suicide Prevention and Education Foundation in Memory of Stewart Dolin. In 2010, Wendy’s husband Stewart Dolin was prescribed Paxil (paroxetine), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor ("SSRI") for mild situational anxiety. Within…
 
This episode is a CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE audio experience. At various points in the podcast you can choose to turn up the volume or even plug in headphones. It's a crazy upside-down mind maze! Tune in to learn if we have free will and hear from our amazing guests Jacob Jeffries and Dr. Dan Ames (UCLA) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit mega…
 
With each new year comes a wave of good intentions as people aim to be better. They want to lose weight, exercise more, be nicer, drink less and smoke not at all. They want to change behavior, and as Susan Michie knows well, “behavior is related to absolutely everything in life.” Michie is a clinical and health psychologist who leads the Centre for…
 
Linda Burnham speaks with Joanna about: the head center as a place of spiritual liberation; our greatest wholeness; the complexity of healing; the natural energies of your hands and heart; the divine impulse in all living things; touching in a sacred manner; “your medicine chest”, medicines in your pantry; a natural remedy for concussions and bruis…
 
In this episode of Talk Nerdy, Cara is joined by Ben Orlin, teacher and author of the "Math with Bad Drawings" blog. They talk about the importance of mathematical literacy in modern society as well as ways we can improve math education. They also discuss his two new books, "Math with Bad Drawings: Illuminating the Ideas That Shape Our Reality" and…
 
On this day in 1912, Norwegian philosopher Arne Næss was born. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisersBy iHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
It is often said that with the election of Donald Trump nativism was raised from the dead. After all, here was a president who organized his campaign around a rhetoric of unvarnished racism and xenophobia. Among his first acts on taking office was to issue an executive order blocking Muslim immigrants from entering the United States. But although h…
 
Psychic Bisexuality: A British-French Dialogue (Routledge, 2018), edited by Rosine Jozef Perelberg, clarifies and develops the Freudian conception according to which sexual identity is not reduced to the anatomical difference between the sexes, but is constructed as a psychic bisexuality that is inherent to all human beings. The book takes the Freu…
 
In the mid-twentieth century, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) returned to Nauvoo, Illinois, home to the thriving religious community led by Joseph Smith before his murder in 1844. The quiet farm town became a major Mormon heritage site visited annually by tens of thousands of people. Yet Nauvoo's dramatic restoration proved fr…
 
Why and how is fiction important to women? In Why Women Read Fiction: The Stories of Our Lives (Oxford University Press, 2020), Helen Taylor, Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Exeter, explores this question to give a detailed and engaging picture of fiction in women’s lives. The book presents women’s narratives about fiction, inter…
 
It is often said that with the election of Donald Trump nativism was raised from the dead. After all, here was a president who organized his campaign around a rhetoric of unvarnished racism and xenophobia. Among his first acts on taking office was to issue an executive order blocking Muslim immigrants from entering the United States. But although h…
 
Lindsay Mayka’s new book examines the idea and implementation of participatory institutions, asking the question about when they actually work, and when they do not work, and why this is the case, especially in Latin America. Building Participatory Institutions in Latin America: Reform Coalitions and Institutional Change (Cambridge University Press…
 
Lindsay Mayka’s new book examines the idea and implementation of participatory institutions, asking the question about when they actually work, and when they do not work, and why this is the case, especially in Latin America. Building Participatory Institutions in Latin America: Reform Coalitions and Institutional Change (Cambridge University Press…
 
Psychic Bisexuality: A British-French Dialogue (Routledge, 2018), edited by Rosine Jozef Perelberg, clarifies and develops the Freudian conception according to which sexual identity is not reduced to the anatomical difference between the sexes, but is constructed as a psychic bisexuality that is inherent to all human beings. The book takes the Freu…
 
Keri Holt is the author of Reading These United States: Federal Literacy in the Early Republic, 1776-1830, published by the University of Georgia Press in 2019. Reading These United States explores how Americans read, saw, and understood the federal structure of the country in its early years. Drawing on a wide array of sources, from almanacs to te…
 
The old mantra “if it bleeds it leads” is alive and well in today’s media landscape. In fact, social media and up-to-the-second news have made it easier than ever to ingest a constant stream of information about the world. In her book, You Are What You Read: Why Changing Your Media Diet Can Change The World (Unbound, 2019), Jodie Jackson argues tha…
 
