show episodes
 
Health Care Rounds is a weekly podcast developed for health care leaders who are at the forefront of health care delivery and payment reform. Join Darwin Research Group founder and CEO John Marchica as he discusses the latest advancements in health care business news and policy developments, including interviews with dynamic leaders in health care. John is a veteran health care strategist and is leading ongoing research initiatives on health care delivery systems and value-based care. Health ...
 
EdTech Café is a podcast series produced by the educational technology team at Stanford Medicine. Our team sits at the intersection of art, science, and education, and in this space we’ll sit down with other media- and production-savvy professionals to discuss how they use their talents to support science and education across the globe.
 
Teachers in White Coats is a podcast series produced by the Educational Technology team at Stanford Medicine, where we sit down with doctors, faculty, and other health professionals to hear their stories on the innovative ways they’ve used education to help improve health outcomes across the globe. The show is hosted by Erfan Mojaddam, Manager of Academic Tech and Innovation at Stanford Medicine.
 
BioFlash is a biweekly podcast, hosted by San Francisco Business Times biotech reporter Ron Leuty. From cancer immunotherapy to drug pricing, we explore the hot topics driving the life sciences ecosystem in the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond.
 
Reach Your Height, gives limb reconstruction specialists as well as their patients access to thought leaders as they discuss best practices for patients undergoing limb lengthening and or reconstruction. Host Dr. Mitchell Bernstein, head of Pediatric Orthopedic Trauma at Montreal Childrens Hospital and co-director of the limb deformity unit at Shriner’s Hospital for Children in Montreal interviews highly regarded surgeons around the world. We’ll also hear from some of their patients. We hope ...
 
Being healthy in this crazy, busy, modern world is not easy. The Whole Health Life Podcast is for anyone who wants to take control of their health and find real-world, simple, evidence-based solutions to improve their health from every aspect, adding years to their lives and saving thousands of dollars. Each episode, Shannon Harvey, talks to a world leading scientist about the most important aspects of our health. From dealing with work stress, the food we eat, to improving our relationships ...
 
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show series
 
What if our response to COVID-19 was minimally effective but inflicted a TON of harm? Why do those who dare to ask this question run afoul of the academic establishment?Dr. Eran Bendavid is associate professor of medicine at Stanford and an infectious disease specialist and health outcomes/health policy researcher. He is co-author of the Santa Clar…
 
When we empathize with a story, we can lose sight of the bigger picture.Video: https://zdoggmd.com/covid-irrationalYour support makes what we do possible! Join the SuperPac and get exclusive content, live discussions, and other crazy perks:YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/zdoggmd/joinFacebook: http://facebook.com/becomesupporter/zdoggmdPatreon…
 
The Beatles’ sojourn in the St. Pauli district of Hamburg during the early 1960s is part of music legend. As Julia Sneeringer reveals in A Social History of Early Rock ‘n’ Roll in Germany: Hamburg from Burlesque to The Beatles, 1956-69 (Bloomsbury, 2018), though, this was just the most famous episode in the neighborhood’s momentous engagement with …
 
It is 1969 and Jody A. Forrester is in her late teens, transitioning from a Sixties love child to pacifist anti-Vietnam War activist to an ardent revolutionary. Guns Under the Bed: Memories of a Young Revolutionary (Odyssey Books) revolves around her three years in the Revolutionary Union, a Communist organization advocating armed overthrow of the …
 
Everyday suffering—those conditions or feelings brought on by trying circumstances that arise in everyone’s lives—is something that humans have grappled with for millennia. But the last decades have seen a drastic change in the way we approach it. In the past, a person going through a time of difficulty might keep a journal or see a therapist, but …
 
In Merchants of Medicine: The Commerce and Coercion of Health in Britain’s Long Eighteenth Century (The University of Chicago Press), medicines embody the hopes of those who prepared, sold, and ingested them. By investigating the different contexts and practices associated with the British long-distance trade in patent medicines, Zachary Dorner unr…
 
Stewart Gandolf, MBA Stewart Gandolf, is Chief Executive Officer of Healthcare Success, one of the nation’s leading healthcare and digital marketing agencies. Over the past 20 years, Stewart has marketed and consulted for over 1,000 healthcare clients, ranging from practices and hospitals to multi-billion dollar corporations. A frequent speaker, St…
 
Omar H. Ali’s Malik Ambar: Power and Slavery across the Indian Ocean (Oxford University Press, 2016), provides insight into the life of slave soldier Malik Ambar. It offers a rare look at an individual who began in obscurity in the Horn of Africa and reached the highest levels of South Asian political and military affairs in the late sixteenth and …
 
The relationship between the United States and Saudi Arabia is a critical feature of the modern international system. It binds the global hegemon to a region on the other side of the planet. And it has facilitated capitalist-led globalization. However, as both the US and and Saudi governments have tried to hide the relationship from their respectiv…
 
The Fabric of Indigeneity: Ainu Identity, Gender, and Settler Colonialism in Japan (University of New Mexico Press) is a recent addition to the growing scholarship on Ainu identity and settler colonialism in Japan. Combining ethnographic fieldwork in contemporary Ainu communities and organizations with museum and archival research, Dr. Lewallen sho…
 
