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Best Cambridge University podcasts we could find (updated June 2020)
Best Cambridge University podcasts we could find
Updated June 2020
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The Centre for Science and Policy at the University of Cambridge is proud to present CSaP's Science & Policy Podcast. Join us each week as our host, Dr Rob Doubleday, leads evidence-based discussions about the pressing challenges facing policymakers. Our first series - Science, Policy & Pandemics - is produced in partnership with Cambridge Infectious Diseases and the Cambridge Immunology Network and focuses on sharing the evidence and expertise policymakers need to know as they respond to co ...
 
The audio diary of a polyamorous gay guy living in the University city of Cambridge. Talking about every aspect of his life and sharing it with whoever wants to listen – talking about all sorts of varied subjects from polyamory and mental health, to music and spoken word, but that’s only just scratching the surface!
 
Herbert Allen Giles (1845-1935) spent several years as a diplomat in China and in 1897 was appointed Cambridge University’s second professor of Chinese. His published works cover Chinese language and literature, history and philosophy. This series of lectures, published as “China and the Chinese”, was given at Columbia University in 1902, to mark the establishment of a Chinese professorship there. The lectures were not intended for the specialist, more to urge a wider and more systematic stu ...
 
Exploring all things genetics. Cambridge University Alumnus and current CEO of Sano Genetics Dr Patrick Short analyses the science, interviews the experts and helps share the stories of people who have been personally affected by genetic conditions. To take part in the latest research studies mentioned in this podcast please visit sanogenetics.com/research
 
The Lauterpacht Centre for International Law is the scholarly home of International law at the University of Cambridge. The Centre, founded by Sir Elihu Lauterpacht QC in 1983, serves as a forum for the discussion and development of international law and is one of the specialist law centres of the Faculty of Law. The Centre holds weekly lectures on topical issues of international law by leading practitioners and academics. For more information see the LCIL website at http://www.lcil.cam.ac.uk/
 
Connecting jobseekers & entreprenuers with career opportunities. Gene Hodge is a futurist, author, motivational speaker, and training consultant; and Founder & President of Hodgepodge Training Inc. (HTI) and Hi-Tech Training Associates (HTA), Gene brings 20 years of experience and innovation from corporate information systems, training, and management dedicated to providing quality training to make people and organizations more productive. Gene has taught computer and job-seeking skills trai ...
 
Hey, meet Bilal, Kwaku, Patrick & Tom. 4 Black & Mixed-Race guys who became friends whilst studying at Cambridge University. Join us as we talk about life before, during and well - after 'The Bridge'. Expect chats about life, and our own experiences. email: otbpodcastuk@gmail.com Twitter: @otbpodcastuk Cast: Kwaku: @KwakuDapaah_ Patrick: @CariocoLondrino Bilal: @Tweetsbybilal Tom: @TomTheEconomist **SUBSCRIBE TO OUR MAILING LIST: https://forms.gle/RwLF9y1m3RptY2dc9**
 
David Miller is a Quilter Cheviot Executive Director and active investment manager. He makes regular appearances on TV and radio and is the author of the prizewinning weekly, Diary of a Fund Manager which now has a global circulation list of over 20,000. In a career spanning four decades, he has worked as a stockbroker and then fund manager, advising private individuals throughout, for the last ten years at Quilter Cheviot which is part of the Old Mutual Group. He read Natural Sciences at Ca ...
 
Bibliographie F. Aurenhammer, R. Klein, D-T. Lee. Voronoi diagrams and Delaunay triangulations. World Scientific (2013) J-D. Boissonnat, F. Chazal, M. Yvinec. Geometric and Topological Inference. Cambridge University Press (2017) J-D. Boissonnat, M. Teillaud ed. Effective Computational Geometry for Curves and Surfaces. Springer (2007) J-D. Boissonnat, M. Yvinec. Algorithmic Geometry. Cambridge University Press (1998) S-W. Cheng, T. K. Dey, J. R. Shewchuk. Delaunay Mesh Generation. CRC Press ...
 
