×
Biographics History One Life At A Time public
[search 0]
×
Best Biographics History One Life At A Time podcasts we could find (updated February 2020)
Best Biographics History One Life At A Time podcasts we could find
Updated February 2020
Join millions of Player FM users today to get news and insights whenever you like, even when you're offline. Podcast smarter with the free podcast app that refuses to compromise. Let's play!
Join the world's best podcast app to manage your favorite shows online and play them offline on our Android and iOS apps. It's free and easy!
More
show episodes
 
Loading …
show series
 
Today’s protagonist, Robert Hanssen, was an FBI agent who served his country for 20 years. At the end of the Cold War, Hanssen sold classified secrets to the Soviet and Russian intelligence services. He compromised the security of his country and put the lives of colleagues in danger. He realised his mistakes and stopped spying, but eventually retu…
 
It is very rare that a book can come out and single-handedly change humanity’s understanding of the world. But in 1543, De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (“On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres”) did just that. It was a book by Polish astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus in which he presented his model of a heliocentric Universe - one which did no…
 
The world has an eerie fascination with serial killers. Whether it's hearing tales of the men who process their victims through meat grinders in order to feed the remains to future victims, or stories of strange fetishes and incomprehensible desires to commit atrocities upon corpses, people can't help but be intrigued. This dark side of the human p…
 
Today’s protagonist is the Generalisimo Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain from 1939 to 1975 with the title of ‘Caudillo’, leading one of the longest running dictatorships in Europe. He is best remembered as the leader of the Nationalist faction, the military insurgency which opposed the Republican government in the Spanish Civil War. But how did he…
 
Roman Emperors were men who wielded immense power in a wide variety of ways. Some were good military leaders. Some ruled fairly and openly, to the benefit of their citizens. Some were a destructive force at the centre of plots, conspiracies, and murder. Today’s protagonist was all of the above. In many ways a puzzling man, he was not born to become…
 
He’s one of the five longest reigning monarchs in the history of the world. Emperor Franz Josef ruled over first Austria and then Austria-Hungary for almost precisely 68 years. Coming to the throne on the back of a revolution aged just 18, his reign coincided with some of the most-important events in European history. It was while Franz Josef was e…
 
Who comes to mind? Fidel Castro? Che Guevara? Yeah, sure. But one man did it all 19 years before they came to power. None other than their sworn rival, Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista. Confused? You should! But keep on watching to learn more about the complex life of a man who rose from the very bottom of the social scale, ended up ruling the 4th …
 
Visitors to the Saratoga National Historical Park in New York may see the Boot Monument, a frieze that commemorates the Battle of Saratoga, one of the most significant wins for the Americans over the British during the Revolutionary War. Specifically, it honors one officer described as the “most brilliant soldier of the Continental Army”. And altho…
 
“Felicior Augusto, melior Traiano”. According to 4th century historian Eutropius, that was the acclamation used to greet new Roman emperors in his time. It expressed hope that the ruler will be “more fortunate than Augustus and better than Trajan!” The historian lived 200 years after Trajan, but the memory of his reign of prosperity was still very …
 
Being the 2nd born child in a Royal Family can be a blessing in disguise. Nobody expects you to rule, so in a way you are off the hook. But sometimes history gets in the way and unexpected events can bring you in the limelight and on the throne. That throne and that crown may represent one of the youngest, smallest and most peaceful nations in Euro…
 
The myth of the Vampire is as old as time itself, and many incarnations of this demonic creature are found in almost every culture. And when we think about Vampires today, one novel casts its shadow over legions of imitators -- Dracula, the Undead. One man -- a former civil servant, theatre manager, and part-time writer -- condensed into one single…
 
The sun was setting on the Norwegian port of Bergen. It was early July, 1349, and off in the distance, a lone ship was crossing the line of the horizon. The ship bobbed calmly, port to starboard, coming closer into view. The inhabitants of Bergen noticed its tattered sails and lack of movement on board. As gently as it had appeared, the ship entere…
 
In the 6th century BC, Cyrus II of Persia embarked on a mission of conquest. Kingdom after kingdom fell before him as he formed the Achaemenid Empire, the largest empire that the world had ever seen up until that point. It kept growing under successors like Cambyses and Darius until it, too, fell under the might of Alexander the Great during the la…
 
The King of Jerusalem stood captive in front of the Sultan. Next to him, the Lord of Kerak balked in the sweltering July heat. Earlier that day, a mighty Christian army had been utterly destroyed by the arrows of the Muslims, as much as they were by the decaying rays of an Eastern sun. The Sultan -- renowned for his generosity and kindness toward h…
 
Those were extracts from a letter that London’s Central News Agency received on September 27, 1888. It was then forwarded to Scotland Yard who were in the middle of investigating, perhaps, the most notorious killing spree of all time. Someone was attacking women in Whitechapel, murdering them and then cutting up their bodies in gruesome fashion. Th…
 
