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Detours

101
Detours

WGBH Educational Foundation

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What happens to all that stuff on America’s favorite antiques show once the cameras leave town? DETOURS reveals the stories, secrets, and surprises of TV treasures which go beyond the screen. Join host Adam Monahan, a longtime producer with GBH’s Antiques Roadshow on a journey of discovery from behind the scenes of the hit PBS series. Each episode tells the deeper story of one object, amazing and amusing listeners along the way. From GBH and PRX.
 
An award-winning, original, investigative series made by the team behind the acclaimed PBS documentary show, FRONTLINE. From the long and deadly arm of 9/11, to a police shooting in West Virginia with a startling twist, to what life is really like for children living in a Kenyan refugee camp, each episode follows a different reporter through an investigation that sometimes is years in the making. The FRONTLINE Dispatch – because some stories are meant to be heard. Produced at FRONTLINE’s hea ...
 
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The Scrum

1
The Scrum

WGBH Educational Foundation

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The Scrum is a weekly politics podcast from WGBH News, Boston's PBS and NPR affiliate (89.7 FM), hosted by Adam Reilly and Peter Kadzis. The Scrum focuses on Boston and Massachusetts politics, but makes frequent forays into the national scene — especially when local individuals and issues of note make their influence felt. Talk back to us on Twitter (@reillyadam, @kadzis) or via email: scrum@wgbh.org.
 
Under the Radar with Callie Crossley looks to alternative presses and community news for stories that are often overlooked by big media outlets. In our roundtable conversation, we aim to examine the small stories before they become the big headlines with contributors in Boston and New England. For more information, visit our website: wgbhnews.org/utr
 
From the PBS science series NOVA, a biweekly podcast digging into the science behind the headlines. Alok Patel takes you behind the scenes with the people—scientists, engineers, technologists, mathematicians and more—working to understand our world. Now it's more critical than ever to distinguish fact from fiction and find science-based answers to the most pressing questions of our time. Subscribe, and learn more by visiting pbs.org/novanowpodcast.
 
Every Friday, Amy Walter brings you the trends in politics long before the national media picks up on them. Known as one of the smartest and most trusted journalists in Washington, D.C., Amy Walter is respected by politicians and pundits on all sides of the aisle. You may know Amy her from her work with Cook Political Report and the PBS NewsHour where she looks beyond the breaking news headlines for a deeper understanding of how Washington works, who's pulling the levers of power, and how it ...
 
On Sept. 13, 2018, at 4:04 p.m., an alarm sounded at a natural gas monitoring center in Columbus, Ohio. High-pressured natural gas had just been released into a low-pressure gas line in Massachusetts’ Merrimack Valley. Soon, buildings in Lawrence, Andover and North Andover would explode and catch fire. Thousands of people would be ordered to flee their homes and seek safety on the streets. WGBH Reporters were there to collect their stories and get answers to the questions on everyone’s mind: ...
 
MASTERPIECE Studio is your backstage pass to the PBS series—from Sherlock to Poldark. After the show, turn off the TV and tune in to MASTERPIECE Studio for the scoop with host Jace Lacob. Listen for exclusive interviews with the cast and crew of your favorite shows. Get the history lowdown behind the people and places you see on screen, and hear revealing stories from the set. MASTERPIECE Studio is made possible by Viking Cruises and Raymond James. Sponsors for MASTERPIECE on PBS are Viking ...
 
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NOVA | PBS

1
NOVA | PBS

WGBH Science Unit

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NOVA brings you short audio stories from the world of science -- anything from hurricanes to mummies to neutrinos. For more science programming online and on air, visit NOVA's Web site at pbs.org/nova, or watch NOVA broadcasts Wednesday nights on PBS.
 
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One Guest

1
One Guest

WGBH Educational Foundation

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What's your story? WGBH's first-ever live action online series, "One Guest," asks that question and finds answers that are sometimes offbeat, always interesting, and definitely leave you wanting more. Hosted by WGBH talent from various departments within the foundation, "One Guest" is a series of short-form webisodes that feature one-on-one interviews with people throughout New England. And they all have a story to tell.
 