In the thoroughly researched, lucidly narrated new book Shareholder Cities: Land Transformations Along Urban Corridors in India (University of Pennsylvania Press), Sai Balakrishnan (Assistant Professor of City and Urban Planning at UC Berkeley) examines the novel phenomenon of the conversion of agrarian landowners into urban shareholders in India’s…
 
Today we are joined by Jorge Iber, Professor of History and Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Science at Texas Tech, and Mario Longoria, a long-time author and educator who received his PhD in English in 2014. The two are the authors of Latinos in American Football: Pathbreakers on the Gridiron, 1927 to the Present (McFarland and Co Publish…
 
Selling Antislavery: Abolition and Mass Media in Antebellum America (University of Pennsylvania Press) is a richly illustrated history of the American Anti-Slavery Society and its print, material, and visual artifacts. Beginning with its establishment in the early 1830s, the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS) recognized the need to reach and cons…
 
In Managing Multiculturalism: Indigeneity and the Struggle for Rights in Colombia (Stanford University Press) Jean Jackson narrates her remarkable journey as an anthropologist in Colombia for over 50 years. This is an extraordinary book because it shows us Jackson’s trajectory, the challenges she faced, the changes she underwent as a researcher and…
 
Washington University School of Medicine’s unique approach to admissions [Show summary] Dr. Valerie Ratts, Associate Dean for Admissions at Washington University School of Medicine, explores what’s unique about the medical school’s approach to admissions, including what COVID-related changes applicants can expect this year. Interview with Dr. Valer…
 
The opening years of the twentieth century saw a grand cast of radicals and reformers fighting for a new America, seeking change not only in labor picket lines and at women’s suffrage rallies but also in homes and bedrooms. In the thick of this heady milieu were Sara Bard Field and Charles Erskine Scott Wood, two aspiring poets and political activi…
 
When weekly newsreels launched in the early twentieth century, they offered the U.S. public the first weekly record of events that symbolized “indisputable evidence” of the news. In News Parade: The American Newsreel and the World as Spectacle (University of Minnesota Press), Joseph Clark examines the history of the newsreel and how it changed the …
 
On a cold March day in 1893, 26-year-old nurse Lillian Wald rushed through the poverty-stricken streets of New York’s Lower East Side to a squalid bedroom where a young mother lay dying—abandoned by her doctor because she could not pay his fee. The misery in the room and the walk to reach it inspired Wald to establish Henry Street Settlement, which…
 
By the dawn of the twentieth century, Budapest was a burgeoning cosmopolitan metropolis. Known at the time as the “Pearl of the Danube,” it boasted some of Europe’s most innovative architectural and cultural achievements, and its growing middle class was committed to advancing the city’s liberal politics and making it an intellectual and commercial…
 
Dr. Jay Bhattacharya is a Stanford physician and economist and co-author of several seroprevalence studies on COVID-19. In this must-hear interview we talk about EVERYTHING. Including the true infection fatality rate, comparisons to influenza, drama around his Santa Clara antibody trial, reinfections, vaccine development, economic and social impact…
 
Irene Davis is the founding Director of the Spaulding National Running Center at the Harvard Medical School. In this episode, Irene describes how her research of biomechanics and clinical work with running injuries, as well as research by others, has shaped her views on maintaining body alignment and foot health. Irene discusses her argument for th…
 
In Subversive Seas: Anticolonial Networks across the Twentieth-Century Dutch Empire (Cambridge UP, 2019), Kris Alexanderson offers a revealing portrait of the Dutch Empire repositions our understanding of modern empires from the terrestrial to the oceanic. It highlights the importance of shipping, port cities, and maritime culture to the political …
 
As suburbanization, racial conflict, and the consequences of urban renewal threatened New York City with “urban crisis,” the administration of Mayor John V. Lindsay (1966–1973) experimented with a broad array of projects in open spaces to affirm the value of city life. Mariana Mogilevich provides a fascinating history of a watershed moment when des…
 
Jonathan Lee’s comprehensive study of Afghanistan’s political history in Afghanistan: A History from 1260 to the Present (Reaktion Books) tells the story of the emergence and sometimes surprising longevity of the Afghan state in the face of serious external and internal challenges over the last three centuries. Readers will find a compelling narrat…
 
Thomas R. Metcalf’s Imperial Connections: India in the Indian Ocean Arena, 1860-1920 (University of California Press) is an innovative remapping of empire. Imperial Connections offers a broad-ranging view of the workings of the British Empire in the period when the India of the Raj stood at the center of a newly globalized system of trade, investme…
 
What if masks acted to reduce severity of COVID-19 infection for the WEARER, fostering immunity like a vaccine and allowing a full societal reopening? UCSF medicine professor Dr. Monica Gandhi recently proposed just such a theory in the New England Journal of Medicine.Links to papers, transcript (coming soon), and more at https://zdoggmd.com/monica…
 
Zak Holdsworth creates technology—and community—that just might drive healthcare's next revolution: Direct Primary Care.Register for the Hint Summit (and automatically get $50 off using this link or the code "ZPAC50": https://go.hint.com/3jddPInTranscript, video, links, and more on Direct Primary Care at: https://zdoggmd.com/hintYour support makes …
 
Despite her nearly two decades as the publisher of the largest newspaper in a politically pivotal state, the role of Nackey Scripps Loeb in American political and media history has been unjustly forgotten. In Political Godmother: Nackey Scripps Loeb and the Newspaper That Shook the Republican Party (Potomac Books, 2020), Meg Heckman describes the w…
 
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