Picture the scene: it’s January 24, 41 AD and Rome is in chaos. The tyrant emperor Caligula has just been stabbed to death outside the Palatine Games. In the city, his wife has been murdered and his baby daughter had her head dashed open against a wall. In this tense, bloody atmosphere, no-one knows what will happen next. Will the Republic be resto…
 
Charles Ponzi allegedly once said “I went looking for trouble, and I found it.” Truer words were never spoken. From an early age, Ponzi discovered that hard work and book learning were not for him. He was always involved in one scheme after another, hoping that some day, he will find the one that would make him rich beyond his wildest dreams.…
 
In the early 17th Century, a religious man decided he was going to uncover the architecture of the universe itself. Using observations of the Heavens and a deep understanding of geometry, this man conjectured a world of harmonious design, where the secrets of God’s creation could be deciphered by anyone willing to use mathematics to look for them. …
 
Andrew Carnegie was a man of paradoxes. He was a businessman, first and foremost, and, oftentimes, this meant that someone else had to pay the price when he made his fortunes. Although publicly he championed the welfare of his employees, the working conditions in his many factories and plants didn’t exactly match up with his touted values.…
 
Today’s protagonist was one of the key players on the giant chessboard that was Asia at the height of the Cold War. Born into a political family, she rose through India’s political system until she became the first and only female Prime Minister of her country. Her name was Indira Gandhi. In one of her speeches, she advised her followers to maintai…
 
The thought police. Big Brother. Room 101. Even if you’ve never heard the name George Orwell, you’ve heard of the concepts he created. As the legendary writer of Animal Farm, Orwell took the volatile politics of the time he lived in, and used them to create twisted dystopias and savage satires. His 1984 is a cry for freedom still banned by repressi…
 
You are probably familiar with the musical ‘Evita,’ by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber, which tells the story of Eva Duarte and her relationship with Argentinian President Juan Perón. In the most famous number, ‘Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina’, Evita addresses the crowds after orchestrating an insurrection to free her husband, prisoner to a military …
 
Charles Ponzi. Bernie Madoff. Billy “Fyre Festival” McFarland. History is littered with the misdeeds of conmen who pulled the wool over the public’s eyes and made a killing. Some, like Frank Abagnale - the model for Leonardo Dicaprio’s character in Catch Me if You Can - pulled off cons so big they’ve become legendary. But not even Abagnale could co…
 
Some weeks ago, we ran an episode about the Vatican City State in our sister channel, Geographics. In that video, I mentioned one of the tiny state’s most peculiar residents, and many of you asked me to expand on his life here at Biographics. I am talking about Father Gabriele Amorth, the most experienced and prolific exorcist in force at the Vatic…
 
Thanks to the 1995 Mel Gibson movie Braveheart, most people are fairly familiar with the name of William Wallace. Unfortunately, thanks to the same film, most people also have a mental picture of him that varies between mildly inaccurate and completely wrong. He was, indeed, one of Scotland's most iconic freedom fighters… wasn't he?…
 
Peter the Great was, perhaps, the most important ruler in Russian history. He took a kingdom that was stuck in its old ways and transformed it into a modern and powerful empire. He looked to the West for inspiration. Peter ignored the isolationist policies and traditions of his predecessors, becoming the first tsar to visit other European countries…
 
Enzo Anselmo Ferrari was born in Modena, northern Italy on February 18, 1898. Due to a heavy snowfall, his parents had to wait for two days before the birth could be recorded. Mom Adalgisa came from a wealthy family of land owners, while dad Alfredo had set up a mechanic workshop, employing 30 workers and providing metal parts to national railways.…
 
Alexander Fleming is one of those names, inexorably linked with the discovery of penicillin. Even people who have never studied science or medicine in their lives may have still heard the story of how Fleming’s messiness accidentally yielded the first antibiotic in the world. How he left behind in his lab some Petri dishes with bacterial cultures a…
 
In the year 68 AD, Nero committed suicide, ending not only his reign as Emperor of Rome, but the reign of the Julio-Claudian Dynasty. Unsurprisingly, this plunged Rome into chaos as multiple factions tried to fill the power vacuum created by the fall of Nero. Following that came a crisis known as the Year of the Four Emperors which, as you might gu…
 
It was the shot heard around the world. On June 28, 1914, on a sweltering street in Sarajevo, a gunman fired into an open-topped car, killing Archduke Franz Ferdinand. The murder of the heir to the Austro-Hungarian Empire was the push that set the dominoes of Europe falling. One by one, the great nations declared war, until countries as far away as…
 
On October 3, 1863, a delegation of Mexican aristocrats arrived in Trieste on a secret mission. For the last few years, their country had been convulsed by violence between its Liberal and Conservative factions. The economy was in freefall, and foreign troops were occupying Mexican soil. But it wasn’t military help that the delegation had come to s…
 