NOVA brings you short video stories from the world of science, including excerpts from our television programs, video dispatches from producers and correspondents in the field, animations, and much more. For more science programming online and on air, visit NOVA's Web site at http://www.pbs.org/nova and watch NOVA broadcasts Wednesday nights on PBS. Please note that this feed requires QuickTime 7. Free upgrade available at apple.com/itunes.
 
Produced live at WGBH Studios in Boston, Basic Black *is the longest-running program on public television focusing on the interests of people of color. The show, which was originally called *Say Brother, was created in 1968 during the height of the civil rights movement as a response to the demand for public television programs reflecting the concerns of communities of color. Each episode features a panel discussion across geographic borders and generational lines with the most current stori ...
 
Hosted by international garden design sensation Jamie Durie and featuring Chef Michel Nischan's James Beard award-winning "Homegrown" cooking segments, The Victory Garden equips viewers with the confidence and inspiration to roll up their sleeves, get their hands dirty, and live outdoors.With so many Americans aspiring to care for the environment and create their own outdoor living spaces, The Victory Garden's unique fusion of garden design, earth-to-table cooking, and eco-conscious how-to t ...
 
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Bird News

1
Bird News

WCAI, The Cape and Islands NPR Station

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Bird news airs on Wednesdays at 8:35am, Thursday at 12:35pm and Fridays at 4:30pm.E. Vernon Laux is an author and ornithologist who's been birding the Cape and Islands for nearly 40 years. He's the resident naturalist and land manager for the Linda Loring Foundation on Nantucket.
 
The Truth About Cancer video podcast is an eight-part video series. It is a continuation of the discussions begun in TAKE ONE STEP: A Conversation About Cancer with Linda Ellerbee. Each episode is two to five minutes long. Participating in the podcast discussions are U.S. News and World Report health editor Dr. Bernadine Healy; breast cancer surgeon and Breast Cancer Research stamp mastermind Dr. Ernie Bodai; neurologist and leading palliative care expert Dr. Richard Payne; and counseling ps ...
 
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Blacklisted

1
Blacklisted

Produced and directed by Tony Kahn

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In October 1947, the House Un-American Activities Committee opened its hearing into Communist influence in the movie business and promptly denounced 19 prominent directors, producers, screenwriters, and actors as enemies of the state. One of them was Hollywood screenwriter Gordon Kahn, whose films include All Quiet on the Western Front and The African Queen. In this six-part personal history of the Hollywood Blacklist, Gordon Kahn's son, Morning Stories producer Tony Kahn, tells the story of ...
 
Join Pinkalicious and her little brother Peter as they sing along to their favorite songs from the hit PBS Kids show, Pinkalicious and Peterrific. Each episode you’ll go on a pinkcredible adventures – dancing, singing and making believe with the pinka-tastic sister and brother podcast hosts, Pinkalicious and Peter. Based on the bestselling picture book Pinkalicious by Victoria Kann and Elizabeth Kann. The Pinkalicious and Peterrific podcast is made by the folks behind some of your all-time f ...
 
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The Takeaway: Story of the Day

1
The Takeaway: Story of the Day

Public Radio International and WNYC Radio

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Daily highlights from The Takeaway, the national morning news program that delivers the news and analysis you need to catch up, start your day, and prepare for what's ahead. The Takeaway, along with the BBC World Service, The New York Times and WGBH Boston, invites listeners every morning to learn more and be part of the American conversation on-air and online at thetakeaway.org.
 
Beware, these scary stories will transform you! The Creeping Hour is a horror anthology series hosted by the Creeps, three friends who listened to so many scary stories that they turned into monsters themselves. Gather your whole family to shiver with fright as you listen to the terrifying tales of The Creeping Hour. Listen if you dare. Don’t say we didn’t warn you! The Creeping Hour is a co-production of WGBH and Elie Lichtschein. It is appropriate for all ages and recommended for kids ages ...
 
NEXT was a radio show and podcast that aired its final episode in May 2021 after a successful five-year run. The weekly program focused on New England, one of America's oldest places, at a time of change. NEXT was produced at Connecticut Public Radio and featured stories from journalists across the New England News Collaborative. Most recently, the program was hosted by Morgan Springer. With New England as our laboratory, NEXT asked questions about how we power our society, how we move aroun ...
 
From the Top at Carnegie Hall, hosted by celebrated pianist Christopher O'Riley, showcases the top-notch skills, offbeat humor and compelling stories of America's best young classical musicians. This video podcast offers interviews, at-home videos, Carnegie performances, out-takes and raw, unedited rehearsals.
 