A show about human rights coming to you every week from the Cambridge Centre of Governance and Human Rights. Tune in each week as our panel explores the rights and wrongs of contemporary politics, joined by fascinating guests from the University of Cambridge and around the world. (All rights reserved, so to speak. Our theme song, "Relative Dimensions", was created by the artificial intelligence at JukeDeck.)
 
Welcome to Ceasefire, a podcast discussing American politics seen from the European side of the pond! This podcast is hosted by Emily Charnock, a political historian at Cambridge University, and Hilde Restad, an associate professor of international studies at Bjørknes College in Oslo, Norway.
 
Welcome to the Brighter Thinking Pod from Cambridge University Press - Education. We provide a place where international education enthusiasts from all backgrounds can come together to discuss the challenges faced by teachers in a modern classroom and discover new teaching ideas. Our panels consist of teachers, authors, key subject figures and more, and we also celebrate the very best of teaching with our Teacher Spotlight. If you'd like to get involved, follow us on Twitter @CUPeducation an ...
 
Cambridge Life Competencies for Teens is a seven-part podcast series for English language teachers that helps you develop your students' life competencies to prepare them for early adulthood. In each episode we'll be chatting to English language teaching experts who'll be sharing their practical tips and techniques that you can use with your teenage learners.
 
My name's Dr Nina Lübbren. I'm an art historian and senior lecturer in film studies at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge, England. On this page, you can find my podcasts on how to write a university essay. You will learn to construct an argument and research your topic. My talks use film and art as examples but are relevant for students in all of the arts and humanities).Enjoy the podcasts! If you do, let me know via feedback: thanks! :-)
 
On The Cusp is a podcast exploring the interface between science and policy making. Each episode, we look at a current topic in scientific research, and interview experts and policy makers to hear what problems they face. The show is hosted by graduate students at the University of Cambridge.
 
The materials that make the world around us receive the "Master Chef" treatment to transform them into tasty, bitesized scientific morsels engineered to feed your hunger for knowledge... MaterialChef is brought to you by The Naked Scientists at Cambridge University.
 
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show series
 
The role of scientific advisers to government is under the spotlight as never before. It is easy enough to talk of “speaking truth to power” – but as governments’ efforts to tackle the coronavirus pandemic demonstrate – the science is often evolving and uncertain. At a time when politicians are relying on scientists not only to inform decisions but…
 
Photographs play a hugely influential but largely unexamined role in the practice of landscape architecture and design. Through a diverse set of essays and case studies, this seminal text unpacks the complex relationship between landscape architecture and photography. It explores the influence of photographic seeing on the design process by present…
 
Stanislav Kulchytsky’s The Famine of 1932-1933 in Ukraine: An Anatomy of the Holodomor (CIUS Press, 2018) presents a meticulous research that unveils the mechanism of the Holodomor as a man-made famine, which was launched in Ukraine by the Soviets as a punitive and controlling measure undertaken to discipline and suppress those, peasants in the fir…
 
It is hard to discuss the current film industry without acknowledging the impact of comic book adaptations, especially considering the blockbuster success of recent superhero movies. Yet transmedial adaptations are part of an evolution that can be traced to the turn of the last century, when comic strips such as “Little Nemo in Slumberland” and “Fe…
 
In this episode, I speak with Dr. Scott Seider from Boston College and Dr. Daren Graves from Simmons University on their new book, Schooling for Critical Consciousness: Engaging Black and Latinx Youth in Analyzing, Navigating, and Challenging Racial Injustice (Harvard Education Press, 2020). Over the past thirty years, we have seen a steady increas…
 
Why do contemporary writers use myths from ancient Greece and Rome, Pharaonic Egypt, the Viking north, Africa's west coast, and Hebrew and Christian traditions? What do these stories from premodern cultures have to offer us? In her new book, The Metamorphoses of Myth in Fiction since 1960, Professor Kathryn Hume examines how myth has shaped writing…
 