Desperate times call for desperate measures, the old saying goes, and the dark days of World War Two were definitely desperate times. Had Chapman been living, working, and stealing at any other time in history, he may have found governments and military agencies — and those who regularly arrested him — to be much less lenient than they were. He was…
 
On September 19, 1991, a couple of tourists were hiking through the alpine mountains that straddle the border between Austria and Italy when they came upon a grisly sight - a frozen body with the lower half completely encased in ice. They initially thought they discovered the remains of an unfortunate mountaineer who maybe got lost or injured and d…
 
Today’s protagonist was born as a Prince in a southern Indian kingdom, but he soon discarded his palace life to embrace the study of Buddhism. As a travelling Master, he journeyed to China, where he gained powerful disciples and founded Dhyana Buddhism, better known in China as Chan, and later in Japan as Zen.…
 
Stroll down the cereal aisle at any grocery store and you'll find a myriad of choices for starting your day. Healthy and unhealthy, packed with sugar or packed with bran, we're not wanting for options. The idea of a breakfast cereal industry is one that's taken for granted in today's modern world, but it's a surprisingly recent idea with a bizarre …
 
Trippy stuff, for sure, and that's how Timothy Leary is largely remembered. While he definitely was a proponent of noshing on shrooms and tripping on psychedelic drugs, Leary was unique in that he gave a bit of professional creedence to the idea that opening your mind with LSD was a perfectly acceptable way of life and self-exploration… at least, h…
 
In the whole of Russian history, there have been a mere handful of men to earn the nickname “the great”. But there has only ever been one woman. Catherine the Great was an empress who defied both her circumstances and the opinions of those around her to shape an entire era. Born into a minor German family in the first half of the 18th Century, she …
 
As you are about to see, Wyatt Earp was a complex character full of features and foibles. An icon of the Old West? Undoubtedly, but calling him a “hero” might be stretching it a bit. He’s had his good moments, but his life was also full of questionable actions. His persona as a paragon of justice in those wild, ruthless frontier days was carefully …
 
Not many remember the name of Mary Mallon. If not for tragic circumstances, a strange immunity, and her position at the center of an outbreak of disease, it's likely that she would have faded into obscurity as just another ordinary immigrant who gave up her homeland for the promise of America in the mid-1880s. Mallon was just a teenager when she le…
 
Victorian era Britain was a time of massive change. From sweeping imperialist expansion abroad to political and social reform at home, to the rise of mysticism, spiritualism, and romanticism, the nation was growing and, in many ways, thriving. For some, cities were becoming bustling, prosperous hubs of industry, but for the less fortunate, they als…
 
One hundred years ago, a reclusive Czech-Jew living anonymously amid Prague’s spires managed to change the way we see the world. He was the son of a shopkeeper, an insurance lawyer by trade. Outwardly, he appeared sickly, forgettable. But inside? Inside, this sallow young man’s mind was alive: with visions of horror, with paranoia, existential drea…
 
Pat Garrett once admitted that the thing he feared most was having his life defined by just one moment - the killing of William H. Bonney, better known as Billy the Kid. He said he dreaded meeting new people because they always said something along the lines of “Hey! You’re Pat Garrett, the guy who shot Billy the Kid!”…
 
Otto Skorzeny was born into a middle-class family in Vienna, Austria, on June 12, 1908. As a student he distinguished himself in scientific topics, and after graduating he enlisted at the University of Vienna as an engineering student. His great passion was fencing. He joined the University fencing team and during a match he received the prominent …
 
Some months ago, we published a Biographics on Italian WWII navy commander Junio Valerio Borghese. Many of you asked us to cover more military protagonists from the Italian side of the Axis alliance, as they get less attention than their German counterparts. Here we are today with someone who we feel may satisfy your curiosity.…
 
In the winter of 1911-1912, a political earthquake in Asia brought one of our last links to the ancient world crashing down. Imperial China had outlasted the Western Roman Empire, the Byzantine Empire, the Holy Roman Empire. For 2,000 years, it had withstood civil wars and foreign invasion, only to dramatically implode after less than six months of…
 
He’s perhaps the greatest ever humanitarian. Oskar Schindler was a German industrialist who saved the lives of over 1,000 Jews during the Holocaust. The subject of a hit 1982 book, and a 1993 Steven Spielberg film that hit even bigger, Oskar Schindler today is a household name. You probably think you already know him. How he started out as a cynica…
 
Robert Mugabe. Hailed as an anti-colonialist hero; despised as an autocrat and dictator. At the time of this video production, Robert Mugabe has just recently died, aged 95, after 37 years as the Prime Minister, and then President, of Zimbabwe. The news of his death had barely become public when many of you asked us to cover his life story and care…
 
There is little that we know with certainty about his life and exploits, but we will trace his career and look in detail at some of his most famous prophecies. And, as it is fitting for such a mysterious character, there is more to be discovered about Nostradamus and his prophecies, as proven by the recent finding of a Century nr 13 in the old libr…
 
Loading …
Google login Twitter login Classic login