show episodes
 
It's easy to talk about what's wrong in Baltimore. The challenge is to talk about what's next. In each episode, Wes looks at innovative ideas that are working in other cities, places like Cincinnati, St Louis, and Detroit. And he asks the question: Can those ideas work for Baltimore? This program is made possible by Genine and Josh Fidler, and supported by the Baltimore Community Foundation, created by and for the people of Greater Baltimore, where many donors join together to make the regio ...
 
Monday-Friday from noon-1:00, Tom Hall and his guests are talking about what's on your mind, and what matters most to Marylander's, the latest news, local and national politics, education and the environment, popular culture and the arts, sports and science, race and religion, movies and medicine. We welcome your questions and comments. E-mail us at midday@wypr.org
 
Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR's Morning Edition. We'll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, WYPR reporters and other journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you?d like to hear, email us at ontherecord ...
 
Life in the Balance is a monthly program that asks: What are the systemic issues in Baltimore that keep marginalized people from reaching their full potential, and what are the solutions to those problems?Each episode is rooted in an individual's story about overcoming a personal hurdle related to one of these systemic issues. It might be homelessness, drug abuse, or a post-incarceration employment struggle. This narrative engages the listener throughout the program as concerned stakeho ...
 
Since 2002, "Your Maryland" hosted by Ric Cottom, has presented little-known human interest stories from Maryland's past. Beginning with accused witches and the murderous career of John Dandy in the earliest days of the colony, through Morgan State's fabled "Ten Bears" in the 1970's, the show covers nearly four centuries of heroes, scoundrels, floods, fires, riots, plots, athletes (two-and four-legged), beautiful spies, brilliant writers, misunderstood pirates, and ghosts. All of that color, ...
 
Sports at Large is a weekly exploration of the issues and people who play and watch sports. SaL goes behind the headlines and stats to find the how and why, and the ways in which sports intersect with and influence our daily lives. SaL features interviews and commentaries from professionals and fans a like to tell a more complete story. One person described it as "a thinking fan's guide to sports."
 
Truth and Reconciliation is a forum for the people of Baltimore to discuss the challenges of law enforcement reform, alternative paths to improving communal safety, and how to hold power accountable.Through personal tales of triumph and tragedy, Truth and Reconciliation seeks new perspectives on how to improve the lives of the people of the city through activism, analysis, and actionable ideas.Hosted by Taya Graham, Sean Yoes, and Stephen Janis
 
The Noir and Bizarre explores the dark and strange stories we tell ourselves about human existence - occult history, ghosts, haunted houses, and secret crimes - with a special emphasis on stories that draw on the rich history and culture of Baltimore. Additionally, the show philosophically asks big questions about spiritual narratives and rituals surrounding life and death.
 
Catherine Collinson, the Transamerica Institute's founding president who also leads Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies® TCRS (a foremost expert on the state of retirement readiness in America), and Hector De La Torre, who leads the The Transamerica Center for Health StudiesSM TCHS, discuss the broad range of issues related to financial literacy, retirement, and health and wellness.
 
What follows is a counter to the narrative about the people of Baltimore. It's the story of Turnaround Tuesday -- the jobs movement for and with Baltimore's residents who have been excluded from earning a living, years after incarceration. It's the story of change hidden beneath the headlines about our city. It's a story of Baltimore that only Baltimore can tell. And we intend to tell it like it is. Higher Purpose is a 4 episode audio-documentary series written, produced, and narrated by Yas ...
 
Questions are raised when an out-of-town businessman comes to Baltimore offering bold promises. Kahan Dhillon, a young Sikh, Indian-American real estate developer from Fairfax County, mysteriously shows up in Baltimore touting a $10 billion citywide redevelopment plan. Although he represents himself as a civic leader and savior for a city in need of change, something seems awry. Is Kahan Dhillon a legitimate developer looking to do good for Charm City? Or is the city of Baltimore being explo ...
 