In Allah: God in the Qur’an (Yale University Press, 2020), Gabriel Said Reynolds argues that contrary to many scholarly and popular claims about the God of the Qur’an as either merciful or vengeful, God is in fact both. He suggests that God’s nature is a mystery and the descriptions of God, as both merciful and vengeful, are intended to have an imp…
 
In Allah: God in the Qur’an (Yale University Press, 2020), Gabriel Said Reynolds argues that contrary to many scholarly and popular claims about the God of the Qur’an as either merciful or vengeful, God is in fact both. He suggests that God’s nature is a mystery and the descriptions of God, as both merciful and vengeful, are intended to have an imp…
 
The eight stories in The Making of A Psychoanalyst: Studies in Emotional Education (Routledge, 2018) are composites of clinical material highlighting familiar emotional conflicts found in treatment. Dr. Claudia Luiz invites the reader into session switch her as she demonstrates “how two human beings interact with each other to effect profound chang…
 
In Allah: God in the Qur’an (Yale University Press, 2020), Gabriel Said Reynolds argues that contrary to many scholarly and popular claims about the God of the Qur’an as either merciful or vengeful, God is in fact both. He suggests that God’s nature is a mystery and the descriptions of God, as both merciful and vengeful, are intended to have an imp…
 
Are you overwhelmed at the amount, contradictions, and craziness of all the information coming at you in this age of social media and twenty-four-hour news cycles? Fake News, Propaganda, and Plain Old Lies (Rowman & Littlefield, 2018) will show you how to identify deceptive information as well as how to seek out the most trustworthy information in …
 
Earlier this year the world marked the 25th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide. An occasion for mourning and reflection also offered a chance to reflect on the state of research about the genocide. Among the many books that were published in the past year, Joyce E. Leader's new book From Hope to Horror: Diplomacy and the Making of the Rwanda Genoc…
 
Earlier this year the world marked the 25th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide. An occasion for mourning and reflection also offered a chance to reflect on the state of research about the genocide. Among the many books that were published in the past year, Joyce E. Leader's new book From Hope to Horror: Diplomacy and the Making of the Rwanda Genoc…
 
Stanislav Kulchytsky’s The Famine of 1932-1933 in Ukraine: An Anatomy of the Holodomor (CIUS Press, 2018) presents a meticulous research that unveils the mechanism of the Holodomor as a man-made famine, which was launched in Ukraine by the Soviets as a punitive and controlling measure undertaken to discipline and suppress those, peasants in the fir…
 
In Allah: God in the Qur’an (Yale University Press, 2020), Gabriel Said Reynolds argues that contrary to many scholarly and popular claims about the God of the Qur’an as either merciful or vengeful, God is in fact both. He suggests that God’s nature is a mystery and the descriptions of God, as both merciful and vengeful, are intended to have an imp…
 
In these two public webinars from the Faculty of Law at the University of Cambridge, the panels explore the enormous additional pressures that the pandemic has imposed on the criminal justice system.In this second webinar we look at the current conditions in English prisons and explore why more has not been done for those in custody throughout the …
 
In these two public webinars from the Faculty of Law at the University of Cambridge, the panels explore the enormous additional pressures that the pandemic has imposed on the criminal justice system.In this second webinar we look at the current conditions in English prisons and explore why more has not been done for those in custody throughout the …
 
What makes a building’s design come alive as it helps shape our existence? Listen in as I discuss this and other questions with Suzie Hodge, author of The Short Story of Architecture: A Pocket Guide to Key Styles, Buildings, Elements & Materials (Laurence King Publishing, 2019) Hodge is an art and design historian, author and artist with over 150 b…
 
To what degree did each of The Beatles exhibit emotional intelligence in the band’s final year? You'll find out in the discussion I had with Kenneth Womack about his new book Solid State: The Story of Abbey Road and The End of The Beatles (Cornell University Press, 2019). Womack is the author of a two-volume biography of the life and work of Beatle…
 
How is the retail sector going to be best able to survive the Amazon juggernaut? I address this question with B. Joseph Pine II and James H. Gilmore in a discussion of their book The Experience Economy: Competing for Customer Time, Attention, and Money (Harvard Business Review Press, 2020). Pine and Gilmore are the cofounders of Strategic Horizons,…
 
