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Best Tuberculosis podcasts we could find (updated July 2020)
Best Tuberculosis podcasts we could find
Updated July 2020
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Take as Directed is the podcast series of the CSIS Global Health Policy Center. It highlights important news, events, issues, and perspectives in global health policy, particularly in infectious disease, health security, and maternal, newborn, and child health. The podcast brings you commentary and perspectives from some of the leading voices in global health and CSIS Global Health Policy Center in-house experts
 
This is F1 And Done. We will be doing our best to provide an American barstool style of biting, fanboy commentary on Formula 1. We’ll be recording podcasts after every Grand Prix. Our goal is to share a few laughs, offer opinions, and enjoy the unique sport of Formula 1 racing.
 
What do I say about myself? I try to find out who am I. Isn't that the question that bothers all of us. After all who are we? Why do we do certain things the way we do them? There are far too many questions that are left answered in this constantly evolving and ever-changing world of ours. Why do we look at everything through the prism of an ism? Why do we love to label everyone? Why can't we handle the diversity of thought? Why are we constantly engaged in the process of homogenising opinio ...
 
Understanding India and its place in the world in different ways. Tune into ThoughtSpace, the Centre for Policy Research’s podcast, and delve deeper into the important issues of our time: accountability, sanitation, urbanisation, land rights, climate change, technology and society, environmental law, state capacity, infrastructure, social conflict, great power politics, identity politics, election studies, and more.
 
Come talk a walk on the weird side of history with three history-loving idiots. Every other wednesday, we dive into tales of strange, obscure, or just plain interesting history, making millions of dumb jokes along the way. Join us as we laugh and learn together!
 
MedStud Memoirs is a podcast designed for premed, medical school, and other healthcare students. We take the textbook knowledge involved in medicine outside of the classroom by sharing experiences of patients, doctors, and more. MedStud Memoirs is produced by two medical school students: Brian Elliott and Jarett Beaudoin. Music "Beyond Home" adapted from tracks by Brandon Liew on FreeMusicArchive, URL: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Brandon_Liew/
 
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In this episode Dr Sharee Basdeo chats to me about her research into the emerging field of innate immune training and the cross-talk between immune cells in the context of infectious diseases such as TB. She also talks to me about the 'creative freedom' she has in the lab, how shes a 'life-long learner' and how 'no nature paper is going to come clo…
 
Elisheva A. Perelman's new book American Evangelists and Tuberculosis in Modern Japan (Hong Kong University Press, 2020) examines the consequences of Japan’s decision not to tackle the tuberculosis epidemic that ravaged the country during the last quarter of the nineteenth century and the first quarter of the twentieth. TB was a plague of epic prop…
 
The question of how a state decides what its official language is going to be, or indeed whether it even needs one, is never simple, and this may be particularly true of China which covers a continental landmass encompassing multitude of different language families and groups. Indeed, what is even meant by “Chinese” is unclear when one considers th…
 
In this episode, Steve and Andrew invite Frances Stead Sellers, senior writer on the American desk at the Washington Post. Frances, through her eyes as an English immigrant to America -- and a renowned, veteran journalist -- has thought hard about what makes America what it is, in these days of a pandemic, economic pain and racial injustice. Her re…
 
In this conversation, Monika Halan talks about the Six money rules she learned from the pandemic. We talk about topics such as the cost of living, emergency funds, the volatility of the stock markets, and much more.You can read Monika's work here https://www.livemint.com/Search/Link/Author/Monika-HalanYou can buy her book here https://www.amazon.in…
 
In this conversation, Monika Halan talks about the Six money rules she learnt from the pandemic. We talk about topics such as the cost of living, emergency funds, the volatility of the stock markets, and much more.You can read Monika's work here https://www.livemint.com/Search/Link/Author/Monika-HalanYou can buy her book here https://www.amazon.in/…
 
Robert Alpert (Fordham and Hunter College) discusses pandemics in film as a form of popular culture. After an introduction of how to analyze film and whose perspective it conveys, the conversation focuses on two films, Outbreak (1995) and Contagion (2011), and the shifting ways in which each represented its fictional pandemic. Alpert points out the…
 
He Bian’s new book Know Your Remedies: Pharmacy and Culture in Early Modern China (Princeton University Press, 2020) is a beautiful cultural history of pharmacy in early modern China. This trans-dynastic book looks at how Chinese approaches to knowledge changed during the Ming and Qing as state-commissioned pharmacopeias dwindled, amateur investiga…
 
He Bian’s new book Know Your Remedies: Pharmacy and Culture in Early Modern China (Princeton University Press, 2020) is a beautiful cultural history of pharmacy in early modern China. This trans-dynastic book looks at how Chinese approaches to knowledge changed during the Ming and Qing as state-commissioned pharmacopeias dwindled, amateur investiga…
 
In this episode, Steve and Andrew speak with Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) on the most pressing health issues before America. What is driving the astonishing resurgence of Covid-19 in the south and west, and what is now required? Why are we as a nation still hung up politically over masks and failing to reach the true level of testing we need? What s…
 