To celebrate our 100th episode, which we video-streamed live, Dan and James were joined by three special guests: Daniel Lakens, Amy Orben, and Chris Chambers. Here's what they covered in this episode: James and Dan share their favourite episodes The power of the Twitter direct message Daniel Lakens joins us to discuss his recent work on helping peo…
 
To begin our second season we look at the early years for the Quakers in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. The treatment of the Quakers by the Puritans will tell us a lot about the religious situation in Massachusetts during the era. It will also help set the stage for events that will unfold throughout this season.…
 
The Poetic Edda is one of our main sources for Norse mythology, and the poems in it feature tales of gods, heroes, giants, and (of course) Ragnarok. However, not everything in the Poetic Edda focuses on quests, battles, heroes, or monsters. Some of the major poems featuring the Aesir don’t feature the gods fighting frost giants or battling with mon…
 
On this day in 1808, William Bligh, the Governor of New South Wales, was deposed by a military coup. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisersBy iHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
On the last Sunday of every month, Parcast Rewind replays a classic episode of Kingpins that you might have missed! Frank Lucas found his way into the New York City underworld, and under the wing of a man known as the Harlem Godfather, emerged as one of the most powerful drug kingpins of all time.By Parcast Network
 
0:00:00 Introduction Richard Saunders live from Portland, Oregon 0:02:14 The Think Tank... or The Hot Tub of Truth This week the Think Tank comes to your from a Hot Tub, surrounded by snow, in the city of Bend, Oregon. Joining us in the tub to discuss if science can "save humanity" are... Dr Erika Anderson Dr Jean-Marc Roch PhD Prof. Wendi Wampler …
 
On this day in 1924, the first ever Winter Olympic Games began in Chamonix, France. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisersBy iHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
What if the Ark of the Covenant was actually a bronze-age machine capable of storing an electrostatic charge? It almost certainly wasn't, but the idea is a great excuse to explore the understanding of electricity in the ancient world. Join Robert and Joe for another Ark-themed episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind. Learn more about your ad-choices at …
 
Since our very beginnings, human beings from all civilisations across the globe have encountered the Others – intelligent, self-motivated beings that are clearly not human in their origins. Anthony Peake joins us on this episode to discuss his latest book that reveals the nature of these entities and considers how they relate to the true nature of …
 
In part 2 of this saga on extreme classification, we get into the weeds on how MACH is able to magically handle such massive classification problems. The title says it all -- hash functions are the magical ingredient. We provide a step-by-step view of how one might come up with the MACH algorithm from first principles. --- Send in a voice message: …
 
On this day in 1935, Krueger Brewing Company introduced canned beer. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisersBy iHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
Today we talk to Jeremy Black, professor of history at Exeter University, UK, about two of his most recent book projects, both of which relate to the ways in which we think about empires, and the British empire in particular. Geographies of an Imperial Power: The British World, 1688-1815 (Indiana University Press, 2018) and Imperial legacies: The B…
 
Professor Adrienne Petty discusses her book, Standing Their Ground: Small Farmers in North Carolina Since the Civil War (Oxford University Press, 2013), the black and white farmers in the South who were part of the "small farming class," and their evolving strategies for holding onto their land through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The tr…
 
Neil Maher talks about the social forces that shaped NASA in the 1960s and 70s, connecting the space race with the radical upheavals of the counterculture. Maher is a professor of history at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University, Newark. He is the author of Apollo in the Age of Aquarius (Harvard University Press, 2017). The …
 
For years, drug overdose was unmentionable in polite society. OD was understood to be something that took place in dark alleys―an ugly death awaiting social deviants―neither scientifically nor clinically interesting. But over the last several years, overdose prevention has become the unlikely object of a social movement, powered by the miracle drug…
 
What can a cultural history of the heartthrob teach us about women, desire, and social change? From dreams of Prince Charming or dashing military heroes, to the lure of dark strangers and vampire lovers; from rock stars and rebels to soulmates, dependable family types or simply good companions, female fantasies about men tell us as much about the h…
 