How is the retail sector going to be best able to survive the Amazon juggernaut? I address this question with B. Joseph Pine II and James H. Gilmore in a discussion of their book The Experience Economy: Competing for Customer Time, Attention, and Money (Harvard Business Review Press, 2020). Pine and Gilmore are the cofounders of Strategic Horizons,…
 
How is the retail sector going to be best able to survive the Amazon juggernaut? I address this question with B. Joseph Pine II and James H. Gilmore in a discussion of their book The Experience Economy: Competing for Customer Time, Attention, and Money (Harvard Business Review Press, 2020). Pine and Gilmore are the cofounders of Strategic Horizons,…
 
In modern times, death is understood to have undergone a transformation not unlike religion. Whereas in the past it was out in the open, it now resides mostly in specialized spaces of sequestration—funeral homes, hospitals and other medical facilities. A mainstay in so-called traditional societies in the form of ritual practices, death was usually …
 
Combining expert storytelling with genuine self-scrutiny, Casey Schwartz details the decade she spend taking Adderall to help her pay attention (or so she thought) and then considers the role of attention in defining our lives as it has been understood by thinkers such as William James, David Foster Wallace, and Simone Weil. From our craving for di…
 
Are we asleep at the (common)wheel? Civil rights attorney and law professor Gilda R. Daniels insists that contemporary voter ID laws, voter deception, voter purges, and disenfranchisement of felons constitute a crisis of democracy – one that should remind us of past poll taxes, grandfather clauses, literacy tests, and physical intimidation – that s…
 
In Collecting Food, Collecting People: Subsistence and Society in Central Africa (Yale University Press, 2016), Kathryn M. De Luna documents the evolving meanings borne in the collection of wild foods for an agricultural people in south central Africa around the turn of the first millennium. It is a history of everyday life that bears great insight…
 
How did Donald Trump’s leveraging of emotions get him to The White House? Today I discussed this question with Steven E. Schier and Todd E. Eberly, co-authors of the new book How Trump Happened: A System Shock Decades in the Making (Rowman and Littlefield, 2020). Schier is professor emeritus of political science at Carleton College and Eberly is an…
 
We are schooled to believe that states formed more or less synchronously with settlement and agriculture. In Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States (Yale University Press, 2017), James C. Scott asks us to question this belief. The evidence, he says, is simply not on the side of states. Stratified, taxing, walled towns did not inev…
 
In modern times, death is understood to have undergone a transformation not unlike religion. Whereas in the past it was out in the open, it now resides mostly in specialized spaces of sequestration—funeral homes, hospitals and other medical facilities. A mainstay in so-called traditional societies in the form of ritual practices, death was usually …
 
How did Donald Trump’s leveraging of emotions get him to The White House? Today I discussed this question with Steven E. Schier and Todd E. Eberly, co-authors of the new book How Trump Happened: A System Shock Decades in the Making (Rowman and Littlefield, 2020). Schier is professor emeritus of political science at Carleton College and Eberly is an…
 
Michele Wakin’s new book Hobo Jungle: A Homeless Community in Paradise (Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2020) is an up-close exploration of the evolution that has taken place with unsheltered homelessness. She provided an evocative portrait of a jungle encampment that has endured since the Great Depression in one of the wealthiest cities located on Calif…
 
The COVID-19 pandemic has unleashed a firehose of information (much of it wrong) and an avalanche of opinions (many of them ill-founded). Most of us are so distracted by the everyday awfulness that we don't see the broader issues in play. In this "hastily written" guide to the pandemic economy penned during self-isolation after a flight from Austra…
 
Are we asleep at the (common)wheel? Civil rights attorney and law professor Gilda R. Daniels insists that contemporary voter ID laws, voter deception, voter purges, and disenfranchisement of felons constitute a crisis of democracy – one that should remind us of past poll taxes, grandfather clauses, literacy tests, and physical intimidation – that s…
 