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show series
 
On this month’s episode of Future City we’re looking at the arts here in Baltimore. Where do the arts, including music, film, photography, poetry, dance and much more, fit into the future of the city, especially after the arts and entertainment industries were hit so hard by COVID-19? And how have artists mobilized to support one another during the…
 
We open this segment with the music of jazz pianist Bill Charlap, recorded live at Keystone Korner, one of the great jazz clubs in the country, which is right here in Baltimore’s Harbor East neighborhood. The proprietor of Keystone Korner is Todd Barkan. He was the 2018 recipient of the distinguished NEA Jazz Master award, and for decades, he’s bee…
 
Tom's first guest today is Jim Hunter. He was the voice of the Baltimore Orioles for 24 years. The team has been in a rebuilding mode for some time now, and that rebuild included a complete revamp of its broadcast team last January, when Jim and six of his colleagues in the Os broadcast booth were swapped out for a new team. Jim is now contributing…
 
Seventy-three years ago tomorrow, a new law permitted women to serve in the U.S. military--not only during war, but also in times of peace--and in all the branches. We speak with two women veterans about their experience. Laverne Harmon served two decades in the U.S. Army. Now, as program manager for vocational rehabilitation services at the VA Mar…
 
It's time for another visit with Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck, who joins Tom today with her review of Palestinian/Irish playwright Hannah Khalil's Scenes From 73* Years. The play is a complex tapestry of stories about daily life in Palestine since the state of Israel was established in 1948. The streaming production, utilizing a large cast…
 
If you’re headed down the ocean this weekend, as the saying goes, it’s almost a sure bet that depending on what time you leave to head east over the Chesapeake Bay Bridge to Kent Island, you will spend part of the time during your trip snarled in traffic. And if you live on the Eastern or Western Shore, your commute or your drive doing errands will…
 
Fourteen years after Marin Alsop took the podium of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra--the first woman to lead any major U.S. orchestra--she’ll conduct her last concert as music director a week from Saturday. Juneteenth honors the day in 1865 enslaved Blacks in Texas learned they were free--and the concert will start with music commissioned from Mor…
 
For decades, the term “Critical Race Theory” was known only to law professors and historians, but lately, it’s been all over the news. CRT was first introduced more than 40 years ago by legal scholars Derrick Bell, Kimberlé Crenshaw and Richard Delgado. The theory holds, basically, that racism is not simply a matter of inter-personal animus. Rather…
 
A year of online and hybrid learning left many students behind. Summer is the chance to make up for lost time. But how?Carroll County music teacher Rachel McCusker, who serves on the state board of education, describes what it was like on the ground this year. And Dr. Afra Hersi, Professor of literacy education at Loyola University Maryland and inc…
 
Tom's guest today is Calvin Butler, the Senior Executive Vice President of the energy company, Exelon and the Chief Executive Officer of Exelon Utilities, a group of six Exelon companies that includes BGE. Mr. Butler is also the Chair of the Board of Directors of the Greater Baltimore Committee, a network of business and non-profit CEOs, university…
 
As mass vaccination winds down, on-the-ground efforts to get shots in arms continue.We speak with Dr. Michelle LaRue of CASA, a nonprofit that works to expand opportunities for Latino and immigrant people. She describes barriers that discouraged Latinos from getting vaccinated, and the success of pop-up clinics across the state.Then, Rev. Dr. Terri…
 
Coming up a little later in today's program, Dr. Gigi Gronvall, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, joins us to discuss the latest news about the coronavirus. But Tom's first guest today is Beth Benner. She’s the Executive Director of the Women’s Housing Coalition. With the rates of vaccination against COVID 19 slippin…
 
Tom's next guest is Dr. Gigi Gronvall, an immunologist and senior scholar with The Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, part of the Bloomberg School of Public Health. She joins us to discuss what we know - and what we still need to know - about the origins of the SARS CoV-2 virus. What is the evidence that the virus originated in a lab, instea…
 
For months now, people have been asking: when will it end? When can I see my colleagues, family and friends? When can I go on vacation? Now those activities are in sight--yet., many of us feel hesitant. Why? Clinical psychologist Dr. Michelle Pearce, a University of Maryland-Baltimore professor, tells how behaviors learned during the pandemic becom…
 
To house workers during World War I, Bethlehem Steel purchased a thousand acres of land and embarked on a plan to develop Dundalk. Amy Menzer, head of the community development corporation Dundalk Renaissance, says the city-garden approach offered green space and functionality. And Meg Fairfax Fielding, past president of the Baltimore Architecture …
 
Here’s a Stoop Story from landscape designer Alice Sturm. It’s a story that pokes fun at death, because sometimes you have to laugh to keep from crying.The next live Stoop event is tomorrow! at 6 pm. The theme is “Re-emergence: An evening of stories, music, and cicadas!” Ticket information here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
To round out the program today, Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck joins Tom with her review of playwright Dominique Morisseau's Pipeline. It's a powerful new drama about a mother whose dreams for her son's education clash with the systemic racism in the schools that she believes are rigged to ensure her son fails. The virtual production, starri…
 