The relationship between Islam and the environment has a long and rich history across various Muslim societies. Anna M. Gade, Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, outlines several strains where these domains intersect in her book Muslim Environmentalisms: Religious and Social Foundations (Columbia University Press, 2019). Gade takes th…
 
The neoliberal consensus, once thought to be undefeatable, seems to have been broken both in the wake of the fiscal crisis of 2008, as well as a series of surprise movements and elections throughout the world in the last several years. But many scholars argue that it remains alive and well, just in a changed, mutated form. This is the theme that mo…
 
The neoliberal consensus, once thought to be undefeatable, seems to have been broken both in the wake of the fiscal crisis of 2008, as well as a series of surprise movements and elections throughout the world in the last several years. But many scholars argue that it remains alive and well, just in a changed, mutated form. This is the theme that mo…
 
As the other Harlem policy bankers fall at the hands of Dutch Schultz, Stephanie St. Clair stood firm. Unfortunately for St. Clair, Schultz had political muscles and members of the NYPD on his payroll.By Parcast Network
 
Lalibela, Ethiopia is home to one of the true wonders of the world: a series of 11 rock-hewn monolithic churches -- all interconnected by tunnels and passages that connect to catacombs and hermit caves. In this episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind, Robert and Joe explore the details of these 12th century marvels. Learn more about your ad-choices at h…
 
“Yes means yes is the new no means no!” Often we doubt our gut instinct, question our right to take up space in the world, and live governed by fear -especially when we’ve experienced trauma. Meet the Safety Team, a group of ordinary women doing extraordinary work teaching women how to build resiliency and re-claim their sense of agency. In this ep…
 
We are living in the midst of an epidemic. Over the past 15 years, the number of Americans dying from opioid-related overdoses has skyrocketed by more than 200%. Facing a mounting death toll, policymakers have proposed solutions from needle exchanges to reducing the availability of prescription opioids. But the crisis seems to rage on. Professor Ke…
 
Robert is joined again by Shereen Lani Younes to continue discussing the creator of Fascism, Gabriele D’Annunzio. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisersBy iHeartRadio
 
On this day in 1556, the deadliest earthquake in recorded history hit Shaanxi province in China. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisersBy iHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
Every day, new warnings emerge about artificial intelligence rebelling against us. All the while, a more immediate dilemma flies under the radar. Have forces been unleashed that are thrusting humanity down an ill-advised path, one that's increasingly making us behave like simple machines? In Re-Engineering Humanity (Cambridge University Press, 2018…
 
Franklin Delano Roosevelt, when asked at a press conference about the roots of his political philosophy, responded simply, “I am a Christian and a Democrat.” This new book is the story of how the first informed the second—how his upbringing in the Episcopal Church and matriculation at the Groton School under legendary educator and minister Endicott…
 
Emily Colbert Cairns’ book, Esther in Early Modern Iberia and the Sephardic Diaspora: Queen of the Conversas (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017), traces the biblical figure of Esther, the secret Jewish Queen, as she is reinvented as the patron saint for the early modern Sephardic community. This hybrid globetrotter emerges repeatedly in dramatic texts, poet…
 
Holocaust research tends to concentrate on certain geographic regions. We know much about the Holocaust in Poland, Germany and Western Europe. We are learning more and more about the 'Holocaust by Bullets' in the territories of the Soviet Union. This is obviously a good thing. But that emphasis leaves us knowing much less about other regions in Eur…
 
Today I’m speaking with author Christina Adams, and Adams has something of a surprising muse: camels. That’s right, camels. One hump, two humps, crossing the Egyptian desert or the Siberian tundra. Adams’ muse is surprising, because she lives, like many of us, in North America—Orange County, California, to be exact. That’s not the place where you’d…
 
If you’re a parent you’ve likely had your buttons pushed by your toddler in the throes of a tantrum. We know we have! It’s downright difficult to handle your toddler’s distress and maintain your cool when they’re howling about you doing it “all wrong” … for the sixth time today. In this episode Yael speaks with Dr. Schrag Hershberg, a clinical psyc…
 
Since the first Industrial Revolution, most people have responded in one of two ways to the threat of technological unemployment: either a general blanket fear that the machines are coming for us all, or an equally uncritical dismissal of the issue. But history shows otherwise: the labor market changes over time in adaptation to the complex and non…
 
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