We are schooled to believe that states formed more or less synchronously with settlement and agriculture. In Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States (Yale University Press, 2017), James C. Scott asks us to question this belief. The evidence, he says, is simply not on the side of states. Stratified, taxing, walled towns did not inev…
 
We are schooled to believe that states formed more or less synchronously with settlement and agriculture. In Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States (Yale University Press, 2017), James C. Scott asks us to question this belief. The evidence, he says, is simply not on the side of states. Stratified, taxing, walled towns did not inev…
 
How did Donald Trump’s leveraging of emotions get him to The White House? Today I discussed this question with Steven E. Schier and Todd E. Eberly, co-authors of the new book How Trump Happened: A System Shock Decades in the Making (Rowman and Littlefield, 2020). Schier is professor emeritus of political science at Carleton College and Eberly is an…
 
Michele Wakin’s new book Hobo Jungle: A Homeless Community in Paradise (Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2020) is an up-close exploration of the evolution that has taken place with unsheltered homelessness. She provided an evocative portrait of a jungle encampment that has endured since the Great Depression in one of the wealthiest cities located on Calif…
 
How should we understand the pervasiveness – and virulence – of anti-Black violence in the United State? Why and how is anti-Black racism different from other forms of racism? How does it permeate our moral and political ideals? Frank Wilderson III combines memoir and works of political theory, critical theory, literature, and film to offer a philo…
 
How should we understand the pervasiveness – and virulence – of anti-Black violence in the United State? Why and how is anti-Black racism different from other forms of racism? How does it permeate our moral and political ideals? Frank Wilderson III combines memoir and works of political theory, critical theory, literature, and film to offer a philo…
 
While the concept of "type" has been present in architectural discourse since its formal introduction at the end of the eighteenth century, its role in the development of architectural projects has not been comprehensively analyzed. This book proposes a reassessment of architectural type throughout history and its impact on the development of archi…
 
On this episode of the New Books Network, Lee Pierce (s/t interviews Shiu-Yin Sharon Yam of University of Kentucky on the new book, Inconvenient Strangers: Transnational Subjects and the Politics of Citizenship (Ohio State University Press, 2019), which explores how intersecting networks of power—particularly race and ethnicity, gender, and social …
 
While the concept of "type" has been present in architectural discourse since its formal introduction at the end of the eighteenth century, its role in the development of architectural projects has not been comprehensively analyzed. This book proposes a reassessment of architectural type throughout history and its impact on the development of archi…
 
Criminal responsibility is a key-organizing concept of the criminal law, but Arlie Loughnan argues that it needs re-examination. Focusing on the Australian experience, Self, Others and the State: Relations of Criminal Responsibility (Cambridge University Press, 2020) questions assumptions about the rise and prominence of criminal responsibility fro…
 
We are schooled to believe that states formed more or less synchronously with settlement and agriculture. In Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States (Yale University Press, 2017), James C. Scott asks us to question this belief. The evidence, he says, is simply not on the side of states. Stratified, taxing, walled towns did not inev…
 
Tanya Harmer’s new biography, Beatriz Allende: A Revolutionary Life in Cold War Latin America (University of North Carolina Press, 2020), explores how a young Chilean woman pursued her political commitments and navigated patriarchal strictures as a militant leftist. The daughter of Salvador Allende, Beatriz Allende was born in 1942 and came of age …
 
On this episode of the New Books Network, Lee Pierce (s/t interviews Shiu-Yin Sharon Yam of University of Kentucky on the new book, Inconvenient Strangers: Transnational Subjects and the Politics of Citizenship (Ohio State University Press, 2019), which explores how intersecting networks of power—particularly race and ethnicity, gender, and social …
 
The Weimar Republic is well-known for its gay rights movement and recent scholarship has demonstrated some of its contradictory elements. In his recent book entitled The Seduction of Youth: Print Culture and Homosexual Rights in the Weimar Republic (University of Toronto Press, 2020), Javier Semper Vendrell writes the first study to focus on the Le…
 
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