It's Midday at the Movies, our monthly look at films, filmmaking and the movie experience. Today Tom is joined once again by Jed Dietz, the founding director of the Maryland Film Festival. Midday's other regular movie maven, Washington Post film critic Ann Hornaday, is away this week. Jed and Tom discuss some of the highlights of the recent Marylan…
 
On Tuesday, Governor Larry Hogan became the 25th Republican Governor across the country to end federal enhanced pandemic benefits for people who are out of work. Some businesses are facing worker shortages, a problem the Governor described as critical, and he said that with jobs and vaccines now in good supply, the benefits are no longer needed. Th…
 
Now, an update on a story we’ve been following for more than a year. Despite efforts by local journalists, non-profits, and a wealthy businessman to acquire the Baltimore Sun from the Tribune Company, it has been sold instead to a New York Hedge Fund, Alden Global Capital. This is a worst-case scenario nightmare for those who want to see the Sun re…
 
It’s Midday with the Mayor. Baltimore City Mayor Brandon Scott joins host Tom Hall for another of their monthly live conversations about key issues on the Mayor's agenda. After another violent Memorial Day weekend, the Mayor remains committed to a multi-pronged approach to violence reduction. Progress, however is slow. The City is strategizing on h…
 
Forty years ago, contracting HIV was something close to a death sentence. Much has happened since then, including the discovery and testing of drugs that allow people with HIV to live long lives and engage in fulfilling relationships. Dr. Sebastian Ruhs has seen the trajectory of HIV treatment almost since the beginning. Now, he’s the Chief Medical…
 
Tom's first guest today is Michelle Orange, an author based here in Baltimore who has contributed to the New Yorker, Harper’s Magazine, the New York Times and other publications. She also teaches writing at Columbia University and Goucher College. Her 2013 collection of essays, called This is Running for Your Life, was critically acclaimed. Her new…
 
Tom's next guests today are two of his former colleagues in the world of choral music, an art form that has been particularly hard-hit by the pandemic. Early on in the Coronavirus crisis, it became clear to researchers that singing was one of the most dangerous activities one could engage in. Transmission of the virus among singers in choruses and …
 
As the coronavirus pandemic begins to recede … millions of disposable masks and gloves that kept people safe are beginning to surface as trash. And are not so safe for wildlife. Two Dutch researchers -- biologists Liselotte Rambonnet and Auke-Florian Hiemstra -- tell us how wildlife and domestic animals are getting entangled in, and ingesting the r…
 
For more than 150 years, the Secret Service has protected Presidents and their families, other government officials, and visiting dignitaries. Originally housed in the Treasury Department, agents in field offices across the country also investigate financial crimes like counterfeiting. In her best-selling new book, Zero Fail: The Rise and Fall of t…
 
The tide of gunshot, knife, and assault victims to University of Maryland Shock Trauma barely ebbs, not even during the pandemic. More than a third opt for the Violence Intervention Program. Social worker David Ross meets them at bedside and offers support, and program manager Erin Walton tells why patients may see a magic moment to find a new path…
 
On this Memorial Day, we mark the anniversary of one of the darkest days in American history. One hundred years ago today, a white mob began a two-day terror campaign that wiped-out a thriving Black community in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The Greenwood section of that city had come to be known as “Black Wall Street.” It was destroyed. 300 African Americans w…
 
(This interview was first broadcast on April 9, 2021) Tom's guest in this archive edition of Midday is the author of a book about three accomplished Black women: Alberta King, Louise Little and Berdis Baldwin. It’s part biography of these women, and part clarion call for recognition of all Black women. Anna Malaika Tubbs writes that erasure, mis-re…
 
The pandemic made outreach to homeless veterans difficult--but that didn’t stop advocates in Baltimore.We speak with Mary Slicher, who directs Project PLASE, a shelter with paths to permanent housing, and Kim Callari of Baltimore Station, a residential substance-abuse treatment program for veterans.Then US Air Force veteran Helen Daniel talks about…
 
As we enter this Memorial Day weekend, folks are feeling much, much better about going out and enjoying the things we weren’t able to enjoy during the long months of the pandemic. For people who are vaccinated, going to a restaurant is no longer tantamount to risking your life. For unvaccinated people, it’s a different story, for them and for those…
 