Bringing attention to the importance of li (an articulated system of social domination and political legitimization, consisting of rituals, ceremonies, and rites) as the foundation of the Qing political system, Macabe Keliher’s book The Board of Rites and the Making of Qing China (University of California Press, 2019) challenges traditional underst…
 
We stand on the eve of a different kind of world, but comprehending it is difficult: we are so accustomed to dealing with the paradigms of the contemporary world that we inevitably take them for granted, believing that they are set in concrete rather than themselves being the subject of longer-run cycles of historical change. – Martin Jacques, When…
 
In this episode, the hosts are joined by Julie Gerberding, a senior executive at Merck, a longstanding friend, and generous contributor to CSIS’s work. Congress was highly active the week of June 22 examining across several committees the hard lessons of the past months of the coronavirus pandemic in America and what needs to happen right now -- as…
 
Seth Archer from Utah State sits down with Merle and Lee to talk about the diseases that passed through the Columbian Exchange and their impact on Native Americans. Archer offers a broad take on how historians have written about diseases after the colonization of North America and then turns to his area of expertise: the impact of disease on Hawaii…
 
Today I talked to Charlotte Bruckermann about her new book Claiming Homes: Confronting Domicide in Rural China (Berghahn Books, 2019). Chinese citizens make themselves at home despite economic transformation, political rupture, and domestic dislocation in the contemporary countryside. By mobilizing labor and kinship to make claims over homes, peopl…
 
Dr Ciaran Fairman chats to me about his career, from his dreams of being a professional soccer player in Finglas to his current research into the benefit of exercise in cancer management. He also talks about moving to rural Kentucky at 18 and how finding exercise science changed his life. Follow Ciaran: twitter.com/CiaranFairman Follow me: twitter.…
 
Natalie Kimball is the author of An Open Secret: The History of Unwanted Pregnancy and Abortion in Modern Bolivia, out this year from Rutgers University Press. An Open Secret argues that, despite stigma and continued legal prohibitions, practices and attitudes surrounding abortion have changed in urban Bolivia since the 1950s. Kimball shows how wom…
 
Today we are joined by John Harney, Associate Professor of History and Chair of the Asian Studies Department at Centre College, and author of Empire of Infields: Baseball in Taiwan and Cultural Identity, 1895-1968 (University of Nebraska Press, 2019). In our conversation, we discussed the origins of baseball in Taiwan, the role of baseball in the J…
 
In this forty-fifth episode of ThoughtSpace, Yamini Aiyar, President & Chief Executive of CPR, speaks with Dr Mekhala Krishnamurthy, Senior Fellow and Director of the new State Capacity Initiative at CPR and Associate Professor at Ashoka University. In the last few weeks, the government of India has made significant announcements on reforming agric…
 
New mothers face a barrage of confounding decisions during the life-cycle of early motherhood which includes... Should they change their diet or mindset to conceive? Exercise while pregnant? Should they opt for a home birth or head for a hospital? Whatever they “choose,” they will be sure to find plenty of medical expertise from health practitioner…
 
Ida Milne from Carlow College joins Merle and Lee in a conversation on the 1918 influenza pandemic. Milne’s work has been instrumental in uncovering the story of the pandemic in Ireland, and she reflects on her work so far. Among the topics covered are the vexed question of origins of the 1918 pandemic, as well as the the context of Irish history t…
 
Many people outside China, and indeed many urbanites living in the country, rarely think about its vast rural areas. Yet today’s People’s Republic in many ways owes existence to the countryside where, seven and more decades ago, a rural revolution brought the new state into people’s lives, and new people under the state’s stewardship. Brian DeMare’…
 
In this episode, the hosts engage with Sheryl Gay Stolberg, renowned Washington Correspondent at The New York Times. Since early this year she has been charged with unpacking -- in the midst of the pandemic -- the complex intersection of health, policy, politics and culture. She’s dived into the controversy around hydroxychloroquine, a saga that st…
 
I chat with Dr. Nayanika Barat about the effects of the COVID19 pandemic on mental health. We discuss how the lockdown tends to have an adverse effect on our mental health and what are the coping mechanisms for the same.You can follow Nayanika on Twitter @nayanikaaaYou can follow me on Twitter @kushal_mehraYou can support the Carvaka Podcast on Pat…
 
In this episode I chat to Dr Andy Hogan about the obesity epidemic in Ireland and how this impacts inflammation and immune function. He discusses the strategies his lab are investigating to combat this. Andy also tells me how he 'doesn't see research as work' and chats about his previous kickboxing career. Follow Andy: twitter.com/OSheaHoganLab Fol…
 
Xu Xu (1908-1980) was one of the most widely read Chinese authors of the 1930s to 1960s. His popular urban gothic tales, his exotic spy fiction, and his quasi-existentialist love stories full of nostalgia and melancholy offer today’s readers an unusual glimpse into China’s turbulent twentieth century. The translations in Bird Talk and Other Stories…
 
Guy Geltner and Janna Coomans from the University of Amsterdam and members of the project Premodern Healthscaping, discuss their work that offers new insights into what public health was like in medieval urban settings. They reveal a far more complex picture of how local cities practiced various types of public health. Geltner and Coomans talk abou…
 
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