Watch full episodes of PBS' From the Top at Carnegie Hall, showcasing America’s most extraordinary young musicians aged 8 to 18. Based on the popular NPR program and hosted by acclaimed pianist Christopher O’Riley, the television series takes viewers behind the scenes with today’s rising young musicians, and captures the excitement of their Carnegie Hall debuts.
 
Find out what really goes on behind the scenes on "Fetch! with Ruff Ruffman" in exclusive interviews with the top dog himself, Ruff Ruffman. FETCH! with Ruff Ruffman is the hilarious reality TV series for 6 to 10 year old kids that features real kids, real challenges and one really cool canine host.
 
This eleven-part podcast series, a companion to PBS' Valentine's Day television special, The Hidden Epidemic: Heart Disease In America, features best-selling author, Dr. Michael F. Roizen, M.D. and Larry King of CNN's Larry King Live and the Larry King Cardiac Foundation, along with Julie Bain, Health Director at Reader's Digest magazine. In conversation with Julie Bain, Dr. Roizen explains ten different, easy steps you can take to a healthier heart. In the eleventh podcast, Larry King tells ...
 
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show series
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners about how they are reacting to the latest news about the Omicron variant. Michelle Singletary gives tips on how to budget for the holiday and avoid scams during the shopping season. Singletary is a nationally syndicated columnist for The Washington Post, whose award-winning column …
 
This week on Under the Radar: Harvard professor Dr. Marcella Alsan is a physician-economist and a member of the 2021 MacArthur “Genius Fellows” — one of three who are local. We talk with Dr. Alsan for our series, “The Genius Next Door.” She researches the effects of racial discrimination and the resulting mistrust of the medical field for historica…
 
This week on Under the Radar: George Wein, jazz promoter, musician and producer, died in September at the age of 95. The music impresario with local roots is best known for founding the annual summer Newport Jazz Festival. Born and raised in Massachusetts, Wein played piano and jazz as a child. Early on in his producer career, he opened the Storyvi…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio we’re on tape, bringing you some of our favorite conversations. Susan Orlean previews her latest book about animals, including the history of the movie “Free Willy,” her relationship with turkeys and her Valentine’s Day spent with a lion. Orlean is a staff writer for the New Yorker, and an author; her latest book is “On…
 
Black holes: they’re dense, elusive, light-absorbing pockets of spacetime that are critical to our understanding of the universe. But black holes are difficult to peer into, so there’s a lot scientists still don’t know. This leaves some room for science fiction to take over. Tall tales of galactic adventure may pair well with popcorn, but they also…
 
Cultivating our capacity for gratitude is one of the core spiritual traits advocated across all the great traditions. Being grateful can restore our perspective when the slings and arrows of life temporarily bend us out of shape. To reinforce this focus, some people maintain a “gratitude journal” in which they record various things they are thankfu…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: Art Caplan begins the show by updating listeners on the latest in the pandemic, including why cases are on the rise in some parts of the country and how to have a safe Thanksgiving. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the division of medical ethics at NYU School of M…
 
The galaxy’s first space-grown New Mexican hatch chile peppers have been harvested from the International Space Station (ISS). Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio in studio Wednesday to discuss the space-grown chiles, and what these chiles could mean for the future of indoor farming. NASA employees brought 48 chile see…
 
Our oceans were once believed to be an endless source of fish. That has since been proven false — and as absurd as denying climate change. Yet, different governments around the world, including the United States, not only allow extreme overfishing but actually pay fishing boats to turn the oceans into so-called "dead zones." The World Trade Organiz…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show asking listeners their thoughts on the traditional Thanksgiving turkey, and whether it’s time for something different. Trenni Kusnierek updates listeners on the latest headlines in sports, including Boston Celtics player Enes Kanter criticizing Michael Jordan and LeBron James, and Patriots General Man…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: EJ Dionne talks about the status of Build Back Better, President Joe Biden’s medical report and whether he is eyeing a run for a second presidential term. Dionne is a columnist for The Washington Post and a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. His latest book is "Code Red: How Progressives And Moderates Can Unit…
 