The arts provide a way to make tangible ... feelings and thoughts that otherwise seem too abstract, or even too frightening to acknowledge. Dr. Misty Borst, a psychiatrist and choreographer, felt an urge to wrestle with the trauma of 2020. In the dance video ‘Dissonance,’ she uses confession-like thoughts and feelings from pandemic health care work…
 
Tom's guest on today's edition of the Midday Newswrap is veteran Baltimore journalist Jayne Miller. She's been reporting for WBAL Television for more than 30 years, and is now the chief investigative reporter on the station's "11 Investigates" I-Team. For the past 15 months, she’s been reporting on the state’s response to the COVID 19 pandemic, and…
 
Today, we’re going to have some fun with a delightful book about English expressions, those idiomatic turns of phrase whose provenance isn’t always, or perhaps, hardly ever, known, but whose place in our language is undisputed. We're talking about phrases like “over the moon,” or “under the weather”; “on top of the world,” or “in over your head.” F…
 
Tom's guest today is the data scientist, scholar, and author, Dr. Lawrence Brown. A former member of the Morgan State University faculty, he’s also been a visiting professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He teaches in the Johns Hopkins Urban Health Institute’s Bunting Neighborhood Leadership Program, and he has spoken and written widely …
 
In his new book, “We Own This City,” Baltimore Sun crime reporter Justin Fenton unwinds a twisted tale of dirty cops, oblivious leaders, and a community betrayed by those sworn to protect it. Fenton unearths the rotten roots of the Gun Trace Task Force, an elite plainclothes police unit that won praise for its arrest rate, all while skimming from d…
 
Last week, Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott vetoed a controversial bill that would have allowed renters a couple of alternatives to paying lump-sum security deposits. One alternative, supported by most housing advocates, would have allowed renters to pay the security deposits in installments. Another provision of the bill would have allowed renters to…
 
The price of insulin is steep, but people who need it risk their health if they skip a dose.The Open Insulin Foundation aims to break the hold pharmaceutical companies exert on the cost. The group is working with local labs to develop cheaper versions of insulin.We speak with co-founder Anthony Di Franco and Dr. Lisa Scheifele of the Baltimore Unde…
 
Tom's guest today is Michelle Zauner, a successful indie-rock composer and musician who has written a wonderful book. One could also say that she’s a compelling writer who has a great band (called Japanese Breakfast). Her songs are good because they speak to universal notions in a unique and universal way. Her book is good because the story is poig…
 
For more than a year, cats and dogs have enjoyed morning playtime, midday cuddles, and lots of togetherness. Now, offices are reopening. How can pet owners prepare their companions for this transition? Maria Montgomery, lead trainer and behavior consultant at the Maryland SPCA, has tips. She says dogs need a mix of physical and mental exercise to p…
 
Joining Tom now are two African American activists and organizers who are part of the leadership team steering The Baltimore Children and Youth Fund. The Fund was created in 2017, after being approved overwhelmingly by voters in a referendum the year before. The Fund is virtually unprecedented in that its assets come from city property tax revenues…
 
President Joe Biden has called Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu several times since the conflict in the Middle East began last week, amid increasing calls from the international community to stop the violence that has killed more than 200 Palestinans and a dozen Israelis. On Tuesday, President Biden told the Israeli Prime Minister that he …
 
Black women’s risk of dying from infections, high blood pressure, blood clots and other treatable conditions during and after pregnancy is more than twice the risk of white women. Dr. Latey Bradford of the University of Maryland’s Family Medicine Clinic says pregnant Black women also confront more health dangers that don’t kill them, but can leave …
 
On today’s edition of Back to the Garden, we’ll check in again with two of our favorite green gurus: Denzel Mitchell, the Deputy Director of the Farm Alliance of Baltimore and a leader of the Alliance's new Black Butterfly Urban Farmer Academy...and Carrie Engel, the veteran greenhouse manager and plant specialist at Valley View Farms Nursery in Co…
 
We open today's edition of Back to the Garden with an update on something else that's getting back to the garden this month. In many parts of our listening area, back by entomological inevitability, the Brood X (Ten) cicadas are once again making a grand entrance onto the scene, for the first time since 2004. In just a little bit, we’ll check in wi…
 
In this episode we celebrate the anniversary of Poe’s well-known poem “The Bells,” written in May 1848 and published posthumously in 1849. The Bells describes the cycle of adult life, from excitement to joy, to fear and ultimately to the sorrow and somberness of death. Our celebration today features a performance from Baltimore’s Charm City Bronze …
 
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