Today on Under The Radar: Breathe in… and out… Easy? Not so much for Massachusetts residents, who inhaled 50 days of polluted air in 2020. Plus, with fall foliage comes piles of dead leaves and the ubiquitous leaf-blowers — environmentally conscientious consumers may want to rethink their use. And, we’re zeroing in on important takeaways from the U…
 
This week on Under the Radar: Mutants, monsters, monarchs — and the beloved superheroes who battle them — populate the Marvel universe. These days, that fictional comic book universe draws fans beyond the faithful comic book nerds. Millions of enthusiasts eagerly follow the creative storytelling, which often inspires more questions than answers. Ho…
 
Warning: This episode contains spoilers for Episode Eight of the Sixth Season of Grantchester. As Grantchester wraps its serialized sixth season, series creator Daisy Coulam is already hard at work on the seventh season. Among other new elements, the upcoming season features a new director at the helm — series star Tom Brittney. Coulam and Brittney…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: Art Caplan weighs in on the state of the pandemic, including the need for a universal digital vaccine card, and whether he’s comfortable giving out handshakes and hugs. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in Ne…
 
After UK environmental activist Ella Daish kept finding plastic tampon applicators discarded on the beach, she got the idea to incorporate them into a piece of art: a giant tampon that she would use in her #EndPeriodPlastic campaign. This past summer, she put out a call on social media asking people to mail her the used tampon applicators they came…
 
If television shows and movies are any indication, we humans spend a lot of our time subconsciously preparing for UFOs carrying maleficent aliens to descend on Earth. But should we rush to create an intergalactic battle plan? In actuality, finding otherworldly life won’t be so easy (or, hopefully, so dangerous). Already, astronomers and other scien…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd begins the show with the latest news from Washington D.C., including the latest from the Jan. 6 committee, and a House vote to censure Republican Rep. Paul Gosar of Arizona for sharing an altered anime video of him killing Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Todd is the moderator of “Meet the Press,” h…
 
Would you invite homeless men into your apartment? One woman did just that. On this episode of Humankind, you’ll hear a story of commitment and service to the poor in which Kathy McKenna founded Haley House, a homeless shelter in downtown Boston. McKenna was inspired by Dorothy Day, the Catholic Worker Movement, and the belief that to serve the poo…
 
Yes, Michelle Wu won big in this month’s mayoral election — but the idea of Boston returning to an elected school committee won even bigger, albeit in a nonbinding ballot question. In this episode of Boston’s Race Into History, City Councilors Ricardo Arroyo and Julia Mejia, who are driving the push for local legislation that would end the current …
 
The Subway tuna sandwich saga continues: Food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio to discuss new claims in a lawsuit against the sandwich chain that its tuna subs don’t contain tuna at all. “This is one of the best stories ever,” he said. “Everybody wants to test Subway tuna sandwiches and find out what’s in it.” Earlier this year, the N…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: Spencer Buell and Erica Walker talk about the rise of noise complaints in Boston, and what -- and if -- residents and politicians should do about it. Spencer Buell is a staff writer for Boston Magazine. Erica Walker is a noise researcher who founded Noise and the City. She is an assistant professor of epidemiology at B…
 
Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo has set a goal of making the Seine swimmable by 2024 when her city will host the Olympic Games. If she succeeds, it will be the first time that bathing in the Seine is legal in over 100 years. To do that, though, the city will have to significantly reduce the levels of toxic bacteria that flow through the river. Related: Se…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners their reactions to the latest slew of racist incidents at local schools. Trenni Kusnierek discusses New York Marathon runners coming to the aid of a competitor who had a heart attack during the race, and family members meddling in the lives of professional athletes. Kusnierek is an…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: Ella McDonald and Maya Mudgal begin the show by sharing their reactions to the COP26 climate summit and their thoughts on mayor-elect Michelle Wu’s climate platform. McDonald is a senior at Tufts University, and communications director at Act on Mass, a non-profit working towards more transparency at the state house. M…
 
The UN climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland, wrapped up this past weekend, issuing a set of agreements that use the strongest language yet to convey the gravity of the climate crisis. Leaders also pledged more funding for adaptation and finalized long-awaited rules for carbon markets within the UN system. Related: ‘A heavy load to carry’: A day in t…
 
MASTERPIECE Studio and GBH bring you a preview episode of a new podcast and documentary film series: American Veteran. In war and in peace, what veterans have done in America’s name is woven into the fabric of the American story. The new PBS series, American Veteran, illuminates their experiences with a stunning range of veterans’ voices, presented…
 
This week on Under the Radar: It’s Transgender Awareness Week, which is a time to reflect on issues facing the trans community, including representation in media. One space that is becoming more inclusive? Children’s literature. There is a growing catalog of books that center trans kids as main characters, and more stories that portray a range of e…
 
This week on Under the Radar: America has a recycling problem. Ever since China banned the United States' recyclables back in 2018, recycling centers in American towns and cities have struggled to manage the massive amount of waste. Not to mention paying for the infrastructure and processing costs of recycling. But a new law in Maine relieves munic…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: Shirley Leung talks about what GE’s split will mean for Massachusetts, and Tito Jackson’s seven-story cannabis venture near Faneuil Hall. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Then, we ask listeners about if the latest surge in COVID-19 cases is changing their behavio…
 
Guess what? We are officially phasing out The Takeaway's Politics with Amy Walter. We are still making our weekly politics show, but it will officially be housed on The Takeaway Podcast feed starting this week. So, what should you do? Subscribe to The Takeaway's podcasts and news feeds using iTunes or your favorite podcast client so you'll always h…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd weighs in on the blowback from Green Bay Packers’ Aaron Rodgers lying about his vaccination status, and updates listeners on the latest political headlines, including 13 House Republicans voting for the infrastructure bill. Todd is the moderator of “Meet the Press,” host of “Meet the Press Daily” on MSNBC an…
 
When our ancestors looked up into the night sky, they too saw a great, glimmering band of light splitting the darkness. In Southeast Asia, people called it “the Silver River.” In Southern Africa, “the Backbone of the Night.” And in the West, around 2,500 years ago, it earned the name “the Milky Way.” Across the globe, civilizations had theories of …
 
After entering World War One in 1917, the US government established a military draft to call up young men to serve as soldiers. 65,000 of them applied to be excused from combat and to be recognized as Conscientious Objectors (COs) by their local draft board. They opposed the war either on religious grounds (some traditions, like Quakers and Mennoni…
 
As the U.S. Federal Reserve and its chair, Jerome Powell, confront concerns over inflation and the impact of the Fed’s pandemic-era policies, we take a deep dive into the country’s central bank, which financial journalist Dion Rabouin calls “the most powerful and least understood institution in the country.” James Jacoby, a producer of the FRONTLIN…
 
Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Wednesday to explain why outdoor dining could destroy neighborhoods, following a recent New York Times article on issues with outdoor dining sheds in the Lower East Side. Small business owners in the neighborhood have lodged complaints about high noise levels, increasing rat popul…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners if they have quit their job or gone on strike, as many use this stage in the pandemic to try something new in their lives. Lylah Alphonse reports on the latest news from Rhode Island, including a coach fired from a South Kingstown school after conducting “fat tests” on naked male a…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners their reactions to a recent wave of harassment in youth sports, after Danvers school officials faced calls to resign amid reports of hazing on a boys hockey team. Trenni Kusnierek discusses recent reporting on hazing rituals on a boys hockey team in Danvers, including sexual miscon…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: EJ Dionne weighs in on what the infrastructure bill, the Virginia mayoral race and the status of voting rights and the filibuster all mean for Democrats in 2022. Dionne is a columnist for The Washington Post and a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. His latest book is "Code Red: How Progressives And Moderates C…
 
This week on Under the Radar: Candidates of color made history nationwide this month, including right here in Boston where Michelle Wu became the first woman and person of color elected as the city's mayor. Voters also gave Boston City Council new powers to override some of the mayor’s decisions. Plus, Republicans took home some big election wins n…
 
Warning: This episode contains spoilers for Episode Six of the Sixth Season of Grantchester. The police force in Grantchester is all men — with the notable exception of the sixth season's bright new regular, the sassy secretary, Miss Scott. Melissa Johns' snappy assistant can match wits with the best of them, and the actor and disability advocate r…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: Shirley Leung discusses what Mayor-elect Michelle Wu’s win means for the Asian American community, and her latest piece on how female entrepreneurs secure venture funding in a male-dominated industry. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Then, we ask listeners about …
 
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